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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    15,000

    EUA: 60% das transmissões de video na Internet tem qualidade degradada

    A imprensa americana frequentemente publica que os consumidores dos EUA estão migrando para planos de conteudo online e cancelando suas assinaturas de TV a cabo -- "cord cutting" -- para em seguida noticiar que o número de assinantes dos pacotes de TV paga está aumentando.

    Uma questão raramente discutida é: a qualidade e confiabilidade da transmissão de conteudo pela Internet é comparável com a qualidade da transmissão via TV a cabo?

    Em 2012, a Conviva analizou 22.6 bilhões de streams transmitidos pelos maiores provedores de conteudo da Internet, entre eles Netflix, ESPN, HBO, Viacom, VEVO, MLB, USA e NBC, que respondem por cerca de 75% do tráfego da Internet, excluido o tráfego das propriedades do Google. Os provedores de conteudo clientes da Conviva acrescentam aos seus players código que permite a Conviva monitorar em tempo real indicadores da experiência do usuário assistindo o video.

    O que a Conviva encontrou?

    Degradação da qualidade em 60% das transmissões. Interrupções para re-buffering em 20% das transmissões, 20% com demora para o video iniciar. 40% das transmissões apresentaram ruidos ou imagens de baixa resolução. 125 bilhões de minutos foram gastos com buffering. Mais de 18% dos usuários que solicitaram assistir eventos ao vivo abandonaram a transmissão antes do video começar.

    Conviva’s data shows that a staggering 60% of views were impacted by stalls, low resolution or buffering. 39.3% of streams were impacted by buffering and 4% never started. That’s over 900 million streams that never started! Ironically, for all the talk of HD, Conviva’s data showed that many consumers are watching on a screen capable of displaying high-quality (HQ) video, yet 63% are viewing below HQ resolution. And when it comes to buffering, for a live event lasting 90 minutes, Conviva’s data showed that 10.8 minutes of that content didn’t work thanks to buffering. Can you imagine turning on the TV to watch a movie and not being able to see 12% of it?
    Think Streaming Will Replace Cable TV? This Data On Streaming Quality Proves Otherwise - Dan Rayburn - StreamingMediaBlog.com
    Última edição por 5ms; 01-05-2013 às 15:08.

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,000

    The New Economics of TV

    Many regard TV as a dinosaur of the past. With the rise of social media and other new technology platforms, new media types predict that its days are numbered, soon to be buried under an avalanche of disruptive change.

    ...

    For all the talk about cord cutting, viewership remains strong and TV’s share of the ad market is actually higher than it was a decade ago. In fact, the industry is going through a renaissance of sorts, where old models are mixing with new ones to create a vibrant new marketplace for content.

    ...

    However, a basic principle of media economics is that marketers are willing to pay more for consumers than consumers will pay for content. So the ad market, although it can be volatile, tends to rise on a per capita basis as economic productivity grows. Consequently, over time it becomes possible to support bigger production budgets with smaller audiences.

    ...

    The rise of cable TV led to an abundance of channels. With a relative scarcity of content on air, well-heeled consumers were happy to pay a little bit more for recent movies and live sporting events not available on broadcast TV. By the 90’s, premium cable channels like HBO and Showtime had built up large subscriber bases.

    ...

    However, as Rebecca Greenfield recently explained in The Atlantic, the economics of premium cable channels might be breaking down. Streaming services like Netflix don’t have to split fees with cable companies, so can earn more revenue while charging the consumer less, which will allow them to outbid their incumbent rivals in the years to come.

    ...

    Probably the biggest change in the economics of video content has to do with distribution. In the era of the big three networks and one screen (literally – few houses had more than one TV), programming needed to appeal to a wide audience. The rise of cable brought niche programming to the fore, but development executives remained formidable gatekeepers.

    These days, anyone with a smartphone can shoot a video and put it online, but with the price of cinematic quality cameras falling tenfold, even high quality production is not out of the reach of dedicated hobbyists. This is enabling an entire new ecosystem of players who can produce, distribute and compete for advertising and subscription dollars.

    ...

    Silicon Valley veteran Ron Bloom thinks he can offer an alternative to YouTube by developing an online network dedicated to professional content. His company, Bitesize Networks, produces hundreds of snack size videos every month. While it may seem like a quixotic idea, Bloom is pretty happy with the way things are going.

    Since starting in 2006 and investing $40 million (much of it his own money), he’s been profitable for 4 years, growing 30%-50% annually and hopes revenues will near $100 million this year. He’s recently even built a showcase studio right on the “Walk of Fame” in Hollywood in much the same style that NBC made famous with the “Today” show.

    ...

    Possibly the most innovative new model is Amazon Studios, which crowdsources content ideas and then professionally produces ones that look promising.

    ...

    What’s really interesting is that Amazon doesn’t seem to have any big plans to sell ads or even to charge for content-only subscriptions, but will allow consumers to view original programming with an ordinary prime subscription. In a certain sense, Amazon Studios serves an incredibly elaborate form of content marketing to sell books, electronics and household goods.

    And Amazon is not alone. Microsoft recently launched Xbox Interactive studios which will produce content designed to fully leverage the interactive capabilities of Kinect and Intel announced a partnership with Ashton Kutcher. Like Amazon, it’s not ads or even content subscriptions they’re after, but to entice consumers to adopt their technology platform.

    This is potentially incredibly disruptive. In the old days, TV networks only had to compete with other TV networks to persuade top-notch talent to produce for them. Then premium channels like HBO raised the bar. In a few years, their ability to procure top quality content might hinge on the profitability of completely separate businesses, like books and video games.

    ...

    One thing that I learned running media businesses in a variety of markets and contexts is that business models are not set in stone. What are often seen as concrete principles are often merely arbitrary manifestations of time, place and accident.
    The New Economics of TV - Forbes

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