Infrastructure-as-a-Service provider DigitalOcean is expanding its infrastructure through Telx data centers. The company has deployed servers in Telx’s SCL2 data center in Santa Clara, California.
That location will complement a Telx San Francisco deployment, with DigitalOcean housing non-network infrastructure needs in SCL2. The new location is strategic based on proximity to DigitalOcean’s peering and network hubs within the San Francisco Bay Area. Telx houses DigitalOcean in New York and New Jersey facilities as well.

New York-based DigitalOcean targets the developer cloud, emphasizing simplicity and speed of deploying virtual servers, which it calls “droplets.” The message has resonated, the company growing exponentially.

Netcraft called DigitaOcean the third largest cloud based on web-facing growth it observed last year. DigitalOcean raised $37.2 million in an Andreessen Horowitz-led Series A funding round in March 2014.

DigitalOcean’s other area location, Telx’s San Francisco data center, SFR1, is an important network exchange location for the Bay Area. SCL2 will tether the peering and network hubs located in San Francisco.

“DigitalOcean has a proximity and latency advantage with Telx’s NYC2 and SFR1 data centers as well as scale advantages in the NJR3 and SCL2 facilities,” Mitch Wainer, chief marketing officer and founder of DigitalOcean said in a statement. “None of this is possible without national solutions and facilities focused on capability sets, and this is why we decided to expand our relationship with Telx.”

The expansion also benefits Telx’s Cloud Xchange portfolio, the company’s cloud ecosystem play. Telx has worked to boost both private cloud connectivity and hybrid cloud connectivity in a bid to attract enterprise customers.

Internationally, DigitalOcean opened a UK data center with Equinix in July last year and also opened in Singapore.

Developer-focused IaaS provider and DigitalOcean competitor Linode recently announced international expansion. The success of both DigitalOcean and Linode has proven that giants like Amazon Web Services haven’t completely cornered the IaaS market.