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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010

    Flame - a mais sofisticada arma cibernética da atualidade

    Flame can easily be described as one of the most complex threats ever discovered. It’s big and incredibly sophisticated. It pretty much redefines the notion of cyberwar and cyberespionage.

    It is a backdoor, a Trojan, and it has worm-like features, allowing it to replicate in a local network and on removable media if it is commanded so by its master.


    Once a system is infected, Flame begins a complex set of operations, including sniffing the network traffic, taking screenshots, recording audio conversations, intercepting the keyboard, and so on. All this data is available to the operators through the link to Flame’s command-and-control servers.

    Later, the operators can choose to upload further modules, which expand Flame’s functionality. There are about 20 modules in total and the purpose of most of them is still being investigated.
    Matéria completa: The Flame: Questions and Answers - Securelist

    The malware, discovered by Russia-based anti-virus firm Kaspersky Lab, is an espionage toolkit that has been infecting targeted systems in Iran, Lebanon, Syria, Sudan, the Israeli Occupied Territories and other countries in the Middle East and North Africa for at least two years.

    Dubbed “Flame” by Kaspersky, the malicious code dwarfs Stuxnet in size – the groundbreaking infrastructure-sabotaging malware that is believed to have wreaked havoc on Iran’s nuclear program in 2009 and 2010. Although Flame has both a different purpose and composition than Stuxnet, and appears to have been written by different programmers, its complexity, the geographic scope of its infections and its behavior indicate strongly that a nation-state is behind Flame, rather than common cyber-criminals — marking it as yet another tool in the growing arsenal of cyberweaponry.

    The researchers say that Flame may be part of a parallel project created by contractors who were hired by the same nation-state team that was behind Stuxnet and its sister malware, DuQu.

    “Stuxnet and Duqu belonged to a single chain of attacks, which raised cyberwar-related concerns worldwide,” said Eugene Kaspersky, CEO and co-founder of Kaspersky Lab, in a statement. “The Flame malware looks to be another phase in this war, and it’s important to understand that such cyber weapons can easily be used against any country.”
    Early analysis of Flame by the Lab indicates that it’s designed primarily to spy on the users of infected computers and steal data from them, including documents, recorded conversations and keystrokes. It also opens a backdoor to infected systems to allow the attackers to tweak the toolkit and add new functionality.

    The malware, which is 20 megabytes when all of its modules are installed, contains multiple libraries, SQLite3 databases, various levels of encryption — some strong, some weak — and 20 plug-ins that can be swapped in and out to provide various functionality for the attackers. It even contains some code that is written in the LUA programming language — an uncommon choice for malware.

    Kaspersky Lab is calling it “one of the most complex threats ever discovered.”

    “It’s pretty fantastic and incredible in complexity,” said Alexander Gostev, chief security expert at Kaspersky Lab.
    Flame appears to have been operating in the wild as early as March 2010, though it remained undetected by antivirus companies.
    Matéria completa: Meet 'Flame', The Massive Spy Malware Infiltrating Iranian Computers | Threat Level |

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Nov 2010
    Saiu no tecnoblog também:

    Um novo worm parecido com a Stuxnet foi descoberto essa semana pela firma de segurança Kaspersky em conjunto com a ITU, União Internacional de Telecomunicações. Chamado de Flame, esse mawlare está sendo chamado de “o mais complexo já criado até hoje” não só pelo seu tamanho incomum como pelas ações que executa: ele se torna um programa espião em todo o computador que infecta.
    Texto completo: Malware Flame, o mais complexo até agora, se alastra no Oriente Médio*• Revenda de Hospedagem Cloud Linux + WHMCS Grátis • Revenda de Hospedagem Linux Cpanel + CloudFlare • Hospedagem de Sites Cpanel + Construtor de Sites

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Obama Order Sped Up Wave of Cyberattacks Against Iran

    Confirmed: US and Israel created Stuxnet, lost control of it | Ars Technica

    From his first months in office, President Obama secretly ordered increasingly sophisticated attacks on the computer systems that run Iran’s main nuclear enrichment facilities, significantly expanding America’s first sustained use of cyberweapons, according to participants in the program.

    Mr. Obama decided to accelerate the attacks — begun in the Bush administration and code-named Olympic Games — even after an element of the program accidentally became public in the summer of 2010 because of a programming error that allowed it to escape Iran’s Natanz plant and sent it around the world on the Internet. Computer security experts who began studying the worm, which had been developed by the United States and Israel, gave it a name: Stuxnet.

    At a tense meeting in the White House Situation Room within days of the worm’s “escape,” Mr. Obama, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and the director of the Central Intelligence Agency at the time, Leon E. Panetta, considered whether America’s most ambitious attempt to slow the progress of Iran’s nuclear efforts had been fatally compromised.

    “Should we shut this thing down?” Mr. Obama asked, according to members of the president’s national security team who were in the room.

    Told it was unclear how much the Iranians knew about the code, and offered evidence that it was still causing havoc, Mr. Obama decided that the cyberattacks should proceed. In the following weeks, the Natanz plant was hit by a newer version of the computer worm, and then another after that. The last of that series of attacks, a few weeks after Stuxnet was detected around the world, temporarily took out nearly 1,000 of the 5,000 centrifuges Iran had spinning at the time to purify uranium.

    This account of the American and Israeli effort to undermine the Iranian nuclear program is based on interviews over the past 18 months with current and former American, European and Israeli officials involved in the program, as well as a range of outside experts. None would allow their names to be used because the effort remains highly classified, and parts of it continue to this day.
    Última edição por 5ms; 02-06-2012 às 09:03.

  4. #4
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Microsoft Emergency Bulletin: Unauthorized Certificate used in "Flame"

    Microsoft just released an emergency bulletin, and an associated patch, notifying users of Windows that a "unauthorized digital certificates derived from a Microsoft Certificate Authority" was used to sign components of the "Flame" malware.

    The update revokes a total of 3 intermediate certificate authorities:

    • Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA (2 certificates)
    • Microsoft Enforced Licensing Registration Authority CA (SHA1)
    It is not clear from the bulletin, who had access to these intermediate certificates, and if they were abused by an authorized user, or if they were compromised and used by an unauthorized user. Either way: Apply the patch.

    The bulletin also doesn't state if this intermediate certificate authority or certificates derived from it could be used to fake the patch. Microsoft Certificates are used to sign patches, and a compromise could lead to a sever break in the trust chain. The use of a "real" Microsoft certificate is surely going to increase the speculations as to the origin of Flame.

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