Resultados 1 a 6 de 6
  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,049

    [EN] Facebook secretly working on a new website called “Facebook at Work”

    Plan for professional network to challenge LinkedIn.
    Your office may try to keep you off Facebook right now, but you may have a genuinely work-related reason to hop on that social network in the near future. Sources for the Financial Times understand that the Internet giant is developing "Facebook at Work," a professional take on its familiar formula. It'll reportedly look very like Facebook – with a newsfeed and groups - but will focus on chatting with coworkers, connecting with business partners and collaborating on documents.

    The company isn't commenting on the apparent leak, but you might not have to wait long to try it out. Facebook employees have reportedly been using the work-focused site for a while, and a handful of outside companies are now giving it a try. There's no telling whether or not the service will displace the likes of LinkedIn, assuming the leak is accurate to begin with. Nonetheless, it's easy to see the appeal of a work-safe Facebook that omits all the iffy photos and status updates that you'd rather not share with your colleagues.
    http://www.engadget.com/2014/11/16/f...-at-work-leak/
    Última edição por 5ms; 16-11-2014 às 20:54.

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,049

    FT: Facebook seeks foothold in your office

    Facebook's new product could take market share from LinkedIn, the social network for professionals with 90m active monthly users. LinkedIn has become the dominant site for online business networking, but Facebook at Work could also challenge Google's drive, email and chat products and Microsoft's Outlook email service, Office software and Yammer, the corporate social network it bought for $1.2bn in 2012.

    The Silicon Valley company is developing a new product designed to allow users to chat with colleagues, connect with professional contacts and collaborate over documents, competing with Google Drive and Microsoft Office, according to people familiar with the matter.

    The new site will look very like Facebook - with a newsfeed and groups - but will allow users to keep their personal profile with its holiday photos, political rants and silly videos separate from their work identity. Facebook declined to comment.

    Facebook employees have long used the site in their daily work and expanding this to other companies has been discussed internally for some time. The project began in earnest during the past year and is now being tested with companies as its launch approaches. Some of the engineers developing Facebook at Work are based in London.

    Facebook's new product could take market share from LinkedIn, the social network for professionals with 90m active monthly users. LinkedIn has become the dominant site for online business networking, but Facebook at Work could also challenge Google's drive, email and chat products and Microsoft's Outlook email service, Office software and Yammer, the corporate social network it bought for $1.2bn in 2012.

    To become an integral part of office life, Facebook will need to win the trust of companies and organisations, which will expect to be able to conduct confidential conversations and share important information on the site, without it falling into the hands of rivals. Many companies, concerned about falling productivity as employees spend work time checking personal messages and internet gossip, currently ban Facebook from the workplace.

    Facebook has grown from a small website for students wanting to connect to each other 10 years ago, to a network with 1.35bn people logging on each month, almost two-thirds of whom visit every day. The company's mission statement is now to connect everyone, understand the world and build the knowledge economy.

    The company, which has often been criticised by privacy advocatesfor how it handles user data, has been trying to rebuild its reputation on privacy this year, changing the default to a more private setting. Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder, said at the annual general meeting this year that these changes marked an "important cultural shift" for the company.

    Facebook already has a reputation for solid security, enhanced by its rollout of encryption by default last year, after the Snowden leaks shined a light on how easily the US National Security Agency had been able to access the data of large numbers of users.

    The company is unlikely to charge for the service, at least initially, which will boost the amount of time spent on the platform, as employees previously banned from using the site in the office may now be encouraged to use it. Facebook generates the vast majority of its revenue from advertising, and the longer people spend on the site, the more opportunities it will have to show adverts.

    Mr Zuckerberg said in July that Facebook still had "a lot of room to grow". US users spend about 40 minutes a day on the service but, he noted, they spend nine hours each day with digital media on TVs, phones and computers. "There's a big opportunity to improve the way people connect and share," he said.
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/db8722bc-6...44feabdc0.html
    Última edição por 5ms; 16-11-2014 às 21:06.

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,049

    Facebook prepara rede social voltada para empresas

    DO "FINANCIAL TIMES"
    16/11/2014 17h46

    Chamada de "Facebook at Work", será uma rede social interna que permitirá aos usuários conversar com colegas e também compartilhar documentos como textos e planilhas, que poderão ser editados simultaneamente por mais de um profissional.

    O visual será semelhante ao da rede social, com feeds de notícias e grupos, e o usuário poderá manter uma página pessoal, com conteúdo privado, separado do ambiente corporativo.

    O Facebook não quis comentar o assunto.

    Os funcionários da rede social têm usado uma solução semelhante há muito tempo e o projeto de expandi-lo como um produto começou a ser desenvolvido no ano passado.

    O site está sendo testado em algumas empresas. Parte dos desenvolvedores da nova solução estão baseados em Londres.

    Com a entrada no mercado corporativo, o Facebook vai concorrer com redes como o Linkedin, atual líder para conexões do tipo, com 90 milhões de usuários ativos por mês.

    Também fará competição a produtos de e-mail e chat do Google e da Microsoft e ao MS Yammer, rede social corporativa comprada pela companhia em 2012.

    Para avançar sobre este mercado, porém, o Facebook precisará convencer as empresas de que poderão publicar informações confidenciais na rede interna com segurança.

    Além disso, muitas companhias proíbem hoje o acesso à rede social durante o trabalho, por temer perda de produtividade dos funcionários com conversas pessoais.

    O Facebook não deverá cobrar pelo novo serviço, ao menos no início. O benefício para a companhia será o aumento de tráfego em suas páginas. A rede social obtém a maior parte de suas receitas, hoje, de anúncios –quanto mais gente ficar em suas páginas por mais tempo, maior é essa receita.
    http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/mercado...empresas.shtml

  4. #4
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,049
    Como se não bastasse a contabilidade criativa, temos agora a tradução com interpretação criativa.

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,049
    Benedict Evans ‏@BenedictEvans There's a difference between a business social network and a social network in your business.

  6. #6
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,049

    Facebook Has an Innovation Problem, Even @Work

    Nov 17, 2014 5:39 PM EST
    By Katie Benner


    Mark Zuckerberg has a knack for identifying threats to Facebook and warding them off with a strategic acquisition. He snapped up the photo-sharing service Instagram and the developing world’s most popular messaging app, WhatsApp, for huge sums to keep those popular, mobile-first products from hurting the mammoth social network he founded.

    But he’s been less adept at developing his own killer products that take advantage of hot new trends. When he couldn’t buy Snapchat for billions of dollars, his internal teams came up with a rival disappearing-message app called Slingshot. The service is similar, save for the fact that you can’t open a message until you send one back. The premise was overly complicated and the app basically fizzled when people decided that they didn’t always want to have to send an inane message just to get a bit of ephemera. Facebook’s efforts to work with mobile developers also floundered until the company acquired a startup called Parse. Paper, the company’s Flipboard-like product, has gotten some traction but still isn't an important Facebook asset.

    That’s why I’m curious to see what happens with Facebook@Work, the company’s attempt to make a tool for messaging and collaboration. The Financial Times broke the news Sunday that it’s still testing the product, but it’s clearly a response to hot startups like Slack, as well as widely used corporate collaboration and messaging tools like Microsoft’s Yammer, HipChat and Cisco Jabber. It could also compete with Google Docs, while the ability to curate groups of business contacts, separate from “friends,” could make it a LinkedIn competitor too.

    There’s no way to say whether a not-yet-launched product will succeed, but there’s no mystery as to why Facebook is targeting the enterprise. Facebook, for all of its reach, hasn’t found a way to reliably monetize Internet traffic beyond its own core products.

    Google, on the other hand, is (for now) the indispensible tool that people use to search the Web. Its share of the online ad market reflects its pole position. The Google office suite gives it entree to enterprise users, who tend to be very sticky because they build corporate processes on top of that software and they don't like to regularly switch vendors. That’s one of the reasons why Slack just raised more money at a billion-dollar-plus valuation and why Microsoft felt that it had to own the corporate collaboration tool Yammer.

    Guess which social network is harvesting the most value per user? LinkedIn. Its average revenue per user is $3.33, while Facebook’s is just $1.13, according to the Wall Street Journal. LinkedIn may not have the broad appeal of a Google, but its niche network provides is home to a lot of white-collar users who in and of themselves are valuable -- so much so that people will even pay to be a part of it. That valuable, difficult-to-reproduce community is one of the reasons that LinkedIn has made headway in China, a place where a social network like Facebook is easy to copy, but LinkedIn’s web of professional connections can’t be replicated.

    Facebook@Work seems like a much harder product to get right than, say, a Snapchat copycat or the Paper app. “To fully compete in the enterprise requires deep and complex capabilities that aren't required in a consumer offering," Forrester analyst Rob Koplowitz said in an e-mail blast to reporters about the Facebook@Work announcement. "It can also be a tough, low margin business where cost of sales can be high.”

    Whatever the fate of Facebook@Work, it shows how anxious Facebook is to monetize or control parts of the Internet where it currently lags, and how difficult that challenge is likely to be.
    http://www.bloombergview.com/article...blem-even-work

Permissões de Postagem

  • Você não pode iniciar novos tópicos
  • Você não pode enviar respostas
  • Você não pode enviar anexos
  • Você não pode editar suas mensagens
  •