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  1. #1
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    Olimpiadas 2012: Internet ganha medalha de papelão na disputa por audiência

    Segundo Dan Rayburn, a transmissão dos jogos olimpicos pela Internet não está atraindo o número de espectadores que se imaginava:

    Online video is not replacing TV - NBC delivered 64M streams in the first 6 days of the Olympics, 29M of which were live. Very small numbers
    Números surpreendentes para alguns (e desagradaveis para agências de publicidade e anunciantes) porque o tráfego Internet continua a crescer aceleradamente e transmissão de videos consome uma fatia significativa desse tráfego. Entretanto, Rayburn explica que não é bem assim que a banda toca:

    Consumer Internet traffic continues to grow dramatically, at a 32% CAGR from 2011 through 2016. In fact the forecast itself has grown; in 2011 Cisco projected total 2012 consumer Internet traffic at 24,476 PB/month, but this year’s report shows 2012 at 30,034 PB/month, a 22% upward adjustment in just one year. Not surprisingly, Internet video represents the largest single portion of this for the entire forecast period.

    For the most part all this is still true, but the full story is not quite so simple. As anyone who follows the CDN space closely knows, service based CDNs don’t make a lot of money delivering video. Margins are small, most CDNs aren’t profitable on their video traffic and all CDN vendors are working hard to diversify their revenue away from video only products.

    For video being delivered on-net, or inside the MSO, ISP or carrier network, these kinds of numbers from Cisco are nectar. There is seemingly no end to the growth in video traffic flooding operator networks, so there’s a constant need for products that compress, cache, offload or optimize video traffic, inside the last mile. And since operators are mostly deploying these solutions for cost savings and QoE, with monetization models to follow, vendors that provide these type of platforms inside the network are seeing more growth than service based CDNs.

    While it’s true that video is the largest single source of traffic, it’s far from dominant. At one point the report states that “the sum of all forms of video (TV, video on demand [VoD], Internet, and P2P) will be approximately 86% of global consumer traffic by 2016.” However, this number includes a very large portion of traffic such as peer-to-peer for which the underlying content is assumed to be video but the network traffic is a non-streaming form such as a file transfer, which does not lend itself to video compression, optimization or video-only caching.

    The portion of consumer Internet traffic that is truly streaming video in 2012 is 57%–still significant but far less than the 86% headline–followed by file sharing at 24%, and web, email and data at 18%. What’s more is that the video portion is forecasted to decline slightly to 54% by 2016 (although it continues to grow in absolute terms). If you look at the market today, video-only tools address at most the 57% (declining to 54%) of the total traffic. Meanwhile P2P traffic tools are not thought of as “video” tools at all, even though most of the time the content they help move is video. It’s a fragmented picture and “80/20” rules do not apply.

    We also constantly hear people talk about the growth of mobile data traffic and how mobile is overtaking fixed line traffic. However, according to the VNI numbers, mobile is still a very small fraction of total bits transmitted, comprising 3% today and growing only to 10% by 2016. So while mobile is important, it’s not as big of an opportunity as some make it out to be. In addition, most mobile video consumption takes place over WiFi, not over cellular. Video over 3G and 4G is not taking off as the pricing for these services are far too expensive and carriers have yet to come to the reality that consumers will not pay what they want. Mobile video consumption, especially for long-form video content, is at a stand still not because of technology, but because of the current pricing model and cap limits imposed by carriers.
    So what is the implication of all this? From a traffic management perspective, operators need to deal with video but they cannot afford to have a video-only or mobile-only traffic strategy. Operators who want to provide a high quality of experience for their users and maximize offload must deploy solutions that look at the entire scope of content traffic.

    We tend to gravitate to 80/20 rules because they make our lives simpler, but Cisco’s latest VNI provides a case where the 80/20 rule does not apply. Effective solutions for delivering content need to address the reality of what’s really taking place in the market today and not a simplified story.

  2. #2
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    Achei estranho que a record que faz a cobertura, estaria 100% focada nisso, deixou de exibir o cidade alerta e ontem zapiando os canais, vi que estava passando, até o apresentador (acho que marcelo) comentou que foi surpreendido com a retomada do programa...

    ...a impressão que tive, foi de que a audiencia dos jogos estava meia boca
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  3. #3
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    Chuva, não sei não. A Olimpiada de 2008 bateu recorde de audiência ...

    September 5th, 2008, Hong Kong- The 2008 Beijing Olympics set many world records, with the latest being the Most Watched Games ever. According to latest intelligence from The Nielsen Company1 , the Beijing Olympic Games attracted the cumulative eyeballs of 4.7 billion viewers over the 17 days from August 8 to August 24, ‘out-viewing’ the 3.9 billion who followed the Athens 2004 Games by 21 percent, and the 3.6 billion who tuned in to the Sydney Games in 20002 by 31 percent, or 1.1 billion additional viewers.

    The 4.7 billion viewers who accessed television coverage of the Beijing Olympics officially translates into approximately 70 percent of the world’s population, or more than two in every three people globally.

    As the host nation, China led the world’s viewers with an audience reach of 94 percent along with South Korea, although by number of individual viewers, China – the world’s most populated nation – far exceeded that of any other country. Mexico followed closely with a 93 percent audience reach.
    Nos últimos dias eu venho registrando queda de "hits" nos sites e ontem dei uma olhada nos números do Akamai e eles também estão com tráfego mundial abaixo do normal. Eu acho provável que a Olimpiada possa estar desviando tempo na Internet para outras midias. Vamos ver essa semana e o que acontece após o encerramento ...
    Última edição por 5ms; 05-08-2012 às 19:19.

  4. #4
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    Mesmo com quase toda programação dedicada às Olímpiadas, a Record voltou a ficar em terceiro lugar na audiência pelo segundo domingo consecutivo.

    Segundo o Ibope na Grande São Paulo, a emissora marcou 6,8 pontos de audiência entre 7h e 0h. A Globo liderou soberana com 13,9 pontos e o SBT ficou atrás com 8,8 pontos. Mais uma vez, medalha de bronze para a emissora do bispo.


    Por Lauro Jardim
    Record fica em terceiro na audi

  5. #5
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    Poisé, qualquer coisa esportiva só tem audiência de peso se a Globo entrar na jogada.

  6. #6
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    Aqui em SP, se transmitir jogo do Corinthians até a TV do Lulla fica em primeiro lugar.

  7. #7
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    Dan Rayburn:
    Live streaming of the Olympics only peaked at 500K users. For all the hype about online, that's not very big at all



    How the Olympics played out on YouTube


    When we started preparing for the Olympics last year, we prioritized two things: giving you a front-row experience, and serving you video at the best quality possible. You responded in a huge way:

    Around the world


    • Giving more people access to watch live and recorded events was key. Across the US and 64 countries in Africa and Asia you watched 231 million total streams. Of those, 72 million total streams came from IOC YouTube Channel.



    • At peak, YouTube delivered video for more than half a million livestreams at the same time. That’s 5X the capacity of Wembley Stadium.



    • Live video looked better than ever before, with a 7X improvement in quality based on low buffering and high frame rates.



    In the U.S.


    • We powered online coverage for NBCOlympics.com, delivering more than 159 million total streams.



    • Through NBC’s native apps, 37 percent of views came from mobile devices, and more than half were in HD.




    Última edição por 5ms; 20-08-2012 às 16:14.

  8. #8
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    We observed some interesting patterns during the 2012 European Championships and the Summer Olympics, but maybe even more interesting is that although sporting events of this size sometimes totally swamp the public switched telephone network (PSTN) or mobile phone networks, none of these events showed any alarming Internet traffic trends at the Internet Exchanges. Perhaps this is a sign of the health of the current Internet ecosystem. The fact that it's easy to add or upgrade private interconnects, or capacity at an IXP, combined with using technologies like CDN that limit the amount of bandwidth needed across interdomain links, makes the collection of interconnected networks that we call the Internet handle situations like this quite well.
    https://labs.ripe.net/Members/fergal...-olympics-2012

    Opening Ceremony
    First we looked at the opening ceremony that took place on Friday, 27 July 2012 to see if we observed any changes compared to other weeks. In the graph below, for instance, you can can see the traffic volume at LINX on Fridays. The dotted lines show the three weeks before the Olympics and the week after. The red line shows the Friday of the opening ceremony. The green and the blue line shows the traffic the two weeks after.

    As you can see, the red line looks different from all the others: there is a clear drop in traffic just when the opening ceremony begins at around 20:00 UTC.







    100m men's finalThe 100 men's final on Sunday, 5 August around 20:50 UTC was a widely watched event. Even though the signal is not very clear, the unusual drop in traffic volume as observed at ECIX in Germany during the evening could be attributed to this event (see the green line in Figure 5).

    Última edição por 5ms; 04-09-2012 às 12:50.

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