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  1. #1
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    [EN] Twitter and Facebook: Little Influence on TV Watching

    Only 16.1 percent of the survey respondents said they had used social media while watching TV during prime time. And less than half of the people using social media were actually discussing the show they were watching.

    Facebook was by far the most popular social network for people chatting during shows, used by about 11.4 percent of TV watchers, compared with 3.3 percent for Twitter.

    The research findings contradict the notion — peddled heavily by Twitter and Facebook in their pitches to producers — that conversations on Twitter and Facebook are a big factor driving people to tune into TV shows.

    Listen to executives at Twitter and Facebook talk about how we watch television and you might walk away thinking that Americans are chattering nonstop on the social networks while watching their favorite shows.

    The reality is that most of us don’t tweet or post at all while we’re plopped in front of the tube. When we do, half the time we’re talking about something other than TV. And social media conversation is far weaker than traditional factors, like TV commercials for new shows or our sheer laziness in changing channels, in prompting us to tune into each season’s new offerings.

    Those are among the crucial findings of a new study to be released Thursday by the Council for Research Excellence, a Nielsen-funded group that does in-depth research on how Americans use media that is shared with its member broadcasters, advertisers, publishers and social media companies.

    The council surveyed 1,665 respondents, ages 15 to 54, who were selected to be representative of the online population. The participants used a mobile app to report any time they saw, heard or communicated something about prime-time TV shows over the course of 21 days last fall, as the new season’s lineup of TV shows made their debuts.

    Only 16.1 percent of the survey respondents said they had used social media while watching TV during prime time. And less than half of the people using social media were actually discussing the show they were watching.

    Facebook was by far the most popular social network for people chatting during shows, used by about 11.4 percent of TV watchers, compared with 3.3 percent for Twitter.

    The research findings contradict the notion — peddled heavily by Twitter and Facebook in their pitches to producers — that conversations on Twitter and Facebook are a big factor driving people to tune into TV shows.

    “Social media did have an impact on viewing choice, but it was still relatively small compared to traditional promotion,” said Beth Rockwood, senior vice president for market resources at Discovery Communications, who is the chairwoman of the research group’s social media committee.

    Only 6.8 percent of the respondents said that something on a social network pushed them to tune into a new prime time show.

    Nearly 40 percent of respondents said TV commercials for a new show prompted them to tune in, and about one-third said they watched because it was a program they already watched regularly.

    Even the couch potato factor was more important than Twitter or Facebook: About one in 10 people said they checked out a new show because it was appearing on the channel they were already watching.

    The researchers did find some groups that were big into social TV chatter. Generally, women, Hispanics and people aged 25 to 34 were more likely to watch and post. Male, Asian and black viewers, as well as people aged 45 to 54, were less likely to chat about social TV.

    Also, the council said that about 22 percent of the whole survey group were “superconnectors,” defined as people who actively follow shows and actors on social media and comment or interact with them several times a day.

    Those superconnectors were significantly more active on social media than other people, suggesting that advertisers and TV producers might want to find ways to better target those people with their social media promotions.

    “The superconnectors are an important group to think about,” Ms. Rockwood said.

    And live events, like awards shows, drew more social media chatter — an area that Twitter views as a particular strength.

    “The Emmies were a real standout in the period we were surveying,” Ms. Rockwood said.
    http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/0...on-tv-watching

  2. #2
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    Google Says Digital Activity Impacts Television Viewing

    Google and YouTube say they have a significant impact on television viewing.

    E se for o contrário?

    Parece reação de relações públicas à publicação do estudo do post anterior.

    Esses caras parecem desesperados -- outro dia ameaçaram "destruir" as TVs locais sugando verbas de propaganda. Parece que esqueceram que o "sucesso" das empresas "de Internet" se deve aos veiculos tradicionais, não o contrário. Nenhuma empresa alcançou notoriedade porque era bem posicionada nos resultados de busca ou porque anunciava na Internet. Vide a história do Twitter.

    At a time when Twitter and Facebook are scrambling to get closer to TV networks and their advertisers, Google says in a new research report that 90% of TV viewers also visit Google and YouTube and that online behavior is a clear indicator of a show’s popularity.

    “In an effort to identify how digital has impacted viewer behavior in this new era, we analyzed search queries, video views, and engagement metrics from a sample of 100 cable and network television shows,” Google said. The results of the study have been published in a report called The Role of Digital in TV Research, Fanship, and Viewing.

    “Digital platforms have fundamentally changed the way that TV viewers research, participate in and access their favorite shows. Search, video and engagement activities, which show a positive correlation to viewership, can provide additional insight into a show’s popularity,” according to the report.

    TV related searches on Google have grown 16%, and on YouTube, TV related searches are up 54% from last year.

    Video views, time spent watching and engagement with TV-related content are also up, which Google says suggests that TV viewers are using these platforms to interact with other fans and engage with shows.

    Much of the growth is coming from searches on mobile phones and tablets. Searches on phones are up 100% as people look for information about premiere dates, plot information and cast lists.

    "Digital platforms are changing the way today’s viewer experiences television,” the report says. “From sharing the new viral Jimmy Kimmel Live video to watching the promo for the premiere of The Walking Dead to searching for the actor who plays the funny cop on Brooklyn Nine-Nine, one thing is clear: There are more ways than ever for TV audiences to research, participate in and access television content.”

    Google says that 70% of viewers catch up on prior episodes before tuning in to a new season of a show. Catch up related searches on Google in the two months before a season starts are up 50% year-over-year. And of the people who catch up, 4 of 5 say they’re more likely to tune in to a season premiere.

    Subscribers to TV networks’ official YouTube channels rose 69% during 2013.

    YouTube users create a large volume of TV related content. For example, for every video uploaded on YouTube by HBO for Game of Thrones, YouTube members uploaded 82. On average, the YouTube community creates seven pieces of video for every one video a network uploads for a show.

    The full report is available at Think with Google.

    http://www.broadcastingcable.com/new...viewing/130408
    Última edição por 5ms; 10-04-2014 às 17:05.

  3. #3
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    The Need for Traditional Media

    Published: Aug 17, 2013

    Matthew Nisbet talks about his research and reveals some interesting findings in this traditional media speech.

    Nisbet says that there is a need for traditional media, especially in terms of blogging, and uses his research to back up his claim.

    Nisbet states that research shows that 90 percent of news or popular discussions on platforms such as blogs, Facebook or Twitter are linked back to traditional media sources. This is certainly surprising, because many people think of social media as a replacement for these traditional media sources.

    Nisbet claims that bloggers and Internet users still rely on journalists and traditional media sources to gather information and share it with the world. A lot of the news discussed on social media platforms has been taken from traditional media sources, and reworded.
    http://www.trendhunter.com/keynote/t...l-media-speech


  4. #4
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    Traditional social networks fueled Twitter’s spread

    Site’s U.S. growth relied primarily on media attention, geographic proximity of users.

    We’ve all heard it: The Internet has flattened the world, allowing social networks to spring up overnight, independent of geography or socioeconomic status. Who needs face time with the people around you when you can email, text or tweet to and from almost anywhere in the world? Twitter, the social networking and microblogging site, is said to have more than 300 million users worldwide who follow, forward and respond to each other’s 140-character tweets about anything and everything, 24/7.

    But MIT researchers who studied the growth of the newly hatched Twitter from 2006 to 2009 say the site’s growth in the United States actually relied primarily on media attention and traditional social networks based on geographic proximity and socioeconomic similarity. In other words, at least during those early years, birds of a feather flocked — and tweeted — together.

    In their study of Twitter’s “contagion process,” the researchers looked at data from 16,000 U.S. cities, focusing on the 408 with the highest number of Twitter users and seeking to update traditional models of how information spreads and technology is adopted.

    Just as marketing experts sometimes label consumers as early adopters, early majority adopters, late majority adopters or laggards, the researchers characterized cities in those terms, based on when Twitter accounts in a given city reached critical mass. Critical mass is generally defined as the point when something reaches 13.5 percent of the population, which for this study was 13.5 percent of the highest total number of Twitter users in a city through August 2009, the end of the study period.

    As with most technologies, the growth in popularity initially spread via young, tech-savvy “innovators,” in this case from Twitter’s birthplace in San Francisco to greater Boston. But the site’s popularity then took a more traditional route of traveling only short distances, implying face-to-face interactions; this approach made early adopters of Somerville, Mass., and Berkeley, Calif. — cities close to Boston and San Francisco, respectively. Twitter use then spread through early majority cities such as Santa Fe and Los Angeles and late majority cities such as Baltimore and Las Vegas before reaching laggards such as Palm Beach, Fla., and Newark, N.J. All these cities ultimately ranked among the 408 nationwide with the largest numbers of Twitter accounts.

    “Even on the Internet where we may think the world is flat, it’s not,” says Marta González, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and engineering systems at MIT, who is co-author of a paper on this subject appearing this month in the journal PLoS ONE. “The big question for people in industry is ‘How do we find the right person or hub to adopt our new app so that it will go viral?’ But we found that the lone tech-savvy person can’t do it; this also requires word of mouth. The social network needs geographical proximity. … In the U.S. anyway, space and similarity matter.”


    Each circle represents a U.S. city containing Twitter users. As time goes on, circles grow in size as more users sign up in that location. When a location has reached a 'critical mass' of users, or 13.5 percent of all eventual users have signed up, the location turns red. The line being drawn across the center of the screen is a time series of the number of new users that signed up across the whole country in a given week.
    Video: Jameson Toole

    For nearly 50 years, marketers have studied the “diffusion of innovations” (named by Everett Rogers in his 1962 book of the same title) to predict how the purchase of expensive, durable goods such as cars and refrigerators will spread. But the diffusion of high-tech websites and cheap smartphone apps is thought to occur in a very different way.

    “Nobody has ever really looked at the diffusion among innovators of a no-risk, free or low-cost product that’s only useful if other people join you. It’s a new paradigm in economics: what to do with all these new things that are free and easy to share,” says MIT graduate student Jameson Toole, a co-author of the paper.

    Meeyoung Cha of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology is the third co-author, and also the person who had the prescience to begin downloading Twitter-published user data (via Twitter API) in May 2006, when there were only a couple of hundred users. She downloaded data through August 2009, when user growth dropped off for a time.

    González and Toole said their model of Twitter contagion didn’t fit Cha’s data until they added media influence, based on the number of news stories appearing weekly in Google News searches, data they acquired using Google Insights for Search, which provides historical search-engine data.

    “Other studies have included news media in their models, but usually as a constant,” González says. “We saw that news media is not a constant. Instead, it’s media responding to people’s interest and vice versa, so we included it as random spikes.”

    The study data include the growth spike that began April 15, 2009, when actor Ashton Kutcher challenged CNN to see who could first attract 1 million Twitter followers. Kutcher ultimately won, reaching the million mark in the wee hours of April 17, about half an hour before CNN. Popular talk-show host Oprah Winfrey invited Kutcher to appear on her show that same day; when she ceremoniously sent her first tweet, the pace of new news stories picked up again, and so did new Twitter accounts.

    The Twitter bird was suddenly on all the wires, and Twitter’s user accounts increased fourfold because of the media attention, indicating that as recently as 2009, location-based social networks and media attention still held sway over computer-based social networks.

    “This analysis brings together different dimensions of diffusion and product adoption: geography, media coverage and social networks,” says social network scholar David Lazar, an associate professor in Northeastern University’s Department of Political Science and the College of Computer and Information Science. “There are few examples of research that have all three of those pieces. Pulling it all into one analysis using novel sources of data — Twitter adoption by metropolitan area and Google search terms — is really a nice innovation.”
    http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2011/twitt...-research-1221
    Última edição por 5ms; 10-04-2014 às 18:06.

  5. #5
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    The study data include the growth spike that began April 15, 2009, when actor Ashton Kutcher challenged CNN to see who could first attract 1 million Twitter followers. Kutcher ultimately won, reaching the million mark in the wee hours of April 17, about half an hour before CNN. Popular talk-show host Oprah Winfrey invited Kutcher to appear on her show that same day; when she ceremoniously sent her first tweet, the pace of new news stories picked up again, and so did new Twitter accounts.
    A mesmissima jogada foi feita no Brasil, se não me engano com Luciano Huck e atores da Globo.

  6. #6
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    New Data Quantifies Dearth of Tweeters on Twitter

    A report from Twopcharts, a website that monitors Twitter account activity, states that about 44% of the 974 million existing Twitter accounts have never sent a tweet.

    Twopcharts said that 30% of existing Twitter accounts have sent 1-10 tweets. Only 13% of the accounts have written at least 100 tweets.

    Moreover, the report highlights Twitter’s user retention issue. It estimates 542.1 million accounts have sent at least one tweet since they’ve been created, suggesting that more than half of the accounts in existence have actively tried out the service. But just 23% of those accounts have tweeted sometime in the last 30 days.



    Twitter is having no trouble signing up users. But some new research provides an update on the size of an ongoing problem: getting people to tweet.

    A report from Twopcharts, a website that monitors Twitter account activity, states that about 44% of the 974 million existing Twitter accounts have never sent a tweet.

    Twopcharts, which provided some data about tweeting activity last month, is unable to track when someone has logged into their account. It can only tell when the account retweets or tweets its own message.

    Twitter said it has 241 million monthly active users the last three months of 2013. Twitter defines a monthly active user as an account that logs in at least once a month. By Twitter’s standards, a person does not have to tweet to be considered a monthly active user.

    To be sure, people don’t have to actively tweet to find the service useful. There’s more than enough stuff to read on almost any topic in the world on Twitter to keep users occupied.

    But having engaged users–those who are active participants in the online conversation–are particularly valuable to Twitter. For one thing, activity tends to make users more inclined to continue using the service.

    Secondly, user tweets, retweets, favorites and other actions help Twitter generate advertising revenue. Over the last year, the company has made it easier for users to do those things and introduced user-friendly features such as pictures into the timeline.

    A Twitter spokesman declined to comment, saying the company does not comment on third-party data.

    Yet it appears Twitter accounts in general don’t say much. This could be because they are quietly reading the tweets or haven’t come back to the service. Twopcharts said that 30% of existing Twitter accounts have sent 1-10 tweets. Only 13% of the accounts have written at least 100 tweets.

    Moreover, the report highlights Twitter’s user retention issue. It estimates 542.1 million accounts have sent at least one tweet since they’ve been created, suggesting that more than half of the accounts in existence have actively tried out the service. But just 23% of those accounts have tweeted sometime in the last 30 days.
    http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2014/04/...rs-on-twitter/

  7. #7
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    Google/YouTube: We're TV's Best Friends

    Monday, April 14, 2014, 11:28 AM ET

    Posted by Will Richmond



    Late last week Google released research demonstrating the growing impact that YouTube and Google are having on TV show viewership and engagement. Per the chart below, Google found that for a sample of 100 broadcast and cable networks, TV-related activities on Google and YouTube for May-December 2013 were up sharply across 5 different metrics vs. the same period of 2013.

    The biggest gainer was TV-related watch time on YouTube, which was up 65%, followed by TV-related engagement activities on YouTube (up 56%) and TV-related searches on YouTube (up 54%). The big driver of searches was mobile devices, which experienced a 100%+ growth rate year-over-year.



    Google also found strong correlations between Google/YouTube searches with live plus 3-day viewership. The research found that for new shows search activity remains roughly constant starting around 20 weeks before premiere week and then spikes during premiere week and stays relatively high 4-6 weeks after. Trailers are the most-watched type of content for new shows.

    Conversely, returning shows have constant search activity even during off-seasons. No surprise, serialized dramas, particularly those targeted to teens have the highest search activity.

    Beyond search, discussing and creating new TV show-related content is popular on YouTube, with over 7 pieces of user-generated content uploaded for each piece uploaded by the TV network. Game of Thrones led with 89 user-generated videos per network upload, followed by The Vampire Diaries with 69. TV networks' YouTube channels are becoming a key part of the promotional mix, increasing their subscribers by 69% from January to December 2013.

    Google/YouTube's growing role in TV dovetails perfectly with Chromecast, which lets users easily move video from mobile devices to the TV. The company has a huge role to play in the full lifecycle for TV programs: discovery, viewing, engagement and monetization. This is why the living room is so important to Google and why it will continue pushing multiple initiatives, like Android TV, to try gaining the strongest foothold possible.

    The full research report is available here.
    http://iq.videonuze.com/article/goog...s-best-friends

  8. #8
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    Citação Postado originalmente por 5ms Ver Post
    A report from Twopcharts, a website that monitors Twitter account activity, states that about 44% of the 974 million existing Twitter accounts have never sent a tweet.

    Twopcharts said that 30% of existing Twitter accounts have sent 1-10 tweets. Only 13% of the accounts have written at least 100 tweets.
    Retweeted by WSJD Scott Austin ‏@ScottMAustin 1m


    Twitter's new product chief is @danielgraf, who has tweeted exactly three times (including one to announce his news today.)

  9. #9
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    Why Nobody Writes About Popular TV Shows

    ...

    As I wrote a few months ago, the most essayed-about show (Girls), most tweeted-about show (Pretty Little Liars), and most buzzed-about show (at the time: House of Cards) sum to half the average audience of NCIS (which is hardly essayed, tweeted, or buzzed about at all).

    More than other entertainment industries, TV seems to play by the rules of a peculiar Faustian bargain: Be popular and scarcely acknowledged; or be praised and scarcely watched.

    This bring us to The Big Bang Theory, which deserves a theory of its own. The Big Bang Theory is not merely the most popular comedy on television, besting its nearest rival by a margin of 10 million viewers. It's the most popular comedy for every demographic between the ages of 12 and 54 and, more importantly, the most popular show on television in 2014. An estimated 84 million people—equal to the combined populations of California, Texas, and New York—have watched at least six minutes of it this year, according to a marvelous new investigation of the show's popularity in New York magazine.

    ...

    Which leads to the deeper, economic explanation. Broadcast TV sells audiences. Premium TV sells a "brand." That's how HBO's Richard Plepler, speaking yesterday at The Atlantic's New York Ideas conference, summed up the difference between what he does and what broadcast television—e.g.: NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX—tries to do. HBO makes all of its money from selling subscriptions (to the HBO channel) and selling shows (e.g. to Amazon and anybody else). Broadcast television, however, has an entirely different business model based overwhelmingly on advertising. Among the broadcasters, ad money follows audience.

    The macroeconomics of TV aren't invisible to consumers. They are incredibly visible. You see them every night. HBO can afford to produce risky niche entertainment because its success is determined, not by maximizing the ratings for each show, but by making just enough original programming that keeps its subscribers from canceling. If a significant share of HBO's audience only watches one show a season (say: Veep), that would be a triumph. If a significant share of CBS's audience only watched 30 minutes of CBS a week, it would be an unmitigated disaster. HBO is hunting sign-ups, so it can afford to downplay ratings. CBS is hunting eyeballs, so it can't. And so CBS and HBO can both be thrillingly successful on their own terms, even though one channel makes formulaic popular stuff that nobody writes about and the other channel makes much less popular stuff that absorbs the attention of TV media precisely because it isn't formulaic.

    In short: TV critics are drawn to writing about creative departures from the very popular formulas that are often required the keep an ad-supported audience tuned into broadcast TV. And so, two different business models in the TV bundle—ad-supported on broadcast vs. subscriber-supported on cable and premium—yield two different worlds: One where lots of people watch TV and one where a handful of people watch and read about it.

    ...
    http://www.theatlantic.com/business/...-shows/361872/

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