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  1. #1
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    [EN] Intel lança Atom C2000 visando data centers

    Within the Atom Series-C processor family the configurations are highly optimized for the target workload – ranging from 2 cores and 6 watts for entry level web hosting, 4 cores and 9 or 14 watts for cold storage, and 8 cores and 12 or 20 watts for front end web tier (scale-out workloads).

    Intel also announced the commercial availability of technology enabling a “disaggregated rack” combining Intel’s servers and silicon photonics technology with new cabling products from Corning to create a high-speed networking architecture. Microsoft said it intends to integrate the silicon photonics technology into its future data centers. The technology has also been tested with Facebook, Rackspace and Baidu.


    Intel is bringing its low-power Atom chips to the cloud. Today the chipmaker unveiled products based on the new Atom C2000, a low-power chip previously known by the codename Avoton. The new chip is designed to bring the power efficiency of mobile phones into the hyperscale environments of cloud data centers. Intel said the new 22nm chip will also allow it to expand into areas such as cold storage and entry-level networking, which loom as growth markets as data center operators look beyond servers to improve power efficiency across their entire infrastructure.



    “As the world becomes more and more mobile, the pressure to support billions of devices and users is changing the very composition of data centers,” said Diane Bryant, senior vice president and general manager of the Datacenter and Connected Systems Group at Intel. “With the Atom C2000, we are signaling Intel’s shift from general-purpose solution delivery to optimized, targeted products that address a range of specialized workloads to delvier greater efficiency to the data center.”


    Intel also announced the commercial availability of technology enabling a “disaggregated rack” combining Intel’s servers and silicon photonics technology with new cabling products from Corning to create a high-speed networking architecture. Microsoft said it intends to integrate the silicon photonics technology into its future data centers. The technology has also been tested with Facebook, Rackspace and Baidu.


    Bryant said Intel is driving “a fundamental transformation of the rack” in which high-speed networking provides data center designers with new options to distribute components and workloads.

    New Applications, New Frontiers for Intel

    The Atom C2000, formerly code named Avoton, is positioned as low power, and application optimized for data centers and communications. It is Intel’s second generation 64-bit server SoC, manufactured using a 22nm process, and is the first processor based on the next generation Silvermont architecture. With a focus on high density and high performance, this Atom processor will continue Intel’s drive into the micro server markets and cloud service provider architecture, and extend it into new segments. As a scalable building block, Intel is looking to fit the Atom into new markets such as cold storage, routers and switches, network security appliances, and many other areas.


    “What we have seen is the emergence of new applications at the low end of compute,” said Bryant, citing use cases like memcached and cold storage that require a combination of high density and low compute power.


    Intel is delivering 13 specific models with customized features and accelerators optimized for particular lightweight workloads such as dedicated hosting, distributed memory caching, static web serving and content delivery to ensure greater efficiency.


    Within the Atom Series-C processor family the configurations are highly optimized for the target workload – ranging from 2 cores and 6 watts for entry level web hosting, 4 cores and 9 or 14 watts for cold storage, and 8 cores and 12 or 20 watts for front end web tier (scale-out workloads). With the Silvermont modular design, the AtomC2000 can have 2 to 8 Silvermont cores, with shared 1MB L2 per module, or 4MB. Avoton supports up to 2 channels of DDR3/DDr3L memory, with 25.6GB/s of peak bandwidth.


    Not just a typical iteration above last year’s Centerton, the new Avoton with additional SoC functionality takes a large leap forward in power efficiency – with as much as a 65 percent improvement over the previous generation. It also adds jumps from 8GB of memory to 32GB, and includes integrated NIC, SATA and USB.


    The Disaggregated Rack

    Intel also demonstrated the first operational Intel Rack Scale Architecture (RSA)-based rack with Intel Silicon Photonics Technology in combination with the disclosure of a new MXC connector and ClearCurve optical fiber developed by Corning.


    With changes in technologies binge incorporated into the chip, and platform enhancements to ensure high density and low power, the data center rack itself is a final area for Intel to address. Intel has visions for replacing the traditional data center rack, as evidenced by the Scorpio rack scale architecture, and Intel’s involvement in the Open Compute rack design. Intel’s disaggregated rack environment includes Intel processors and SoCs, distributed switching with Intel switch silicon, and interconnects based on Intel silicon photonics technlogies.


    At the Intel Re-architect the data center event this past summer Rackspace was noted as one of the first commercial deployments of the OpenCompute rack scale implementations.The micro server and disaggregated rack have also been featured in Intel partnerships with HP’s Moonshot, which is expected to have the new Atom C2000 processor, and with Quanta Computer in building out the new Intel photonic rack architecture.


    The Atom C2000 chips (Avoton and Rangeley) are available now. They will be followed in 2014 with code name Denverton processors, using Intel’s 14nm process and further build upon the performance and efficiency gains ihn the 22nm Avoton.


    The Intel Atom C2000 product family is shipping to customers now with more than 50 designs for microservers, cold storage and networking. The products are expected to be available in the coming months from vendors including Advantech, Dell, Ericsson, HP, NEC, Newisys, Penguin Computing, Portwell, Quanta, Supermicro, WiWynn, Tyan, ZNYX Networks.

    Intel Targets Cloud Data Centers with New Atom C2000 Chips | Data Center Knowledge

  2. #2
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    One of the world's largest hosters, OVH will be a first mover in deploying atom c2000 for entry hosting, cold storage and caching.
    Raejeanne Skillern
    @RaejeanneS

    Dir Cloud Mktg, Intel

  3. #3
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    Intel launches Avoton as Atom C2000 system on a chip for data centres

    Intel has officially unveiled its Atom C2000 family of processors aimed at microservers and the communications infrastructure market. Claimed to offer double the performance or five times the power efficiency of existing Atom S1200 chips, the new line is designed to fill a different niche to its Xeon family, Intel said.

    Based on the Silvermont core, the new C2000 family is Intel's second generation of 64-bit Atom system on a chip (SoC) products aimed at the data centre instead of the mobile market. It is split into two families; chips codenamed Avoton aimed at microservers and those codenamed Rangeley aimed at routers and other network devices.

    On the Avoton side, Atom C2000 chips will be available in two, four and eight core versions with clock speeds up to 2.4GHz and power envelopes (TDP) of 6W up to 20W for the top-end chip. Memory support is up to 64GB of DDR3 or DDR3L.

    The new 22nm Atom chips are designed to complement Intel's Xeon family of processors, the firm said. While Xeon targets traditional server workloads, the Atom server chips are aimed at scale-out workloads and applications where a high density of compact, power-efficient servers is desirable.

    However, Intel is also keen to emphasise the software compatibility across its entire range of server chips, pointing out that "the same OS and the same applications can run everywhere". This is a dig at chip rival ARM, which is also moving into the scale-out data centre arena, but faces challenges in building a software ecosystem for its architecture comparable with that which has built up around x86 processors.

    Intel claims that the Atom C2000 offers a "pretty drastic" improvement over the Atom S1200, with single-threaded performance gains of 1.9x to 14x higher, depending on benchmarks, and performance-per-watt between 3.8x and 10.3x greater.

    When compared to ARM server chips, Intel claimed that Atom C2000 offers anything from 3.9x up to 35.6x the performance, depending on benchmarks.

    As an SoC design, the Avoton chips also feature integrated system I/O, which includes 16 lanes of PCI Express (PCIe), USB ports and six Sata ports for connecting storage, plus legacy I/O.

    Also integrated is a version of Intel's Powerville Ethernet controller, offering four ports capable of operating at 1Gbps or 2.5Gbps each.

    This integration enables an Atom C2000 to offer the same functionality in a single chip that required up to four chips with the Atom S1200 Centerton platform, according to Intel.

    As a consequence, a typical 42U rack loaded with Atom C2000 microservers can have up to 3x the density of the Atom S1200 generation, Intel claims, with anything from 400 up to 1,400 nodes.

    The integrated I/O is connected up using a special on-chip transport Intel has developed for SoCs called Intel on-chip system fabric (IOSF). This is designed to be compatible with PCIe, according to Intel, following PCIe headers and ordering rules.

    The upshot of this is that on-chip devices such as the Ethernet controller appear to software to be standard discrete components connected by a PCIe bus, and can thus use existing drivers and software.

    For servers, the Avoton chips fit into a platform called Edisonville that supports a new stacked Dimm connector design, allowing for higher memory densities, plus the reliability, availability and serviceability (RAS) features that enterprises require, according to Intel.

    The Rangely Atom C2000 chips are similar to Avoton, but have thermal profiles and reliability optimised for embedded use in routers, switches and security appliances.

    In addition, Rangeley chips feature QuickAssist Technology accelerators for various functions, including AES and DES encryption plus authentication hash functions.

    While the Atom C2000 family is just shipping, Intel is already looking to the next generation. Next year the firm plans to deliver a successor codenamed Denverton that will be fabricated on a 14nm process technology.

    To complement this there will be a 14nm Xeon chip codenamed Broadwell, along with a Broadwell SoC - the first ever SoC in the Xeon family, Intel said.
    Intel launches Avoton as Atom C2000 system on a chip for data centres - IT News from V3.co.uk

  4. #4
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    Intel Aims to "Re-Architect" Datacenters to Meet Demand for New Services

    New Era of Services-Oriented Datacenters Gives Opportunities for Expansion

    NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

    • Reveals new details of the forthcoming 22nm Intel® Atom™ processors C2000 product family, enabling the company to target a larger portion of the datacenter market.
    • Unveils future roadmap of 14nm datacenter products including a system-on-chip (SoC) that for the first time will incorporate Intel's next-generation Broadwell architecture to address an even broader range of workloads.
    • Rackspace Hosting*announces that it will deploy a new generation of rack designs as part of its hybrid cloud solutions aligned with Intel's Rack Scale Architecture vision.




    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., July 22, 2013 – As the massive growth of information technology services places increasing demand on the datacenter, Intel Corporation today outlined its strategy to re-architect the underlying infrastructure, allowing companies and end-users to benefit from an increasingly services-oriented, mobile world.

    The company also announced additional details about its next-generation Intel® Atom™ processor C2000 product family (codenamed "Avoton" and "Rangeley"), as well as outlined its roadmap of next-generation 14nm products for 2014 and beyond. This robust pipeline of current and future products and technologies will allow Intel to expand into new segments of the datacenter that look to transition from proprietary designs to more open, standards-based compute models.

    "Datacenters are entering a new era of rapid service delivery," said Diane Bryant, senior vice president and general manager of the Datacenter and Connected Systems Group at Intel. "Across network, storage and servers we continue to see significant opportunities for growth. In many cases, it requires a new approach to deliver the scale and efficiency required, and today we are unveiling the near and long-term actions to enable this transformation."

    As more mobile devices connect to the Internet, cloud-based software and applications get smarter by learning from the billions of people and machines using it, thus resulting in a new era of context-rich experiences and services. It also results in a massive amount of network connections and a continuous stream of real-time, unstructured data. New challenges for networks, computing and storage are emerging as the growing volume of data is transported, collected, aggregated and analyzed in datacenters. As a result, datacenters must be more agile and service-driven than ever before, and easier to manage and operate.

    The role of information technology has evolved from being a way to reduce costs and increase corporate productivity to becoming the means to deliver new services to businesses and consumers. For example, Disney* recently started providing visitors with wirelessly connected-wristbands to enhance customers' in-park experience through real-time data analytics. Additionally, a smart traffic safety program from Bocom* in China seeks to identify traffic patterns in a city of ten million people and intelligently offers better routing options for vehicles on the road.

    'Re-Architecting' Network, Storage and Servers
    To help companies prepare for the next generation of datacenters, Intel revealed its plans to virtualize the network, enable smart storage solutions and invest in innovative rack optimized architectures.

    Bryant highlighted Intel's Rack Scale Architecture (RSA), an advanced design that promises to dramatically increase the utilization and flexibility of the datacenter to deliver new services. Rackspace Hosting*, an open cloud company, today announced the deployment of new server racks that is a step toward reaching Intel's RSA vision, powered by Intel® Xeon® processors and Intel Ethernet controllers with storage accelerated by Intel Solid State Drives. The Rackspace design is the first commercial rack scale implementation.

    The networking industry is on the verge of a transition similar to what the server segment experienced years ago. Equipping the network with open, general purpose processing capabilities provides a way to maximize network bandwidth, significantly reduce cost and provide the flexibility to offer new services. For example, with a virtualized software defined network, the time to provision a new service can be reduced to just minutes from two to three weeks with traditional networks. Intel introduced Open Network Platform reference designs to help OEMs build and deploy this new generation of networks.

    Data growth is a challenge to all datacenters and transferring this large volume of data for processing within a traditional, rigid storage architecture is costly and time consuming. By implementing intelligent storage technologies and tools, Intel is helping to reduce the amount of data that needs to be stored, and is improving how data is used for new services.

    Traditional servers are also evolving. To meet the diverse needs of datacenter operators who deploy everything from compute intensive database applications to consumer facing Web services that benefit from smaller, more energy-efficient processing, Intel outlined its plan to optimize workloads, including customized CPU and SoC configurations.

    As part of its strategy, Intel revealed new details for the forthcoming Intel® Atom™ processors C2000 product family aimed for low-energy, high-density microservers and storage (codenamed "Avoton"), and network devices (codenamed "Rangeley"). This second generation of Intel's 64-bit SoCs is expected to become available later this year and will be based on the company's 22nm process technology and the innovative Silvermont microarchitecture. It will feature up to eight cores with integrated Ethernet and support for up to 64GB of memory.

    The new products are expected to deliver up to four times1,3 the energy efficiency and up to seven times1,2 more performance than the first generation Intel Atom processor-based server SoCs introduced in December last year. Intel has been sampling the new Intel Atom processor server product family to customers since April and has already more than doubled the number of system designs compared to the previous generation.

    Roadmap for Expansion
    The move to services-oriented datacenters presents considerable opportunities for Intel to expand into new segments. To help bolster the underlying technologies that power much of the next generation of datacenters, Intel outlined its roadmap of next-generation products based on its forthcoming 14nm process technology scheduled for 2014 and beyond. These products are aimed at microservers, storage and network devices and will offer an even broader set of low-power, high-density solutions for their Web-scale applications and services.

    The future products include the next generation of Intel Xeon processors E3 family (codenamed "Broadwell") built for processor and graphic-centric workloads such as online gaming and media transcoding. It also includes the next generation of Intel Atom processor SoCs (codenamed "Denverton") that will enable even higher density deployments for datacenter operators. Intel also disclosed an addition to its future roadmap – a new SoC designed from the ground up for the datacenter based on Intel's next-generation Broadwell microarchitecture that follows today's industry leading Haswell microarchitecture. This SoC will offer higher levels of performance in high density, extreme energy efficient systems that datacenter operators will expect in this increasingly services-oriented, mobile world.

    Intel Aims to "Re-Architect" Datacenters to Meet Demand for New Services

  5. #5
    Louco pelo WHT Brasil
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    Intel Atom C2000 Family Brief
    Aqui diz que o máximo de memória é 32 GB mas no brief diz que é 64 GB.
    Última edição por hasore; 05-09-2013 às 13:49.

  6. #6
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    Citação Postado originalmente por hasore Ver Post
    Intel Atom C2000 Family Brief
    Aqui diz que o máximo de memória é 32 GB mas no brief diz que é 64 GB.
    No Family Brief o máximo varia de 16GB a 64GB

    Product Family for Microservers

    C2750 - 64GB

    C2730 - 32GB

    C2550 - 64GB

    C2530 - 32GB

    C2350 - 16GB

    No citado link "aqui" -- Intel-Atom Processor C2750 4M Cache 2.40 GHz :

    Max Memory Size (dependent on memory type) 64 GB

    Memory Types DDR3, 3L 1600

    Physical Address Extensions 36-bit

    Talvez você tenha acessado o link de um C*30 e não o postado (C2750)
    Última edição por 5ms; 05-09-2013 às 14:22.

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