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  1. #1
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    [EN] Leading IaaS Partners of European SaaS ISVs



    AWS 15%
    OVH 8%
    Hetzner 6%
    1und1 6%
    Rackspace 6%
    Azure 3%
    HostEurope 3%


    http://www.themetisfiles.com/2014/11...ean-saas-isvs/

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    2015 Will Be A Very Interesting Year for Hybrid InterClouds

    Local cloud and hosting providers increasingly seek alliances with global cloud suppliers. Global cloud suppliers increasingly seek local presence and open up private links to their infrastructure. Data centre providers are the new cloud hubs that bring global and local clouds together. There is plenty going on in Europe at the moment. Global cloud suppliers are investing heavily in building out their infrastructure across the globe and in Europe. We recently reported on the new Amazon cloud in Germany, complementing the existing AWS cloud in Ireland. But there is plenty more activity. IBM’s Softlayer already has cloud facilities in London, Amsterdam, Frankfurt and Paris and is planning to open up more PODs around the region including at least one more in The Netherlands. Microsoft Azure has existing cloud facilities in Amsterdam and Dublin and we expect a German cloud facility to be in the works. VMware is expanding its vCloud Air offering to Germany, complementing its existing UK location.

    Increasingly, large public clouds are not only accessible through the Internet but also through private links. Amazon can be reached through its Direct Connect, Microsoft through its ExpressRoute, Softlayer through its Direct Link and VMware through its vCloud Air Connect. Data centre providers Telecity Group (Cloud-IX), Equinix (ECX) and InterXion (CloudConnect) are actively positioning themselves as central hubs in the cloud connect game, linking up global with local clouds.

    At the same time, local European cloud and hosting providers that have been busy building out their local infrastructure (check out our cloudscape research to find out who they are) are looking to capitalize on the hybrid cloud opportunity. While for some this means that they will remain distinctly local and provide their own private, hybrid and public cloud offerings, others have started to forge alliances with global cloud providers to complement their own offering. Some examples of alliances between local and global cloud suppliers in the Benelux region in 2014 include:


    The above three announcements are only a precursor to a slew of alliance announcements that we expect in 2015. We believe that more local cloud and hosting providers but also other service providers will develop hybrid cloud alliances with global clouds such as Azure, Amazon, Softlayer, VMware vCloud Air, Google, HP Helion and others. Through positioning themselves as cloud integrators and orchestrators they can continue to play an important role for their customers. But hybrid clouds are only an interim stage in the big private to public cloud switch. Longer term, say within three years from now, we expect to see smaller service providers starting to phase out their own private infrastructure. By that time they can no longer compete with the innovation drive and global scale that the larger players offer. Instead they will focus on InterCloud management.
    http://www.themetisfiles.com/2014/12...d-interclouds/

  3. #3
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    Five Out Of Six German SaaS Vendors Hosted In Germany


  4. #4
    Web Hosting Master
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    qual é a magia da AWS para conseguir tantos clientes? Na última queda que tive foram mais de 24 horas totalmente offline, zero suporte e depois de tudo não recebi nenhum email falando sobre isso. Isso sem contar que as instâncias e seus discos foram todos corrompidos juntamente com os snapshots "redundantes".

    Será que o mito "cloud" não deixa o pessoal da TI das empresas mais "preguiçosos" em relação a backups, failover, etc etc... e acabam optando por soluções "automágicas" e "autohealing"?

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Eu não conheço os detalhes da pesquisa acima, mas os números sempre podem ser torturados Ressaltando-se que os resultados envolvem exclusivamente empresas que vendem SaaS, qual o significado desses percentuais? BS. No máximo, é uma medida de popularidade, mas não estamos falando de democracia para computar votos dos eleitores com o mesmo peso.

    Sobre o "mito" cloud e os profissionais de TI, vejo de forma diferente. No passado, o "poder" estava 100% concentrado nos centros de computação. Com os microcomputadores, os usuários ganharam poder. Com as redes locais e servidores, profissionais de TI recuperaram parte do antigo poder. Tenho dúvidas se estão dispostos a correrem o risco de se tornarem irrelevantes novamente. O que se observa é justamente o contrário. Veja o sucesso dos blades da Cisco (50 mil clientes), armazenagem da EMC, virtualização VMWare, etc. E como disseram: "OpenStack is for IT folks that want to stay on-prem, but fool their execs that they are doing ‘Cloud’.”. Claro que intercloud hibrida e outros bichos serão utilizados, mas não por preguiça de fazer backup.
    Última edição por 5ms; 15-12-2014 às 10:54.

  6. #6
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    Red face "ligeiramente" off-topic





    ...

    It is pertinent to note that despite the severe decline in global shipments of RISC/Unix servers, Oracle has managed positive year-over-year growth in each quarter of the current year. However, if Cisco continues to grow its servers business at the current breakneck speed, it will only hasten the decline of Oracle’s server business as the former eats into the market share of the latter.

    That Sounds Worrying. But is it?

    No, because the company is strategically moving away from “commodity hardware” or servers, to high-value “engineered systems”. Engineered systems are integrated platforms that are delivered ready for deployment and include pre-integrated packaged software and support for cloud-services. Oracle commands 55% of this is nearly $8 billion market that has been growing at rates as high as 68% in third quarter of 2013. Perhaps more importantly, the next biggest player in integrated platforms, IBM, commands just 11.1% of the market, indicating a huge gap between the two. HP is ranked third with a mere 1.7%, while Cisco does not even make the top five. This gives Oracle a firm foothold in a flourishing market which is set to get bigger as more and more customers migrate to such pre-integrated, one-stop systems.

    Oracle’s engineered systems segment includes Exadata, Exalytics and SPARC SuperCluster, which together make up for over a third of the company’s entire hardware product revenues. The company achieved double digit growth rates in revenues from engineered systems in the year so far; with hardware support margins approaching 70% because of the product-mix changing in favor of higher-value engineered systems. This performance backs Oracle’s bet on integrated platforms and has the potential to offset its poor performance in the servers market.

    We believe that the integrated platforms market could well be set for a long-term positive run, since this is a win-win product that benefits both the vendor and the customer. Unlike the low-margin stand-alone servers, integrated platforms are high-priced, high-margin products which also benefit the customers in the form of cost efficiencies and time savings. Further, as stated earlier, integrated platforms are a high-growth market in stark contrast to the servers market which has stagnated in recent times.

    Therefore, we believe that Oracle’s leadership position in this burgeoning market will comfortably offset Oracle’s decline in the server market.
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspe...et-to-cisco/2/
    Última edição por 5ms; 15-12-2014 às 14:31.

  7. #7
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    Hoje tropecei nesse estudo

    State of the Market: Enterprise Cloud 2014
    http://cloud.verizon.com/enterprise-cloud-report

    Highlights from
    This Year’s Report



    • Many customers are using cloud for external-facing production applications.
    • Enterprises know that cloud is not purely about saving money.
    • Cloud is putting IT back in the driver’s seat, fundamentally redefining its relevance to business.
    • Collaboration between IT and the lines of business will be critical if cloud is to deliver the transformative results that leaders increasingly expect.


    CQD

  8. #8
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    @inter

    VMware Vaults Into The Top-3 OpenStack Vendors

    OpenStack can make for strange bedfellows.

    If any one vendor served as the proprietary bogeyman to motivate the creation of an open source private cloud stack, it’s VMware. For more than a decade, the virtualization giant owned the core infrastructure of Global 2000 data centers ...

    ...


    But it’s important to remember that cloud infrastructure has two very different use cases. One is the systems administrator use case. Systems administrators want to manage process, policy and security while provisioning infrastructure to their internal customers. Historically, both VMware and Red Hat designed their solutions with the systems administrator use case as their focus–VMware with vCenter and Red Hat with RHEL Virtualization.

    The other is the developer use case. Developers don’t want to deal with the systems administrators or processes; they want direct, self-service access to their infrastructure. Both VMware and Red Hat are effectively using their existing “system administrator” offerings to wedge themselves into organizations to go after developers. The key difference is that VMware is a standard for at least 60% of systems administrators, whereas the RHEL Virtualization footprint in the enterprise is virtually non-existent.

    ...

    RW: It makes sense that an enterprise would look to a company like Mirantis for OpenStack software and support, given that you're a core contributor and have been selling your own OpenStack distribution into the Global 2000 market now for more than a year with some noted successes. From your perspective, why would an enterprise customer look to VMware for OpenStack? Wouldn't they more likely turn to a “known” OpenStack vendor like Mirantis or Red Hat?

    BR: Actually, I think VMware will overtake Red Hat in OpenStack sales in 2015. In fact, I doubt Red Hat will manage to stay in the top three in OpenStack revenues and workloads managed next year. Mirantis is seeing great customer traction, and we aim to keep the lead (grins). I predict we will be followed by HP and VMware. Yes, VMware. How has VMware vaulted into the top ranks so quickly? The main reason OpenStack is so popular is because it enables one to leverage existing infrastructure investments. For example, if you already have storage from NetApp, a load balancer from A10 and vCenter licenses, you can layer OpenStack right on top and have yourself a cloud.

    ...

    Enterprises invested a lot more in VMware infrastructure than they did in RHEL. They will have no reason to switch to “RHEL Integrated OpenStack” when it functions as a rip-and-replace of VMware with no less lock-in.
    http://readwrite.com/2014/12/18/vmwa...s-boris-renski



    Focus on Reducing Unit Costs of IT

    ...
    • Behavioral- although not popular to implement, end-user behavior change can produce significant cost savings. As more applications and systems move to some type of cloud, end users are becoming accustomed to buying services from a standard offering, having their workload metered, and eventually paying for what is used. These same procedural changes can be made for the internal IT without going to a cloud, and these can help reduce waste and improve overall asset utilization.
    • Ownership – again, referring to the cloud, the ideas of IT-on-demand and for a per-use fee is gaining wider acceptance. The challenge to ownership does not require that you move IT to an off-promise location to get these benefits, since on-premise pay-as-you-go services are readily available for storage, backup, servers, VM, DR, and application hosting. For IT infrastructure, many are seeing the elasticity cost benefits of these new models. You want and need to own your data, but not necessarily all of the attending infrastructure.

    ...
    http://blogs.hds.com/david/2014/11/f...sts-of-it.html


    Meg Whitman: "Public cloud gives you convenience, private cloud gives you confidence"



    Cloud, But Private Cloud Enterprises predict a big drop in on-premises/non-cloud use



    https://t.co/VmfvWXJCfV
    Última edição por 5ms; 19-12-2014 às 12:03.

  9. #9
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    After ignoring IT for simple cloud moves, business is going to need help

    By Sharon Gaudin

    Computerworld | Dec 19, 2014 11:58 AM PT

    For years, people in marketing or HR have been sneaking their apps and data onto the cloud, totally bypassing IT's approval or help.

    Buckle up, IT.

    Those days are coming to an end as more enterprises look into moving critical applications and information to the cloud. IT shops are being called in to corral all of those individual cloud projects, while moving critical data to the cloud, as well.

    "Central IT departments are absolutely going to be more involved with how enterprises use, or don't use, cloud services," said Dan Olds, an analyst with The Gabriel Consulting Group. "In the past, individual departments or employees have used cloud services like a fat guy would use a buffet. They'd use whatever service they wanted, when they wanted, and never run their plans by central IT."

    Market research firm IDC predicted that the worldwide cloud market, which encompasses private, public and hybrid clouds, will jump from $95.8 billion this year to $118 billion in 2015 and $200 billion by 2018.


    The private and hybrid clouds, which will call for IT involvement, should see the strongest growth, according to Technology Business Research. The private cloud is expected to grow 35% year-over-year in 2015 with the hybrid cloud predicted to grow 50%.

    It's not such a big deal when departments or individuals want to store simple data on services like Google's Cloud or Apple iCloud for individual projects or even application testing and development.

    However, now that bigger, and more important, data stores are going to the cloud, IT needs to be part of the decision-making process, figuring out what cloud service to use and whether the company should use a public, private or hybrid cloud.

    "When you're talking about applications and services that are important to the enterprise, it's crucial to have IT in the loop so that they can assess security, performance and availability risk factors," Olds said. "Sort of like having your doctor by your elbow at the buffet. It's not as satisfying, but you'll be healthier in the long run."

    Allan Krans, an analyst with Technology Business Research, noted that the days of companies having multiple silos of information and applications running without IT's involvement or knowledge should be coming to an end in the coming year.

    It may not be an easy change in the enterprise.

    "Individual departments didn't need to manage or integrate or worry about the performance of those workloads," he added. "I think it has created a lot of tension in the enterprise. There was a lot of passive aggressive bypassing of IT. One customer we spoke with said IT had too many barriers to the cloud. First there was security, then it was about politics or simply resisting change."

    Since employees have been purposefully bypassing IT with their cloud efforts, there's some resentment and ill feelings there, which will just add to the challenges of working together to build an overall cloud system.

    "The teams are not accustomed to working together and implementing change," Krans said. "It's not just a technology problem. It's an organization problem. It's a culture problem. The cloud is exacerbating a problem that's been there all along."

    Jeff Kagan, an independent industry analyst, said IT managers shouldn't wait to be invited to the cloud discussion. They should reach out to business executives and explain the benefits, risks and challenges of adopting the cloud and reigning in those rogue cloud users.

    "This is both a blessing and a curse for the IT department," said Kagan. "This is very positive for the enterprise if they do this correctly, and if they don't have any security problems along the way. This is the way business will be run going forward. We are in the bumpy transition period, which will take several years."

    Part of that transition means IT managers need to bone up on all things cloud before they enter into discussions with business executives. IT executives need to be able to assess the different cloud implementations they'll be asked about and understand the implications of a cloud or no-cloud decision.

    IT will also need to develop policies to govern cloud use and mechanisms to make it easy for departments to comply, noted Olds.

    "This is a good development because it gives IT visibility into what's actually going on in the rest of the organization," he added. "The fact that departments already are using outside cloud providers will complicate it, for sure. Many computing revolutions started out with disgruntled users rolling their own solutions without the approval or knowledge of central IT. This is just the circle of life in the business-IT ecosystem."
    http://www.computerworld.com/article...-adoption.html

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