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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    15,004

    [EN] eNom: TRUSTe discontinuing Privacy Policies on April 30th, 2015

    We are writing to inform you that our vendor TRUSTe has decided to discontinue their TRUSTe Privacy Policies. We currently offer two TRUSTe privacy policies: "TRUSTe Privacy Policy" and "TRUSTe Privacy Policy with Seal", which we will be discontinuing effective April 30th, 2015.

    You will be able continue managing your existing TRUSTe Privacy policy until April 30th, 2015. In preparation for the change on April 30th, you will be required to remove any TRUSTe references on your website.

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    15,004

    Here's the background to yesterday's FTC order against TRUSTe privacy seal issues

    TRUSTe Settles FTC Charges it Deceived Consumers Through Its Privacy Seal Program

    Company Failed to Conduct Annual Recertifications, Facilitated Misrepresentation as Non-Profit

    November 17, 2014



    TRUSTe, Inc., a major provider of privacy certifications for online businesses, has agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that it deceived consumers about its recertification program for company’s privacy practices, as well as perpetuated its misrepresentation as a non-profit entity.

    TRUSTe provides seals to businesses that meet specific requirements for consumer privacy programs that it administers. TRUSTe seals assure consumers that businesses’ privacy practices are in compliance with specific privacy standards like the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework.

    “TRUSTe promised to hold companies accountable for protecting consumer privacy, but it fell short of that pledge,” said FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez. “Self-regulation plays an important role in helping to protect consumers. But when companies fail to live up to their promises to consumers, the FTC will not hesitate to take action."

    The FTC’s complaint alleges that from 2006 until January 2013, TRUSTe failed to conduct annual recertifications of companies holding TRUSTe privacy seals in over 1,000 incidences, despite providing information on its website that companies holding TRUSTe Certified Privacy Seals receive recertification every year.

    In addition, the FTC’s complaint alleges that since TRUSTe became a for-profit corporation in 2008, the company has failed to require companies using TRUSTe seals to update references to the organization’s non-profit status. Before converting from a non-profit to a for-profit, TRUSTe provided clients model language describing TRUSTe as a non-profit for use in their privacy policies.

    The proposed order announced today will help ensure that TRUSTe maintains a high standard of consumer protection going forward. Under the terms of its settlement with the FTC, TRUSTe will be prohibited from making misrepresentations about its certification process or timeline, as well as being barred from misrepresenting its corporate status or whether an entity participates in its program. In addition, TRUSTe must not provide other companies or entities the means to make misrepresentations about these facts, such as through incorrect or inaccurate model language.

    The settlement also requires the company in its role as a COPPA safe harbor to provide detailed information about its COPPA-related activities in its annual filing to the FTC, as well as maintaining comprehensive records about its COPPA safe harbor activities for ten years. Each of these provisions represents an increase in the reporting requirements laid out under the COPPA rule for safe harbor programs. The company must also pay $200,000 as part of the settlement.

    The Commission vote to accept the proposed consent agreement for public comment was 5-0. Chairwoman Ramirez, Commissioner Brill, and Commissioner McSweeny issued a joint supporting statement and Commissioner Ohlhausen issued a statement partially dissenting. The FTC will publish a description of the consent agreement package in the Federal Register shortly. The agreement will be subject to public comment for 30 days, beginning today and continuing through Dec. 17, 2014, after which the Commission will decide whether to make the proposed consent order final. Interested parties can submit comments electronically by following the instructions in the “Invitation To Comment” part of the “Supplementary Information” section.

    NOTE: The Commission issues an administrative complaint when it has “reason to believe” that the law has been or is being violated, and it appears to the Commission that a proceeding is in the public interest. When the Commission issues a consent order on a final basis, it carries the force of law with respect to future actions. Each violation of such an order may result in a civil penalty of up to $16,000.

    The Federal Trade Commission works for consumers to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices and to provide information to help spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint in English or Spanish, visit the FTC’s online Complaint Assistant or call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357). The FTC enters complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to more than 2,000 civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad. The FTC’s website provides free information on a variety of consumer topics. Like the FTC on Facebook (link is external), follow us on Twitter (link is external), and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.
    https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/pres...rs-through-its

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,004

    US regulator FTC Approves Final Order In TRUSTe privacy seal deception case

    FTC Approves Final Order In TRUSTe Privacy Case

    March 18, 2015

    After a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved a final order resolving the Commission’s complaint against TRUSTe, Inc. for deceiving consumers about its privacy seal program.

    The settlement was first announced in November 2014
    . In its complaint, the FTC alleged that TRUSTe failed to conduct promised annual recertifications of companies participating in its privacy seal program more than 1,000 times between 2006 and 2013. The complaint also alleged that TRUSTe misrepresented its status as a non-profit entity.

    Under the terms of the order, TRUSTe is prohibited from making misrepresentations about its certification process, its corporate status, or whether an entity participates in its programs. In addition, TRUSTe must not provide other companies or entities with the means to make misrepresentations about these facts, such as through incorrect or inaccurate model language.

    The order also requires the company in its role as a COPPA safe harbor to provide detailed information about its COPPA-related activities in its annual filing to the FTC, as well as maintaining comprehensive records about its COPPA safe harbor activities for ten years. Each of these provisions represents an increase in the reporting requirements laid out under the COPPA Rule for safe harbor programs. The company must also pay $200,000 as part of the settlement.

    The Commission vote to approve the final order and letters to commenters was 5-0.
    https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/pres...e-privacy-case

  4. #4
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,004

    TRUSTe Can't be Trusted

    TRUSTe, a company that is supposed to help consumers determine if online sites are secure enough to make online purchases, can't always be trusted, according to the FTC.

    Shopping on the Web has some inherent risks, and in many cases consumers have no real way to know how trustworthy the company behind a website really is. TRUSTe monitors many sites and issues a seal of approval if they pass muster. Many consumer advocates advise shoppers to look for that seal before sharing payment information.

    It turns out that TRUSTe's seal of approval may not mean all that much. The FTC said that although TRUSTe pledged to conduct annual recertification of companies with previously awarded seals, it frequently did not. In fact, it didn't recertify 1,000 companies during the years between 2006 and 2013, the FTC says.

    "TRUSTe promised to hold companies accountable for protecting consumer privacy, but it fell short of that pledge," FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez said in a press release.

    As part of a settlement with the FTC, TRUSTe agreed to pay a fine of $200,000 and stop misleading consumers about its service.

    TRUSTe CEO Chris Babel acknowledged the issues in a blog post and said they were fixed in 2013.

    "At TRUSTe we take very seriously the role we play in the privacy ecosystem and our commitment to supporting our customers. And if we fall short, we admit it, we address the issue, and we move forward," Babel wrote.
    http://www.cio.com/article/2849556/c...-ftc-says.html
    Última edição por 5ms; 21-03-2015 às 19:43.

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