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  1. #1
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    Vem aí Google Shopping

    Google Shopping irá substituir formalmente o Google Product Search daqui a alguns meses e somente irá listar os sites de comerciantes que pagarem para serem incluidos. No momento, estão sendo realizados experimentos e durante o verão americano serão executados testes, prevendo-se o lançamento formal nos EUA no outono. Nos demais paises, o fim da inclusão gratuita está programado para acontecer no ano que vem.

    Google justificou que a inclusão paga irá oferecer uma melhor e mais confiável experiência aos usuários.

    Googlevil, antes da versão Pay-to-Play:





    Experimento:

    Última edição por 5ms; 01-06-2012 às 14:47.

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Didn’t Google Hate Paid Inclusion?
    The paid inclusion model will be familiar to many merchants, who know it’s commonly used with other shopping search engines. But it’s new to Google. In fact, it’s a model that Google once fought against, even to the degree of characterizing it as evil. Those days are over. Google Shopping will becomes the fourth “vertical” or topically-focused search engine from Google to use paid inclusion.

    Once Deemed Evil, Google Now Embraces “Paid Inclusion” is my column from yesterday at our sister site Marketing Land. It explains the history of Google’s past opposition to paid inclusion and its reversal over the past year. Of that history, I’ll highlight this part of Google’s 2004 IPO filing, which specifically talked about paid inclusion being bad in terms of shopping search:
    Froogle [what's now called Google Product Search and will be called Google Shopping] enables people to easily find products for sale online. By focusing entirely on product search, Froogle applies the power of our search technology to a very specific task—locating stores that sell the items users seek and pointing them directly to the web sites where they can shop. Froogle users can sort results by price, specify a desired price range and view product photos.Froogle accepts data feeds directly from merchants to ensure that product information is up-to-date and accurate. Most online merchants are also automatically included in Froogle’s index of shopping sites. Because we do not charge merchants for inclusion in Froogle, our users can browse product categories or conduct product searches with confidence that the results we provide are relevant and unbiased.
    I bolded the key part. Eight years ago, Google viewed paid inclusion in general as some type of evil the company should avoid and in particular something that could cause shopping search to have poor relevancy or be biased.
    What happened to cause such a change?
    Google Product Search To Become Google Shopping, Use Pay-To-Play Model

  4. #4
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    "Meanwhile, with Google Play selling content, will Google eventually decide that Google Shopping should make the next logical step and provide transactions, the way that Amazon does? At some point, Google the search engine that is supposed to point to destinations may turn into too much of a destination itself."

  5. #5
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    que saudade da lista telefonica
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  6. #6
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    Vamos ficar com saudades também dos sites de reservas de passagens e hotéis, investimentos ...

    Google Hotel Finder

    Flights - Google Search

    https://www.google.com/advisor/home

    Esses caras não apenas querem atropelar as Páginas Amarelas, mas o Buscapé, Submarino Viagens, etc, etc, etc.

    Comenta-se tanto sobre o Great Firewall da China mas estamos assistindo calados a construção do Great Firewall do Google.
    Última edição por 5ms; 01-06-2012 às 15:46.

  7. #7
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    Google anuncia mudanças no negócio de comércio eletrônico

    O Google revelou nesta quinta-feira grandes mudanças em seu negócio de vendas on-line, que provavelmente se mostrarão controversas no segmento de comércio eletrônico.

    A partir de setembro, os resultados de buscas por produtos para usuários nos Estados Unidos serão influenciados pelo valor pago por vendedores e anunciantes, disse um executivo da empresa. Antes, os resultados eram exibidos principalmente por relevância, e o programa era gratuito.

    A companhia também irá renomear o serviço, atualmente chamado Google Product Search, para Google Shopping.

    "Estamos começando a transição do Google Product Search nos EUA para um modelo puramente comercial", disse o vice-presidente de administração de produtos do Google Shopping, Sameer Samat. "Isso concederá a vendedores maior controle sobre a posição em que seus produtos aparecem no Google Shopping".

    O Google está presente no setor de listagem e busca de produtos há cerca de uma década. Durante esse período, a empresa forneceu a vendedores acesso gratuito a compradores.
    O Google lucrava por meio da exibição de anúncios pagos de produtos junto às listagens orgânicas, ou gratuitas, de outros produtos, de acordo com o presidente-executivo da Mercent, Eric Best. A Mercent ajuda vendedores a disponibilizar seus produtos por meio do Google e de outros sites de comércio on-line, como Amazon.com e eBay.

    "Hoje, esse modelo desaparece", disse Best. "É um grande acontecimento".

    link: Google anuncia mudan
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  8. #8
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    Citação Postado originalmente por Winger Ver Post
    Antes, os resultados eram exibidos principalmente por relevância
    Principalmente? E quais seriam os outros critérios?

  9. #9
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    Uma estorinha para tirar lições e ficar registrada ...

    Case in point: AOL. On May 25, a group of investors known as Starboard Value—which owns 5.3 percent of AOL and is fighting for three seats on the board of directors—published a lengthy critique of the company’s management. The sharpest words were reserved for AOL’s continued, heavy investment in Patch, the company’s network of 863 locally staffed community news sites, which AOL CEO Tim Armstrong founded and sold to AOL after joining the company. In 2011, according to Starboard’s estimates, Patch lost $147 million while generating a mere $13 million in ad revenue—roughly $15,000 per site. “We do not believe Patch is a viable business,” the Starboard report said.

    The skepticism goes beyond AOL. In 2011, Allbritton Communications (the owners of Politico) scaled back its investment in TBD.com, an ambitious hyperlocal news site for the D.C. area. Likewise, Washington Post Co. and New York Times Co. have pulled back from their investments in online local newsgathering. Across the Atlantic, Guardian Media Group shuttered its hyperlocal experiment last year, noting that the project had proven unsustainable.

    A big part of the problem is that display advertising—the expensive banner ads that serve as the financial engine behind most media sites—has fizzled at the local level. According to Starboard, in 2011 AOL executives hoped to sell 80 percent of their Patch ads to restaurants, spas, and other community businesses. Instead, local merchants bought a mere 18 percent. Approximately 70 percent of those who did give Patch a try failed to renew their contracts.

    Starboard argues that cost-conscious local advertisers prefer online ads with an immediate payoff, such as Google search ads, where an advertiser pays only when someone clicks on an ad and can tell whether a click leads to a sale. Banner advertisements are good at gradually building an emotional connection between a consumer and a business—which is not too important if the business is a bed-bug exterminator.

    Exacerbating the situation, the Patch sites include a box of text ads served by Google. Starboard estimates that local businesses can buy a Google text ad on a Patch site for just 5 percent of what Patch’s salespeople ask for a display ad. And big advertisers were never seduced. According to a survey conducted by Starboard, national advertisers consider hyperlocal sites an inefficient way to communicate with large numbers of consumers.

    ...

    From a content perspective, hyperlocal sites simply aren’t essential reading. Matt Booth, head of interactive local media at researcher BIA/Kelsey, says that people tend to use a search engine 109 times a month. They visit local websites one to two times a month. And the advertising dollars follow the traffic. “The question for these hyperlocal sites is how do you get frequency way up,” says Booth. “People only really need or desire these sites a couple times a month. The rest of their information requests are satisfied elsewhere.”

    ...

    Alan Mutter, a media consultant and journalism instructor at the University of California at Berkeley, says that Patch has proven the inherent flaw of the hyperlocal business model—namely that it requires an expensive salesforce to convince small businesses with meager marketing budgets to buy ads on sites with limited consumer appeal. “The economics don’t work,” says Mutter.
    AOL's Patch: Big Losses on Hyperlocal News - Businessweek

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