Página 1 de 2 12 ÚltimoÚltimo
Resultados 1 a 10 de 20
  1. #1
    Super Moderador
    Data de Ingresso
    Sep 2010
    Localização
    Procurando...
    Posts
    4,106

    MySQL pode deixar de ser livre ou acabar?

    o que voces acham? corre-se este risco?

    fonte: Monty says: Help saving MySQL


    Help saving MySQL

    I, Michael "Monty" Widenius, the creator of MySQL, am asking you urgently to help save MySQL from Oracle's clutches. Without your immediate help Oracle might get to own MySQL any day now. By writing to the European Commission (EC) you can support this cause and help secure the future development of the product MySQL as an Open Source project.

    What this text is about:
    - Summary of what is happening
    - What Oracle has not promised
    - Oracles past behavior with Open Source
    - Help spread this information (Jump to 'What I want to ask you to do')
    - Example of email to send to the commission (Jump to 'send this to:')

    I have spent the last 27 years creating and working on MySQL and I hope, together with my team of MySQL core developers, to work on it for many more years.

    Oracle is trying to buy Sun, and since Sun bought MySQL last year, Oracle would then own MySQL. With your support, there is a good chance that the EC (from which Oracle needs approval) could prevent this from happening or demand Oracle to change the terms for MySQL or give other guarantees to the users. Without your support, it might not. The EC is our last big hope now because the US government approved the deal while Europe is still worried about the effects.

    Instead of just working out this with the EC and agree on appropriate remedies to correct the situation, Oracle has instead contacted hundreds of their big customers and asked them to write to the EC and require unconditional acceptance of the deal. According to what I been told, Oracle has promised to the customers, among other things, that "they will put more money into MySQL development than what Sun did" and that "if they would ever abandon MYSQL, a fork will appear and take care of things".

    However just putting money into development is not proof that anything useful will ever be delivered or that MySQL will continue to be a competitive force in the market as it's now.

    As I already blogged before, a fork is not enough to keep MySQL alive for all future, if Oracle, as the copyright holder of MySQL, would at any point decide that they should kill MySQL or make parts of MySQL closed source.

    Oracle claims that it would take good care of MySQL but let's face the facts: Unlike ten years ago, when MySQL was mostly just used for the web, it has become very functional, scalable and credible. Now it's used in many of the world's largest companies and they use it for an increasing number of purposes. This not only scares but actually hurts Oracle every day. Oracle have to lower prices all the time to compete with MySQL when companies start new projects. Some companies even migrate existing projects from Oracle to MySQL to save money. Of course Oracle has a lot more features, but MySQL can already do a lot of things for which Oracle is often used and helps people save a lot of money. Over time MySQL can do to Oracle what the originally belittled Linux did to commercial Unix (roughly speaking).

    So I just don't buy it that Oracle will be a good home for MySQL. A weak MySQL is worth about one billion dollars per year to Oracle, maybe more. A strong MySQL could never generate enough income for Oracle that they would want to cannibalize their real cash cow. I don't think any company has ever done anything like that. That's why the EC is skeptic and formalized its objections about a month ago.

    Richard Stallman agrees that it's very important which company owns MySQL, that Oracle should not be allowed to buy it under present terms and that it can't just be taken care of by a community of volunteers. Letter to the EC opposing Oracle's acquisition of MySQL | Knowledge Ecology International

    Oracle has NOT promised (as far as I know and certainly not in a legally binding manner):

    - To keep (all of) MySQL under an open source license.
    - Not to add closed source parts, modules or required tools.
    - To keep the code for MySQL enterprise edition and MySQL community edition the same.
    - To not raise MySQL license or MySQL support prices.
    - To release new MySQL versions in a regular and timely manner. (*)
    - To continue with dual licensing and always provide affordable commercial licenses to MySQL to those who needs them (to storage vendors and application vendors) or provide MySQL under a more permissive license
    - To develop MySQL as an Open Source project
    - To actively work with the community
    - Apply submitted patches in a timely manner
    - To not discriminate patches that make MySQL compete more with Oracles other products
    - To ensure that MySQL is improved also in manners that make it compete even more with Oracles' main offering.

    From looking at how Oracle handled the InnoDB acquisition, I don't have high hopes that Oracle will do the above right if not required to do so:

    For InnoDB:
    - Bug fixes were done (but this was done under a contractual obligation)
    - New features, like compression that was announced before acquisition, took 3 years to implement
    - No time tables or insight into development
    - The community where not allowed to participate in development
    - Patches from users (like Google) that would have increased performance was not implemented/released until after Oracle announced it was acquiring Sun.
    - Oracle started working on InnoDB+, a better 'closed source' version of InnoDB
    - In the end Sun had to fork InnoDB, just to be able to improve performance.

    It's true that development did continue, but this was more to be able to continue using InnoDB as a pressure on MySQL Ab.

    Note that Oracle's development on the Linux kernel is not comparable with MySQL, because:
    - Oracle is using Linux as the main platform for their primary database product (and thus a better Linux makes Oracles platform better)
    - The GPL code in the kernel is not affecting what is running on top on it (because of an exception in Linux).

    Because we don't have access to a database of MySQL customers and users the only way we can get the word out is to use the MySQL and Open Source community. I would never have resorted to this if Oracle had not broken the established rules in anticompetitive merger cases and try to influence the EC by actively mobilising the customers after the statement of objection was issued.

    It's very critical to act upon this AS SOON AS POSSIBLE as EC, depending on what Oracle is doing, needs to make a decision around 2010-01-05. Because of the strict deadline, every email counts!

  2. #2
    Louco pelo WHT Brasil
    Data de Ingresso
    Jan 2011
    Localização
    Aveiro, Portugal
    Posts
    154
    Winger,

    Li toda a mensagem em inglês - e não acredito que o criador do MySQL iria falar besteira, sem necessidade. Se ele está falando algo, as pessoas deveriam escutar.

    Ele cita o exemplo do InnoDB que teve o desenvolvimento parado e que a Oracle já planeja lançar o InnoDB+, com código fechado e certamente comercial... portanto ele tem as razões dele para acreditar que algo de ruim possa acontecer com o MySQL.

    E o MySQL é um grande herói no mercado - a 10 anos atrás os programadores (no Brasil) riam do MySQL e debochavam dizendo que era um banco ruim, fraco e sem recursos - somente usava quem não tinha dinheiro. Projetos sérios só queriam considerar o Oracle, MS SQL Server e eventualmente o Firebird e PostgreSQL. Mas com o passar dos anos o MySQL conquistou muito espaço, melhorou muito e ganhou a confiança do mercado - e isso chama atenção.

    Sinceramente acho que existe risco para o MySQL - só não sei quanto arriscado e em quanto tempo. E se vier a se tornar fechado, será mais um custo para as empresas de hospedagem, provedores e empresas em geral.

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,608
    E hoje, existe algum equivalente que os programadores possam rir hehehehe

    Para ser a promessa para daqui 10 anos?
    oGigante.com*• Revenda de Hospedagem Cloud Linux + WHMCS Grátis
    VWhost.com.br • Revenda de Hospedagem Linux Cpanel + CloudFlare
    Zocka.com.br • Hospedagem de Sites Cpanel + Construtor de Sites

  4. #4
    Quero ser Guru
    Data de Ingresso
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    47
    Nossa, nem quero pensar nisso...

    O postgresql não seria uma opção? ele é livre não é?

  5. #5
    Louco pelo WHT Brasil
    Data de Ingresso
    Jan 2011
    Localização
    Aveiro, Portugal
    Posts
    154
    Citação Postado originalmente por Duda Ver Post
    Nossa, nem quero pensar nisso...

    O postgresql não seria uma opção? ele é livre não é?

    Sim, é uma opção gratuita - aliás já muito utilizada.

    Mas este não é o problema... o problema mesmo é todos os scripts passarem a ser compatíveis com o PostgreSQL ou qualquer outro banco que não seja o MySQL, vai ver Wordpress, Joomla, PHPLIST, Mambo e tantos outros scripts... fora os sites desenvolvidos para MySQL com sistemas proprietários.

    Se algum dia o MySQL deixar de ser gratuito, os usuários vão correr atrás de quem oferecer o MySQL - poucos vai querer gastar tempo e dinheiro adaptando scripts - em um cenário assim quem não tiver o MySQL iria perder muitos clientes.

    Mas por enquanto é somente uma leve preocupação - é importante acompanhar este assunto de perto e ver como o futuro do MySQL será conduzido.

    Creio que se a Oracle pegar mesmo o MySQL não iria fechá-lo - talvez eles iriam manter uma versão gratuita e atrasada, e ter uma versão completa, comercial, 100% atualizada. Realmente não sei.

  6. #6
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,990
    O MySQL foi vendido para a SUN em 2008 por 1 bilhão de dolares. Se tem algum vilão nessa estória são os autores.

  7. #7
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Nov 2010
    Localização
    Rio de Janeiro - RJ
    Posts
    2,289
    Citação Postado originalmente por 5ms Ver Post
    O MySQL foi vendido para a SUN em 2008 por 1 bilhão de dolares. Se tem algum vilão nessa estória são os autores.
    Concordo, pois usaram toda uma comunidade para o desenvolvimento de uma plataforma e depois do sucesso obtido venderam por um valor "nada mau".

  8. #8
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,990
    Por coincidência, hoje está circulando um press-release da Apprenda:


    Former MySQL Executive Kerry Ancheta Joins Apprenda as Vice President of Sales

    ...

    Apprenda today announced Kerry Ancheta has joined the company as Vice President of Sales. Ancheta’s direct sales and marketing experience spans 15-years, including spending nearly a decade building MySQL, where he served as Vice President of Enterprise Sales for the Americas and helped build the company toward its successful acquisition by Sun Microsystems in 2007.

    Ancheta joins Apprenda as a decorated senior sales leader who has propelled multi-million dollar growth across key regions worldwide. At MySQL, Ancheta’s sales and marketing efforts helped catapult the startup organization from less than $1 million in sales revenues to being acquired for $1 billion by Sun Microsystems.

    ...

    prweb com
    /releases/2011/02/prweb5076954.htm
    Uma empresa que possui "Vice President of Enterprise Sales for the Americas" que "propelled multi-million dollar growth across key regions worldwide" tem muito mais o perfil de usar a comunidade para lucros imediatos (e como lucrou) do que pensar no futuro dessa comunidade. Se o pessoal do MySQL era assim, não será um tubarão confesso como a Oracle que irá refrescar a lagoa para o bem estar do rabo dos patos.
    Última edição por 5ms; 16-02-2011 às 12:35.

  9. #9
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,990
    Citação Postado originalmente por mindnet Ver Post
    ... 10 anos atrás os programadores (no Brasil) riam do MySQL e debochavam dizendo que era um banco ruim, fraco e sem recursos - somente usava quem não tinha dinheiro. Projetos sérios só queriam considerar o Oracle, MS SQL Server e eventualmente o Firebird e PostgreSQL. Mas com o passar dos anos o MySQL conquistou muito espaço, melhorou muito e ganhou a confiança do mercado - e isso chama atenção.
    Debochavam? Eu tenho um outro lado dessa estória. Há 10 anos o MySQL era uma farsa. O manual listava recursos que não tinham sido implantados, mesmo os mais simples e usuais para quem realmente conhece banco de dados. Quando você tentava se informar sobre qualquer dessas features com alguém que usava MySQL a resposta era quase sempre debochada. "Store procedure pra que? Isso é frescura de dbms de boutique." E lá vinha uma solução improvisada e ruim.

    É bom lembrar também que O MySQL nunca esteve na classe do Oracle e do DB2 e nem ao menos na do MS SQL, que ainda hoje luta por uma posição no mercado corporativo de banco de dados.

  10. #10
    Quero ser Guru
    Data de Ingresso
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    36
    Penso que isso será bastante ruim para todos nós. Imagine ter que pagar licença de uso ou adaptar um script para ser usado com outro banco de dados.
    Só pelo fato de um importante projeto open source estar ameaçado, já é uma má notícia. Eu estou bastante acostumado à dupla PHP/MySQL.

Permissões de Postagem

  • Você não pode iniciar novos tópicos
  • Você não pode enviar respostas
  • Você não pode enviar anexos
  • Você não pode editar suas mensagens
  •