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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    [EN] U.S. Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against Baidu

    Judge Furman likened a search engine’s “editorial judgment” to that of a newspaper editor who decides which stories to publish.



    Baidu, the operator of China’s most widely used Internet search engine, has won the dismissal of a United States lawsuit by pro-democracy activists who complained that the company illegally suppressed political speech.

    Eight New York writers and video producers had accused Baidu of creating search engine algorithms, at the behest of the Chinese government, to block users in the United States from viewing articles, videos and other information advocating greater democracy in China.

    ...

    United States District Judge Jesse M. Furman in Manhattan concluded Thursday that the results produced by Baidu’s search engine constituted protected free speech under the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, warranting dismissal of the lawsuit, filed in May 2011.

    “The First Amendment protects Baidu’s right to advocate for systems of government other than democracy (in China or elsewhere) just as surely as it protects plaintiffs’ rights to advocate for democracy,” the judge wrote.

    ...

    Stephen Preziosi, a lawyer for the activists, said his clients would appeal. “The court has laid out a perfect paradox: That it will allow the suppression of free speech, in the name of free speech,” he said in an interview.

    ...

    The importance of the decision is that Baidu, along with other search engines like Google, Yahoo and Bing, has the same editorial rights as print publications and can choose whether or not to publish people’s writings, said Carey Ramos, of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, Baidu’s lead attorney for the case.

    “That rights extends to Internet media as well as print media. And it protects Chinese media as much as American media,” Mr. Ramos said. “The plaintiffs sued Baidu saying, ‘You’re violating our First Amendment rights because you don’t include our writings in your search results,’ but the court said, ‘No, you’ve got it backwards, your lawsuit violates Baidu’s First Amendment rights by asking the court to penalize Baidu for not returning the results you want.’ ”

    ...
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/29/bu...ch-engine.html
    Última edição por 5ms; 28-03-2014 às 10:15.

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,028
    Essa é uma decisão que frusta aqueles que pensam sites de busca como empresas isentas, mas o sentimento de decepção desses "8 escritores e produtores de video de NY" e dos militantes "pró-democracia na China" (ironia), deve ser bem parecido com o dos milhões de americanos que, usando o Google, não conseguem localizar artigos desfavoráveis a alguns politicos amigões da empresa, devidamente (e legalmente, pelo visto) retirados da lista de resultados.

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