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  1. #1
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    GlobeNet dobra capacidade através de 40G

    Utilizando tecnologia 40G, a subsidiária da Oi aumentará a capacidade de seu backbone para 1,2Tbps até o final do ano.

    A empresa vem realizando testes com equipamentos 100G de diversos fabricantes, tecnologia que teoricamente possibilitaria um futuro aumento da capacidade do backbone para 12Tbps utilizando 4 pares de fibras.

    Já a concorrente Seaborn Networks, anunciou que assinou contrato com a Alcatel-Lucent para a construção do cabo submarino Seabras-1 na modalidade turnkey. Ligando São Paulo-Fortaleza-New York e com previsão de ativação em 2014, no papel, é o cabo transoceanico mais longo do mundo usando 100G.


    October 10th, 2012 by Robert Powell

    There has been interesting news lately on two fronts from the undersea routes between North and South America.

    GlobeNet, the international arm of Brazil’s Oi, is planning its third substantial upgrade to its network capacity in the past three years and testing the next phase as well. First, they are more than doubling their current lit capacity by moving to 40Gbps waves. That will give them 1.2Tbps in all, with the work to be completed in Q4. Meanwhile, they have been testing 100G gear from multiple vendors, demonstrating an eventual upgraded capacity of more than 12Tbps over its four fiber pairs.

    Meanwhile, Seaborn Networks has signed a turnkey contract with Alcatel-Lucent to build its new cable system. Seabras-1 will hook up New york and Sao Paolo directly, with the obligatory branch at Fortaleza. Timing was not mentioned, but Seaborn and Alcatel-Lucent have already begun the permit acquisition and marine survey work and Seaborn has previously targeted 2014 for activation. The NYC to Sao Paolo link would be the longest 100G transoceanic link to date, although a lot can happen between now and 2014.

    Other projects bringing big bandwidth to Brazil are still in the works, of course, e.g. Telebras, WASACE, South Atlantic Express to name a few. It’s fairly certain that not all will come to fruition. Existing operators like GlobeNet argue that we’re a long, long way from actually demand levels that would justify much of this new construction given advances in technology. But there does seem to be enough momentum for now coming from perceived demand to come from the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016.
    GlobeNet Upgrades to 40G, Seaborn Hires Alcatel-Lucent | Telecom Ramblings
    Última edição por 5ms; 10-10-2012 às 14:03.

  2. #2
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    Isso de que não há demanda é lenda... e se eles acreditassem nisso, não estariam investindo.

  3. #3
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    Eu entendi que a argumentação da Globenet é que antes de lançar novos cabos a tecnologia permite aumentar a capacidade de forma a atender a demanda prevista. Ou seja, para os entrantes é um investimento upfront pesado que vai ter que competir com uma infraestrutura fisica amortizada, que possui uma carteira estabelecida de clientes, contratos de longo prazo, e que pode ter sua capacidade multiplicada rapidamente usando capital de terceiros (financiamento dos fornecedores de equipamentos).

    Quanto a essa perspectiva de tráfego devido a eventos esportivos, considerando a Olimpiada de Londres, parece mais uma justificativa populista para a incompetente estatal (pleonasmo) Telebras pagar bilhões aos amigos do amigo condenado.

    EDIT: Do PR da Oi:

    “The tremendous increase of bandwidth capability further solidifies GlobeNet’s position as a market leader with a superior network infrastructure,” states Erick W. Contag, COO of GlobeNet. “Our network is ready today to support the future growth in Latin America, and in particular Brazil, where we are already seeing an increase in demand for networks to address high performance applications and services, such as 4G/LTE, FFTH, IPTV including HD and 3D video programming, and support of major sporting events taking place in Brazil in the coming years.”
    Última edição por 5ms; 10-10-2012 às 17:34.

  4. #4
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    Citação Postado originalmente por 5ms Ver Post
    Eu entendi que a argumentação da Globenet é que antes de lançar novos cabos a tecnologia permite aumentar a capacidade de forma a atender a demanda prevista. Ou seja, para os entrantes é um investimento upfront pesado que vai ter que competir com uma infraestrutura fisica amortizada, que possui uma carteira estabelecida de clientes, contratos de longo prazo, e que pode ter sua capacidade multiplicada rapidamente usando capital de terceiros (financiamento dos fornecedores de equipamentos).
    Exceto nos segmentos muito longos, como o Fortaleza-Bermudas da Globenet... apesar deles não terem dito, como eles afirmam que vão apenas trocar infra-estrutura em terra, vou assumir que eles vão mesmo deixar esse ramal na velocidade que já tem hoje e contar com a sorte.

    Citação Postado originalmente por 5ms Ver Post
    Quanto a essa perspectiva de tráfego devido a eventos esportivos, considerando a Olimpiada de Londres, parece mais uma justificativa populista para a incompetente estatal (pleonasmo) Telebras pagar bilhões aos amigos do amigo condenado.
    Tráfego de evento esportivo não justifica nenhum investimento especial de longa distância, o crescimento natural já dá o mesmo efeito em poucas semanas. Já concentrações de pessoas, como as de eventos esportivos mas também eventos religiosos e sociais, exigem maior infra-estrutura de *última milha*.

  5. #5
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    Coherent Breathes New Life Into Subsea

    The growing availability of Coherent optical transport systems is closing the gap between terrestrial and subsea network operations and, it seems, significantly reducing the cost of upgrading the capacity of the existing submarine systems that network the world.

    That's great news for subsea network operators looking to upgrade and meet the growing data traffic requirements of their global service provider customers. But it's maybe not such great news for those companies eager to meet international network capacity demand by laying new ocean cables.

    Infinera Corp. Vice President Mike Guess estimates the upgrade cost of subsea cables has come down by a magnitude of between five and 50 times, depending on the network. That's a major reason for the slowdown in new cable builds, despite a global growth in bandwidth demand of 40 percent during the past year.

    The main reason is that coherent technology enables submarine links to be upgraded without having to rip and replace the land-based electronics. Coherent offers greater receiver sensitivity, which means extra reach and capacity -- critical for longhaul systems.

    Andrew Hankins, head of engineering at Telstra Corp. Ltd.'s Global unit, says the greater spectral efficiency "allow[s] us to put more capacity onto an existing cable," resulting in both lower unit cost and a longer economic lifetime.

    The introduction of coherent capabilities has enabled the industry to upgrade from 10-Gbit/s wavelengths, which had been the standard for more than a decade, straight to 100 Gbit/s. Infinera's Guess says the subsea industry has been wanting to upgrade capacity for a long time, "but the problem was making [new systems] reach as far as 10G." Coherent, he says, "has the performance base to make 100G practical."

    Upgrades to 40 Gbit/s also appear to be benefiting from coherent technology too.

    It also enables operators to integrate their terrestrial and subsea networks, with the savings and flexibility that that allows. Even today submarine cables are mostly managed as point-to-point networks. "Coherent takes out a lot of the propagation effect," Ciena Corp. CTO Steve Alexander told a recent industry event. "Suddenly your wet plant and dry plant all look the same."

    Because it's a technology that can be used for all networks, and not just the small subsea segment, vendors are also reaping economies of scale. Eric Handa, co-founder of consultancy APTelecom, says the cost of upgrading a transatlantic cable has fallen about 75 percent in recent years, and by about 50 to 60 percent in the Pacific.

    That's having an impact on the subsea construction sector and making life tougher for traditional players such as Alcatel-Lucent and Fujitsu Ltd.

    Vendors such as Ciena, Infinera and Xtera Communications Inc. are now battling for upgrade deals, increasing competition and driving prices down. "The traditional turnkey model is being turned upside down," Handa says.

    In the past, a firm such as Alcatel-Lucent -- the current subsea networks market leader -- would supply and install both the cable and the electronics. Now, though, that's not necessarily the case, though the incumbents are still picking up new business.

    Julian Rawle, managing partner at Pioneer Consulting LLC , agrees that the boundaries between subsea and terrestrial "are being blurred and they may disappear completely."

    Yet while the economics of long-haul undersea cable construction appear to be improving, the number of unsuccessful cable proposals is increasing, according to Rawle. "The gap between the number that get proposed versus the number that get built has widened considerably in the past five years," he says.

    That's mainly because it's become harder to raise the necessary capital since the financial crisis, Rawle believes. "Banks appear to be a lot more risk-averse. There are good projects out there with a viable business case that are not getting funded."

    The option to upgrade existing plant and the squeeze on capital for new projects means times are getting harder for the marine side of the business, with Rawle suggesting that industry rationalization "is a possibility."

    — Robert Clark, contributing editor, special to Light Reading

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