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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    GTT compra nLayer

    May 1st, 2012 by Robert Powell

    Just a few weeks shy of a year after taking out PacketExchange, Global Telecom & Technology has made its second acquisition of a tier-2 network operator. The operator has now bought Chicago-based nLayer Communications, according to an announcement this morning. Financial terms were not disclosed.

    GTT seems to have made up its mind to go all-in in the IP transit and Ethernet space as part of its overall managed data service offerings. The nLayer assets will boost the company’s coverage and scale, both in the US and transatlantic.

    There is substantial overlap between the two, and the deal probably also removes a frequent competitor from the field. Here’s the two maps side by side.







    I have not really covered GTT too much up until now, but if they’re going to keep buying network operators that’s going to have to change!

    Network M&A: GTT Acquires nLayer | Telecom Ramblings

  2. #2
    Moderador
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    Oct 2010
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    Sobrou apenas a Highwinds e a Limelight...
    Subir, subir, o preço de banda vai subiiiiiiiiiir...

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Dec 2010
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    XO Communications Launches CDN Services Using Limelight's Managed CDN Platform

    Over time, XO's goal is to move from a managed CDN model with Limelight to one where they simply license Limelight's technology and then deploy and manage all of their own hardware.

    XO Communications Launches CDN Services Using Limelight's Managed CDN Platform | Dan Rayburn - StreamingMediaBlog.com

  4. #4
    Moderador
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    Com a liXO eu quero é distância...

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Dec 2010
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    What's Limelight Up to? | Telecom Ramblings

    ... what I see happening is a preparation for a sale. Last year was too soon, and the situation was too messy to get a good price. So they’re putting their commoditized CDN business’s cost structure in order, demonstrating the potential of their value-added products, and buying back stock to demonstrate how cheap they think it is. With their cash balance there is no pressing need to sell, so they’re trying to reach a position of strength first.

    Limelight is getting very little respect these days from the market. With a marketcap of less than $300M, net cash of more than $135M, just under $200M in revenue and a global CDN infrastructure – one has to wonder why a buyer hasn’t already pounced. Last year there was repeated speculation the company would sell to Level 3, and I was skeptical at the time because Level 3 didn’t need the deal and they were busy with Global Crossing. Now that they’re further along, it is becoming more reasonable an idea.

    But what Limelight’s actions fit best perhaps is an attempt to attract private equity buyers of internet infrastructure. Someone like ABRY Partners, for instance, which might find owning Limelight a nice complement to Masergy, Sidera, Telx, and the various data center assets they’ve been buying. As a privately held company with siblings, Limelight might find it quite a bit more comfortable to manage its transformation.

    Another possibility that really might work would be NTT, which has been actively positioning itself and its tier 1 IP backbone for the cloud revolution. Their entire portfolio and global reach would fit quite nicely into NTT’s plans, and there would be substantial cost savings to be had. NTT already has some CDN capabilities, but nothing of Limelight’s scale.

    Or there could be other strategic buyers out there, even if they are a bit more outlandish.

    For instance, at these prices Icahn could decide to meld Limelight’s CDN and managed services with XO. He could do it with his pocket change, and in the right hands the combination could make more sense than most others. In fact, XO is already leveraging Limelight’s capabilities as part of its Concentric Cloud solutions. CDN-CDN integrations are hard, but melding one on a backbone that doesn’t have such technology is relatively easy. What better way to quickly change the value perception of a business we know Icahn will eventually sell.

    Or a Cogent/Limelight combination could make sense. If internet backbones must eventually meld CDN infrastructure into their own, Cogent could do worse than to take such a route. Their netcentric customers often already pair IP transit with site acceleration and such, and what better way to regain their mojo after the MegaUpload debacle than to take their low-price business model to the CDN segment as well?

    Whatever happens, it feels to me as if Limelight will be in play this summer — if it isn’t already.

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