Resultados 1 a 4 de 4
  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,028

    DCs americanos: Panorama 2012/2013 dos 10 maiores mercados metropolitanos

    O estudo incluiu Phoenix e Boston além das 8 regiões de interconexão.





    Cushman & Wakefield Data Center Expert Provides Outlook for Top 10 U.S. Markets

    March 27, 2012

    Sean Brady, co-founder of Cushman & Wakefield of New Jersey, Inc.’s Data Center Advisory Group, brought his background and the group’s expertise to a data center presentation sponsored by Jefferies & Company, Inc. The presentation focused on the 10 largest metro data center markets in the U.S.: New York (including New Jersey), San Francisco, Northern Virginia, Dallas, Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, Seattle, Phoenix and Boston.

    Among the key points: The market’s fundamentals remain strong, supporting supply in the pipeline; colocation fundamentals appear stronger than wholesale; and the Boston, Seattle, Phoenix, Los Angeles and Chicago markets have the most supply issues with vacancy rates over 15 percent. If New Jersey was not included in the New York Metro statistics, then it to would be among those over 15 percent.

    We project that 2012 and 2013 will be solid years for internet growth, fueling data center demand,” Brady told attendees of the New York event presented by Jefferies, a global securities and investment banking group. “There is meaningful supply in the pipeline, but there was enough demand to absorb most of the new space as of the fourth quarter of 2011.

    While much of that demand will be focused on the 10 largest markets, Brady underscored
    data center growth by outlining the top five underserved or emerging markets set to raise their profile in 2012: Denver, San Diego, Portland, Houston, and Miami. The Portland market, by way of example, has greater tax incentives that will attract more users, on top of some of the lowest electrical rates in the country because of the availability of hydropower.

    “There is pent-up demand for space that could get unleashed in all of the key markets if IT spending improves as cash-rich companies become more confident in the economy,” he said. “I see, however, a national trend of corporations either performing studies or executing data center refresh or consolidation to save money long-term. Most global corporations are trying to lower their data center operating expenses, increase redundancy, resiliency and security.

    “The long-term goal is to reduce the number of servers, racks, and ‘white’ floor space,” Brady said. “This could also reduce a typical corporation’s global data centers from, say, 15, 20 or 30, down to six – two in the U.S., two in Europe, and two in Asia, which addresses all of the time zones.”

    Another national trend that emerged in 2011, Brady told seminar attendees, is that third-party providers are “swimming upstream for more business and market share. Wholesalers are beginning to provide colocation services,” he said. “The colocation providers are offering a higher level of managed services and introducing Cloud if they don’t already have it. The providers that don’t have it are starting their own in-house Cloud service, and some have outsourced the service to bring it online more quickly. Going upstream and offering more services increases profit margins. By itself, Cloud service is expected to grow by 15 percent year over year for 2012 and 2013.”

    In any event, “this shift in the third-party data center providers is causing an increased supply in all markets nationally,” he said. The increase in space is changing the way service is being offered, and it is changing the way users buy this service. The providers are becoming very competitive when they are bidding on the corporate user’s requirement. This has made the market more complex and complicated and it has become increasingly more important to use a qualified real estate advisor. According to Brady, the ideal team includes a data center engineer, real estate professional, and an attorney to get the best economical and contractual agreement.

    In turn, that increased supply will cause a 5-10 percent decline in wholesale and colocation pricing, Brady predicts. That may already be happening: “Nationally, rents have seen downward pressure in the top markets,” he notes. For now, though, the drop might not be precipitous and rates could remain “relatively steady” through 2012.

    The average price in the U.S.’ top 10 markets is in $170-$185 per kW range per month, and the average size tenant demand in most of these markets is 200 kW to 350 kW per month.

    The top five markets Brady expects to see the greatest demand in 2012 are Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, Phoenix and metro Seattle.

    The industries that will dominate the demand are technology/media, financial services and consumer goods.

    In terms of colocation vs. wholesale, “the strongest demand currently in the market is users looking for 200 to 350 kW of power, which benefits colocation operators,” Brady noted. “But most of the wholesalers have or are starting to lower their power requirements to accommodate those tenants. Many of the largest enterprise/ corporations use the wholesale model or build their own data centers, while smaller users are turning to colocation operators that cater to their space requirements and can offer managed solutions for companies that need help in running their servers.”

    The research for Brady’s presentation was developed with the help of the professionals of Cushman & Wakefield’s Data Center Advisory Group, which includes the real estate industry’s most experienced advisors within this highly specialized asset class. Focusing on data centers, telecom switches, network providers, disaster recovery sites, and critical operations centers, the group includes brokers, consultants, appraisers, project and facility managers in key markets, and currently manages more than 20 million square feet of mission critical space. The group includes:

    • Thirty global data center experts, advisors and brokers
    • Financial Consulting Group (which provides sophisticated financial structure, engineering and analysis)
    • Business Continuity and Crisis Management Consulting Group
    • Data Center Cost Segregation Group
    • Project Management Group (responsible for building more than 2.5 million square feet of mission critical facilities in the past three years)
    • Global Data Center Valuation and Advisory Service
    • Capital Markets Group
    • National Mission Critical Research Department

    Among recent transactions, a Brady-led team arranged Sabey Data Centers’ $120 million principal condominium interest acquisition of 29 floors of the 32-story, 1.1 million-square-foot former Verizon Building on Lower Manhattan’s Pearl Street.

    “This was an important transaction because it is Manhattan’s only special-purpose redevelopment of an existing building as a secure data center,” said Brady. “It also marks the ongoing resurgence of Lower Manhattan, while simultaneously expanding the influence of one of the country’s largest data center providers.”


    http://www.datacenterjournal.com/pre...0-u-s-markets/
    Última edição por 5ms; 28-03-2012 às 15:04.

  2. #2
    Moderador
    Data de Ingresso
    Oct 2010
    Localização
    Rio de Janeiro
    Posts
    2,679
    Miami é underserved, mas também só dá idiota

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,028
    Citação Postado originalmente por cresci Ver Post
    Miami é underserved, mas também só dá idiota
    Vendedores, compradores, ou ambos?

    BTW você está vendo algum movimento em San Diego, Houston ou Denver? Alguma novidade para prever crescimento? Para mim são tres nulidades (Denver com um zero esquerda a menos).


    While much of that demand will be focused on the 10 largest markets, Brady underscored data center growth by outlining the top five underserved or emerging markets set to raise their profile in 2012: Denver, San Diego, Portland, Houston, and Miami.
    Última edição por 5ms; 29-03-2012 às 09:33.

  4. #4
    Moderador
    Data de Ingresso
    Oct 2010
    Localização
    Rio de Janeiro
    Posts
    2,679
    Citação Postado originalmente por 5ms Ver Post
    Vendedores, compradores, ou ambos?
    Ambos.

    Compradores: em geral são latinos ou PMEs locais que pouco entendem do negócio e caem na conversa de vendedor. Em especial, Miami ainda é um mercado muito "local". Ninguém lá oferece remote hands 24x7 onsite, a preguiça é tanta que é todo mundo oncall e o preço por hora é absurdo (150/h em horário comercial e 250/h fora dele). Com isso, você tem de ter alguém local lá, e os clientes são tratados como "se vira, vai você ao datacenter consertar porque eu não vou não". A maior parte das vendas lá é de "1 cabinet + 20amps" para small businesses locais, porque são os únicos que não dão banana para os vendedores quando ouvem os custos de remote hands.

    Vendedores: Eles são a versão cubana/caribenha dos "amigos dos amigos", ou seja, são a perfeita incorporação do Scarface ("say hello to my little friend") :-) A maioria das facilities é meia-boca, datacenter velho de telecom mesmo. Aliás, eles tratam o mercado de colocation ainda como mercado de telecom; fazem planejamentos para pouquíssima densidade de energia (a maioria pula se vc pedir mais do que 4kW utilizáveis/5kW total e em geral quer que vc fique no 2.4kW/rack) e esperam que vc faça o pedido de dezenas de cross connects de T1s e DS3s. Obviamente, botam sua banca e não querem competir. E como o mercado local tem muito 171, eles têm uma certa razão até em não querer competir por preço, mas a negociação é muito difícil, e a especialidade deles é ficar falando mal da concorrência e apontando os defeitos como forma de tentar te ganhar com as "vantagens" deles (sendo que todo mundo tem algum rabo preso). Como "alternativa" você tem a Terremark, 3x mais cara que a média dos preços da cidade. O preço de trânsito e de transporte fora da Terremark/NAP está em média atrasado uns 5 anos em relação ao resto do país, e como há limitação no número de carriers presentes fora do NAP, a oferta igualmente é desesperadora e os preços um tanto quanto altos. Com o povo lá, para negociar, vc tem que pegar o avião, negociar face-to-face e botando o pau na mesa, não fazendo cara de bunda, que só aí eles vão entender que você não é um otário (e alguns sequer vão querer fazer negócio com vc, "o espertinho" depois disso).

    Carriers: tirando a incumbente AT&T, e a Level3 que comprou a maioria dos pequenos transport providers locais nos últimos 10 anos (MFN, EPIK), tem só dois outros provedores de fibra "carrier-neutral" relevantes, a Fiberlight e a FPL FiberNet (essa, da incumbente elétrica, que não tem concorrência no sul da Florida, é monopolista). Obviamente eles só querem lidar com grandes contas. E para os carriers em si saírem do NAP, eles requerem grandes commitments, no mínimo 10GE/US$ 15k por mês para usarem uma dessas fibras acima mencionadas, ou então muito mais se for para um buildout completo (ir com a própria fibra até o datacenter), visto que nos EUA o custo de obra desse tipo é absurdo.
    Fora que tem os carriers que não apostam em Miami como PTT para a América Latina (tem os malucos que insistem em Atlanta ou Ashburn ou mesmo NYC) e têm sub-estrutura para lá, ou volta e meia têm problemas de oversubscription em Miami (dica: Global Crossing) ou roteamentos loucos (dica: Telefónica).

    O mercado de Miami é promissor sim, o custo de energia é abaixo da média do mercado do resto do país (em Miami em geral sai a US$ 12/A já condicionado e com os custos de gerador e nobreak embutidos; na companhia elétrica ele sai a US$ 0.09/kWh; já em NYC-Manhattan ou Fremont chega facil a US$ 20-30/A; em LAX é $15-18/A, e por aí vai); a oferta de conectividade na Terremark é absurdamente abundante (basta chegar até ela). O que falta lá é estabelecer um IXP paralelo diferente da Terremark; que é o principal empatador de custos lá (um cross connect custa um absurdo; e conectar-se ao IXP da Terremark não é de graça e tem um certo custo "carinho"; e para fazer colocation de roteador lá dentro é outro "carinho". Se tivesse um outro exchange mais barato ou gratuito, nego trocaria a Terremark por este outro num instante (vide PTT.BR) ou quando algum player mais pesado em termos de tráfego se mudasse para este outro IXP, aí sim mataria a Terremark (vide PTT.BR + Google). IXPs da Equinix e Telx não contam, porque são igualmente caros e eles tentam te roubar de maneiras diferentes :-)

    Em Miami, por exemplo, você vai num datacenter "convencional" e não vê servidores "em massa" (salvo raras exceções). O que você vê é um bando de equipamentos de telecom e roteadores; e uma meia dúzia de servidores (quando muito) por rack. Os caras de operações até se espantam quando vêem 32/40 servidores num rack, acham que aquilo vai pegar fogo, que a energia será abusada; os vendedores crescem o olho achando que você está tendo lucros milionários com aqueles 32 servidores, e na hora de renovar o contrato querem te enfiar a faca pelo dobro do preço, na ganância mesmo (eles não fazem a mínima idéia de quanto custa um servidor dedicado no mercado, porque não vendem isso diariamente; quando vendem algum, cobram em geral o dobro ou triplo do preço do mercado). Lá eles querem vender muito, entregar pouco, e cobrar valores absurdos e fora da realidade atual. Vou dar um exemplo: tem um ex-cliente que me terceirizou o gerenciamento técnico (esse meu cliente só entendia de racks, parafusos, tomadas de energia, e puxar fio; servidores e hardware eles terceirizavam pra mim) de um contrato dele com uma empresa de gateway SMS européia. O contrato era para 1 firewall Sonicwall + 4 servidores X3430 com 8GB de RAM e 2 HDs de 1TB cada, não-gerenciados (que eu lembre, em todo o 1 ano, só precisaram do nosso remote hands uma vez, para dar boot no firewall porque se auto-travaram). O uso de banda não passava de 1-2Mbps (e o contratado era 5Mbps). Valor que o cliente final pagava? US$ 2400 mensais. Investimento inicial? US$ 6000 para comprar o hardware.

    BTW você está vendo algum movimento em San Diego, Houston ou Denver? Alguma novidade para prever crescimento? Para mim são tres nulidades (Denver com um zero esquerda a menos).
    Em San Diego existem apenas 2 ou 3 datacenters cujo preço é alto. Para mim, lá sempre foi a base dos montadores/integradores Supermicro (os dois maiores/mais baratos do país estão e são locais de lá: RackmountsETC e PCN).

    Houston tem capacidade de infra sobrando depois que o MegaUpload foi para a Virginia, mas também só tem 2 ou 3 prédios "iluminados" fora as instalações da antiga RackShack (que como pudemos ver, está sendo parcialmente desativada já pela Softlayer)

    Denver também é meio escasso, tem 3 prédios só: o da FDC, o da HandyNetworks (dentro da Qwest, em downtown Denver), e o carrier-neutral da 393 Inverness Drive (Data393). Porém, é um ponto de troca de tráfego grande entre noroeste e sudoeste.

    Não vi nenhum recente movimento de crescimento (fora a FDC em Denver). É a malemolência própria em ação.

Permissões de Postagem

  • Você não pode iniciar novos tópicos
  • Você não pode enviar respostas
  • Você não pode enviar anexos
  • Você não pode editar suas mensagens
  •