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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Dec 2010
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    BF-US: Desktop PC traffic represented 74% of all online sales

    Further, consumers spent more money on their desktops with an average order value of $144.28 compared to their mobile devices at $120.77 a difference of 19.5 percent.

    Em $$$$:

    74% -> $144,28 -> 77%

    26% -> $120,77 -> 23%




    Armonk, NY - 29 Nov 2014: IBM today reported record online and mobile shopping during Thanksgiving and Black Friday based on consumer transaction data analyzed in real-time by the IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark. The data-driven insight gives retailers and marketers more than 370 performance indicators to benchmark themselves against industry peers to drive more targeted customer engagements.

    For the first time, online traffic from mobile devices outpaced traditional PCs on Thanksgiving Day. As IBM predicted within one percent of accuracy, Thanksgiving Day reached a new mobile tipping point with browsing on smartphones and tablets accounting for 52.1 percent of all online traffic. Overall Thanksgiving online sales were up 14.3 percent compared to 2013. The mobile momentum carried into Black Friday, which saw a surge in both online and mobile shopping as consumers brought their devices into the store to comparison shop. Overall Black Friday online sales were up 9.5 percent year-over-year with mobile devices accounting for one-in-four of all online purchases. New York City also retained its title as the top U.S. city for Black Friday online shopping.

    “Mobile has become the new Thanksgiving tradition as consumers find the best deals with their fingers as well as their feet," said Jay Henderson, Director, IBM Smarter Commerce. “We saw retailers harness the power of data to engage shoppers, identifying the unique preferences of their customers while quickly capitalizing on online, mobile or in-store trends as they emerged.”

    The IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark is delivered to clients through the company’s Smarter Commerce initiative, which combines innovation from $3.5 billion invested to develop the industry’s leading customer engagement platform with expertise working with 8,000 leading global brands and 35,000 commerce engagements.

    The company released the following trends as of 12:00 a.m. PST this morning, at the official close of the two-day shopping period:

    • Historic Mobile Milestone Spurs Online Shopping: Thanksgiving Day mobile traffic accounted for 52.1 percent of all online traffic – the first time mobile devices have outpaced their PC counterparts for online browsing. Black Friday mobile traffic reached 49.6 percent of all online traffic, an increase of 25 percent over last year. Black Friday mobile sales accounted for 27.9 percent of total online sales, up 28.2 percent over 2013.


    • Smartphones Browse, Tablets Buy: As the new digital shopping companion for many consumers, smartphones drove 34.7 percent of all Black Friday online traffic, more than double that of tablets, which accounted for 14.6 percent of all traffic. Yet, when it comes to mobile sales, tablets continue to win the shopping war – driving 16 percent of online sales compared to 11.8 percent for smartphones, a difference of 35.5 percent. Tablet users also averaged $126.50 per order compared to $107.55 for smartphone users, a difference of 17.6 percent.


    • Thanksgiving Eats Into Black Friday Sales: Thanksgiving Day online sales increased 14.3 percent over 2013, with Black Friday up 9.5 percent year-over-year. Average order value on Thanksgiving was $125.25, down 1.8 percent over 2013; Black Friday was $129.37, down 4.4 percent. This trend may indicate that shoppers are becoming more comfortable and digitally savvy in how they use online coupons and rebates to secure the best bargains. Black Friday online sales were 63.5 percent higher than Thanksgiving Day. This is a decrease from 2013, however, when it was 70 percent higher as Thanksgiving online sales continue to eat into Black Friday shopping.


    • Top Five U.S. Cities for Online Shopping: New York City claimed the top spot for Black Friday online shopping followed by Washington, D.C.; Atlanta, GA; Los Angeles, CA; and Chicago, IL. New York City shoppers spent on average $121.91 per order on Black Friday.


    • iOS vs. Android: iOS once again led the way in mobile shopping this holiday season, outpacing Android across three key metrics on Black Friday:

    o Average Order Value: iOS users averaged $121.86 per order compared to $98.07 for Android users, a difference 24.3 percent.
    o Online Traffic: iOS traffic accounted for 34.2 percent of total online traffic, more than double that of Android, which drove 15 percent of all online traffic.
    o Online Sales: iOS sales accounted for 21.9 percent of total online sales, nearly quadruple that of Android, which drove 5.8 percent of all online sales.

    • The Desktop is Not Dead: When consumers did choose to use their PC or desktop, they spent more with an average order value of $135.33 compared to $116.02 for mobile shoppers, a difference of 16.6 percent.


    • Social Influence – Facebook vs. Pinterest: As marketers continue to rely on social channels to drive brand loyalty and sales, IBM analyzed trends across two leading sites on Black Friday – Facebook and Pinterest. Facebook referrals drove an average of $109.94 per order compared to $100.24 for Pinterest, a difference of nearly 10 percent. Facebook referrals converted online sales at more than twice the rate of Pinterest.


    • Less Frequent, More Targeted Email Promos*: Retailers sent an average of 5.3 emails on Black Friday 2014, decreasing more than 11 percent over the same period in 2013, as retail marketers continue to send more targeted -- and less frequent -- messages to shoppers. Open and click-through rates – when someone opens an email and clicks at least one link – were 12.9 percent and 2.4 percent, on Black Friday and Thanksgiving Day, compared to 15.4 percent and 2.8 percent respectively, last year.


    The IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark also reported real-time trends across four of the hottest retail categories this holiday season:

    1. Department Stores: Black Friday online sales grew by 22.9 percent over 2013, with mobile percentage of sales increasing by 25.7 percent. Average order value was $143.16, a decrease of 2.5 percent year-over-year.

    2. Health and Beauty: Black Friday online sales grew by 56.9 percent over 2013, with mobile percentage of sales increasing by 31.8 percent. Average order value was $72.78, an increase of 9.8 percent year-over-year.

    3. Home Goods: Black Friday online sales grew by 43.2 percent over 2013, with mobile percentage of sales increasing by 3.8 percent. Average order value was $238.46, an increase of 6.8 percent year-over-year.

    4. Apparel: Black Friday online sales grew by 22.6 percent over 2013, with mobile percentage of sales increasing by 25.2 percent. Average order value was $114.96, a decrease of 6.8 percent year-over-year.

    To access full reports and real-time updates on holiday shopping trends, check out the IBM Digital Analytics Benchmark Hub and new self-service app at www.ibm.com/benchmark. For more information on how IBM’s real-time analytics delivered through the cloud can improve end-to-end customer engagement, visit www.ibm.com/smartercommerce.
    http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pr...ease/45515.wss

    Aos interessados em maiores detalhes, a IBM emite alertas no seguinte endereço:
    http://www-01.ibm.com/software/marke...hub/alert.html

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,019

    Apple's iOS Has Once Again Decimated Android When It Comes To Data That Matters

    Benedict Evans ‏@BenedictEvans The interesting question is whether Android use is so low because it gets the users who don't care/won't spend, or because of Android itself

    Benedict Evans ‏@BenedictEvans Right now, it's blindingly obvious in every metric that Apple has most of the high-value users (*)

    Benedict Evans ‏@BenedictEvans When Tim Cook talks about share of use over market share that's not a consolation prize. It's fundamental to ecosystem sustainability.

    Benedict Evans ‏@BenedictEvans PCs mostly had people who cared but mobile has everyone, including lots of people who don't care at all. Apple has most of those who do care

    Benedict Evans ‏@BenedictEvans
    In PCs, unit share and ecosystem share were the same thing, because ~all PC users were viable customers. In mobile that isn't true.




    (*)
    Apple's mobile operating system is once again dominating Google's operating system when it comes to online shopping.

    Adobe, which is tracking online shopping, reports the following: "iOS users drove four times as much mobile sales revenue as Android users, 79 and 21 percent respectively."

    IBM's data produced similar findings:

    • iOS vs. Android: iOS once again led the way in mobile shopping this holiday season, outpacing Android across three key metrics on Black Friday:


    • Average Order Value: iOS users averaged $121.86 per order compared to $98.07 for Android users, a difference 24.3 percent.
    • Online Traffic: iOS traffic accounted for 34.2 percent of total online traffic, more than double that of Android, which drove 15 percent of all online traffic.
    • Online Sales: iOS sales accounted for 21.9 percent of total online sales, nearly quadruple that of Android, which drove 5.8 percent of all online sales.


    This is important for a few reasons.

    For years, people have talked about Apple's tiny market share when it comes to the phone market. Globally, Apple has 12% of the smartphone market, according to Gartner. Android has 82%. In the US, Apple has 42% of the market, and Android has 52%, according to comScore.

    Market share is important because typically in tech, it's winner-take-all. The more people you have using your platform, the better you will do.

    In theory, the more people use Android, the more developers and publishers will tailor their websites and their apps to Android. In theory, Apple's iPhone will be a second class citizen with second class apps. Eventually people will bail on the iPhone if it's offering a second class experience.

    But, in practice, Android's market share advantage means nothing because iOS is more popular when it comes to usage, as demonstrated by these shopping data points. If you're making an app or a website, you want it to work best on iOS because that is where the most lucrative customers are. So, in practice, Apple gets the best apps and the best web experience because that's what makes sense for companies and developers.

    You could argue that this isn't indicative of usage, but merely demonstrates that iOS users have more money to burn. If that's the case, it's good for iOS, too. People with money to burn are an attractive cohort of users for developers and companies.
    http://www.businessinsider.com/ios-a...g-data-2014-11

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