Resultados 1 a 6 de 6
  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,020

    Enterprise public cloud - Azure avança, IBM Softlayer não decola




    ...

    The full results of the survey are available in the RightScale 2015 State of the Cloud Report at www.rightscale.com/2015-cloud-report.

    Highlights of the RightScale 2015 State of the Cloud Report include:

    Cloud is ubiquitous, hybrid cloud is the preferred strategy: 93 percent of organizations surveyed are running applications or experimenting with infrastructure-as-a-service; 82 percent of enterprises have a hybrid cloud strategy (up from 74 percent in 2014).
    Public clouds are used by more organizations while private cloud runs more workloads: 88 percent of organizations use public cloud compared with 63 percent that use private cloud; 13 percent of enterprises run more than 1,000 VMs in public cloud, while 22 percent of organizations run more than 1,000 VMs in private cloud.
    Significant headroom for more enterprise workloads to move to the cloud: 68 percent of enterprises run less than a fifth of their application portfolio in the cloud; 55 percent of enterprises report that a significant portion of their existing application portfolio is not in cloud, but is built with cloud-friendly architectures.
    Enterprise central IT teams take the reins to broker cloud services: 62 percent of enterprises report that central IT makes the majority of cloud spending decisions; 43 percent of IT teams are offering a self-service portal for access to cloud services, with an additional 41 percent planning or developing a portal.
    DevOps rises; Docker soars: Overall DevOps adoption has risen to 66 percent, with enterprises reaching 71 percent; Chef and Puppet are used by 28 and 24 percent of organizations respectively; Docker, in its first year, is already used by 13 percent of organizations with a whopping 35 percent of organizations planning to use.
    Amazon Web Services (AWS) continues to dominate in public cloud, but Azure makes inroads among enterprises: AWS adoption is 57 percent, while Azure IaaS is second at 12 percent vs.6 percent in 2014; Among enterprise respondents, Azure IaaS narrows the gap with 19 percent adoption as compared to AWS with 50 percent; Google's IaaS offering shows the faster growth among enterprises, increasing from 4 percent in 2014 to 9 percent in 2015.
    Private cloud stalls in 2015 with only small changes in adoption: Respondents reported minimal changes in adoption of private cloud technologies from 2014. VMware vSphere continues to lead with 53 percent of enterprise respondents reporting that they use it as a private cloud. Enterprises using OpenStack shows the largest increase for 2015, growing by 3 percent. The new Azure Pack offering shows strong use in its first year, used by 11 percent of enterprises.

    Survey Methodology
    RightScale conducted its annual State of the Cloud Survey in January 2015. The survey questioned technical professionals across a broad cross-section of organizations about their adoption of cloud computing. The 930 respondents range from technical executives to managers and practitioners and represent organizations of varying sizes across many industries. Respondents represent companies across the cloud spectrum, including both users (24 percent) and non-users (76 percent) of RightScale solutions. Their answers provide a comprehensive perspective on the state of the cloud today. The margin of error is 3.2 percent.

    About RightScale
    RightScale® Inc. Cloud Portfolio Management enables leading enterprises to accelerate delivery of cloud-based applications that engage customers and drive top-line revenue while optimizing cloud usage to reduce risk and costs. With RightScale, IT organizations can deliver instant access to a portfolio of public, private, and hybrid cloud services across business units and development teams while maintaining enterprise control. RightScale Consulting Services help companies develop cloud strategies, deliver cloud projects, and optimize cloud usage. RightScale also offers PlanForCloud.com, a free cloud cost management tool based on a global database of more than 12,000 price points from cloud providers, which enables organizations to perform sophisticated cloud cost forecasting. Since 2007, leading enterprises including Pearson International, Intercontinental Hotels Group, and PBS have launched millions of servers through RightScale.

    RightScale is a registered trademark of RightScale, Inc. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Other product or company names mentioned may be trademarks or trade names of their respective companies.
    http://www.marketwired.com/press-rel...rt-1992857.htm
    Última edição por 5ms; 22-02-2015 às 19:20.

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,020

    State of the Cloud's Real Story Isn't About Who is Winning

    Released just a couple days ago, RightScale's 2015 version of its State of the Cloud Report is an interesting read. There are pieces of the report that fits perfectly with assumptions. AWS continues to lead while Microsoft continues to creep forward. Google and VMware are behind in popularity, while Cloud adoption is growing. If you watch the industry long enough, you could probably write your own accurate report pretty.

    But, viewed from a different angle, there's quite a different story that is forming, and one I think is more interesting to watch.

    In the report, stats show the top tier is what we expected. AWS and Azure top the list of Enterprise Public Cloud usage.

    But, take a look again. What's not expected is that Rackspace has a growth lead over Google, VMware, IBM, and HP. And, not just that, but even with Google nipping at its heels, Rackspace is continuing to see increased adoption of its services. This is due in no small part, I believe, to a partnership between Rackspace and Microsoft for the Hybrid Cloud. Rackspace is surviving in the midst of giants. That says something about the company, its vision, and its ability to execute.

    But, there's an even bigger story brewing, and that is found at the very bottom of the stack. IBM has made significant publicly stated investments in the Cloud over the past couple years, but finds itself with only small improvements in standing from 2014 to 2015. And, even worse, HP, which has dedicated its internal resources to revamping its Cloud story, lost significant ground in single year and remains in dead last. The fight for dead last could result in more acquisitions. Who would be first to acquire VMware? HP or IBM? VMware vCloud Air has seen a significant drop in usage and seems right for the picking.

    One other note of interest from the report, one that shows VMware does have acquisition appeal and one that Microsoft should take note of, is the stats for the Private Cloud. It's obvious that Microsoft's intent is to push customers to a Public or Hybrid Cloud model, but it could be doing so at the expense of its current customers. According to other reports, companies are not moving to a completely hosted model anytime soon and will be nursing internal datacenters for several years to come. Shown in the following stat lines, VMware continues to lead the Private datacenter by a wide margin, while Microsoft is falling steadily behind. Maybe Microsoft cares less about this stat these days, but I'm sure there are those in the organization that this continues to cause nightmares.


    http://windowsitpro.com/cloud/state-...ut-who-winning

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,020

    Rackspace CEO Rhodes: Price Cut Curve is Flattening Out

    In ten years, most everything will be in a multi-tenant public cloud.

    By Tiernan Ray

    Following a report this afternoon by data center hosting service Rackspace Hosting of Q4 revenue that missed analysts’ expectations thanks to the rising dollar, CEO Taylor Rhodes was kind enough to take a few minutes to talk with me by phone.

    Rhodes sees Rackspace having transformed from its simpler hosting model into the leader of what the company calls “managed cloud” services, where a company pays Rackspace to make its applications more like the “multi-tenant” model of Amazon.com‘s “Amazon Web Services.”

    Signs of that include the company seeing more and more deals of $100,000 or more, some of it coming from competitors such as the telcos; rising organic revenue growth (it was 16.4% last quarter, excluding currency effects); and rising operating profit margin.

    Said Rhodes,

    I think the big macro story here is that the cloud market has been evolving. Our experience is with lots of customers, the early stage cloud was driven by developers, they were the early adopters. The mainstream market is really starting to move now. The mainstream market has two problems: They have legacy apps that won’t go multi-tenant automatically; they want single-tenant versions along the way; and the second problem they have is this skills set gap. Cheap infrastructure is just pouring gas on the fire. There is a need for software and tools development. Companies are saying, I don’t have access to people who know how to run all these things. Managed cloud is the hallmark of hybrid cloud and the economies of expertise.

    I asked if everything will ultimately go the way of the cloud. Rhodes responded,

    In ten years, most everything will be in a multi-tenant public cloud. In the meantime, there’s a step from the data center to the private cloud and multi-tenancy that will happen over the next five to seven years. As apps change, and compliance catches up, most new applications will go into a public cloud.

    By “public cloud,” Rhodes is referring to what he considers “true multitenancy” of applications, “with shared compute, storage, and networking,” versus a single-tenant server installation where all resources are private and constrained to that sole user/customer.

    Rhodes said the company is following the evolution of value from just installing servers to the new layers of the “stack,” providing greater expertise in management:

    The market always evolves. Ten years ago, every server got shipped in a palate, we built it buy hand, we changed out the RAM, etc. Nowadays, software solves all that provisioning, so the stack of where humans add value is constantly changing. Today, the value-add is not doing those things. If you’re running Oracle (ORCL) commerce platform, you better have an expert to make sure it doesn’t break. You’ve seen some of the scale we’ve been putting on the business the last couple quarters. We are getting away from bits and bytes into the real value conversation.

    I also asked Rhodes what he expects going forward in terms of price cuts. In past, cuts by Amazon and Google (GOOGL) and Microsoft (MSFT) have been big worries for Rackspace investors. Rhodes thinks some of the cutting is cooling off, even if it’s not going away:

    Amazon Web Services in November, for the first time, didn’t make a price cut move. Conversely, in March, Google did a masterful strategic thing and cut prices by 60%, though in reality, they had no revenue. But their doing that cost AWS a couple million dollars in revenue to be able to follow Google. What you may be seeing now is a flattening-out in the race. AWS is feeling that they are the kings in unmanged cloud. My prediction is we will see a flattening out of the curve even if price cuts don’t go away. AWS is feeling like they are the reference brand leader, that they are strong versus Google, so they don’t need to do it as much [cutting prices]. Microsoft is cutting price, but who knows how much share they are actually taking.

    Lastly, I asked Rhodes about the perennial topic of becoming a real-estate investment trust, or REIT, something a lot of telecom and services investors like to think about because of the large payouts. Rhodes is adamant it’s not for Rackspace:

    Not, that’s not for us. We use Digital Realty [Trust (DLR)] and DuPont [Fabros Technology (DFT)] to do the capital on the data centers. We add value through automation and innovation. We use their capital. It just doesn’t make sense for us. We don’t add value through the design and construction of the data center. Those guys can do it better through their access to capital and their expertise in real estate.

    http://blogs.barrons.com/techtraderd...lattening-out/

  4. #4
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,020
    Conversely, in March, Google did a masterful strategic thing and cut prices by 60%, though in reality, they had no revenue. But their doing that cost AWS a couple million dollars in revenue to be able to follow Google.
    Em Marte, é opinião comum que o Google anunciar "corte" de preços nessa área é a única forma de ser mencionado na imprensa.

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,020
    IaaS 2015 Usage

    The state of IaaS adoption from a Wikibon user survey - hosted live from IBM Interconnect


    CrowdChat on @wikibon results

    ...

    Stuart Miniman: what do you hear from CIOs about IBM's cloud strategy?

    Tim Crawford: I don't. SoftLayer presents a great opportunity. However, too quiet.

    Stuart Miniman: I hear more about BlueMix and all of the analytics, agree that IaaS (or hosted private cloud) is quiet...

    Tim Crawford: SoftLayer is a hidden gem for IBM. Lots of opportunity. But they need to change it up. I also hear more about BlueMix and Watson than SoftLayer.

    Dave Vellante: I'm impressed by what Azure is doing in the market - do you agree?

    Tim Crawford: I agree Dave! Azure is starting to garner increased attention. Most by a halo effect of 365.

    Tim Crawford: WRT SoftLayer, is the applicability and engagement that is missing.

    ...
    Transcript from #cloud survey and #IBMInterConect CrowdChat w @tcrawford @stu http://bit.ly/1Jno0q3
    Última edição por 5ms; 23-02-2015 às 20:38.

  6. #6
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,020
    BTW


    21,000 attendees at #IBMInterConnect this week in Vegas

    45% at an IBM show for the first time

Permissões de Postagem

  • Você não pode iniciar novos tópicos
  • Você não pode enviar respostas
  • Você não pode enviar anexos
  • Você não pode editar suas mensagens
  •