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  1. #1
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    [EN] Bare-metal OS/2 rebirth

    A US software company has signed on with IBM to release a new native build of Big Blue's OS/2.

    Arca Noae said its "Blue Lion" build of OS/2 will run on the bare metal of PCs without the need for an emulator or hypervisor.

    Those still using the 28-year-old operating system and its applications typically run the stack in a virtualized environment on modern reliable hardware. The bare-metal OS will be freed from its virtual prison, and released to the world, in the third quarter of next year, we're told.

    "The focus will be on running a full OS/2 implementation on bare metal, not just in virtual machines," Arca Noae said, "and toward that goal we plan to do a considerable amount of testing on popular, industry-standard hardware."

    Arca Noae offers software and services for virtualized instances of OS/2 and various derivatives of the operating system built by third parties. The company said it has signed on with IBM as a business partner.

    Designed by IBM and Microsoft as a successor to Windows on IBM PCs, OS/2 failed to gain a major foothold in the computer market, but nonetheless continued development throughout the 1990s. The last build from IBM was released in 2001 and official support ended in 2006.

    Despite IBM's defeat, OS/2 lingered on in various specialist applications as well as embedded systems, such as bank ATMs and ticket kiosks. It has since maintained a niche following, and is still supported by third parties.

    Arca Noae hopes its new version of OS/2 will help to expand that audience and end the reliance on virtualization software.

    "This will be an independent, full OS/2 implementation for the modern environment, with updated drivers and other software, and all the software that you can run on OS/2 and eComStation will also run on Blue Lion," the company said.

    Arca Noae did not give any word on pricing. Pre-orders will not be offered until the software is ready for release.
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/11...rns_arca_noae/

  2. #2
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    Que sonho! O melhor SO que já usei até hoje...

  3. #3
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    Citação Postado originalmente por cresci Ver Post
    Que sonho! O melhor SO que já usei até hoje...
    Recentemente eu tomei conhecimento que o OS/2 é de fato o Windows NT

  4. #4
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    Essa informação eu li no Twitter de alguém da MS que trabalhou no desenvolvimento.

    Checando agora na abominável Wikipedia, a estória pode ser bem mais colorida

    ...

    The hiring of Dave Cutler, former VMS architect, in 1988 created an immediate competition with the OS/2 team, as Cutler did not think much of the OS/2 technology and wanted to build on his work at Digital rather than creating a "DOS plus". His "NT OS/2," was a completely new architecture.[19]

    IBM grew concerned about the delays in development of OS/2 2.0. Initially, the companies agreed that IBM would take over maintenance of OS/2 1.0 and development of OS/2 2.0, while Microsoft would continue development of OS/2 3.0. In the end, Microsoft decided to recast NT OS/2 3.0 as Windows NT, leaving all future OS/2 development to IBM. From a business perspective, it was logical to concentrate on a consumer line of operating systems based on DOS and Windows, and to prepare a new high-end system in such a way as to keep good compatibility with existing Windows applications. While waiting for this new high-end system to develop, Microsoft would still receive licensing money from Xenix and OS/2 sales. Windows NT's OS/2 heritage can be seen in its initial support for the HPFS filesystem, text mode OS/2 1.x applications, and OS/2 LAN Manager network support. Some early NT materials even included OS/2 copyright notices embedded in the software.[citation needed] One example of NT OS/2 1.x support is in the WIN2K resource kit. Windows NT could also support OS/2 1.x Presentation Manager and AVIO applications with the addition of the Windows NT Add-On Subsystem for Presentation Manager.[20]
    ...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OS/2

    Pessoalmente, eu credito ao Windows 2000 o inicio de alguma seriedade

  5. #5
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    Heheh eu comecei já no OS/2 Warp (o 3.0 da IBM)...

  6. #6
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    NT and OS/2

    Posted on July 26, 2010 by Michal Necasek

    OS/2 and Windows NT have an interesting and checkered common history. Until late 1990, the operating system eventually released as Windows NT was known as NT OS/2. Despite its name, NT had very little in common with OS/2 as it existed at the time (that is, OS/2 1.x) in terms of design or source code. The core NT design team led by Dave Cutler, mostly consisting of ex-Digital programmers, had very little experience with OS/2 or even PCs. At the same time, the plan was to provide compatibility with existing OS/2 applications and for OS/2 to be the dominant ‘personality’ of NT.

    The NT kernel’s (or more correctly the NT Executive’s) design was radically different from the design of OS/2 1.x. While OS/2 1.x was a 16-bit OS designed exclusively for the segmented architecture of the Intel 286/386 CPUs, NT was a portable 32-bit OS with paged virtual memory, deliberately ported to the 386 PC platform relatively late in its development cycle. While OS/2 could not run on anything but a 286/386 without a complete rewrite, NT could not run on a 286 ever.

    Dave Cutler did not get along at all with Gordon Letwin, Microsoft’s chief OS/2 architect. Cutler also had many clashes with Darryl Rubin, the lead developer of LAN Manager (which was OS/2 based at the time). [1]

    The relationship between NT and 32-bit OS/2 is very murky. It is known that Microsoft was working on 32-bit OS/2 2.0 in the late 1980s. It is also known that NT was initially meant to support a 32-bit OS/2 API, but that plan was later scrapped for obvious political reasons. At least one feature—exception handling—is so similar between OS/2 2.0 and NT and at the same so unique in context of other operating systems that it was clearly designed by the same group of people, and the implementations were intended to be compatible.

    In 1990, after Microsoft internally decided to dump OS/2 and concentrate entirely on Windows, most of Microsoft’s OS/2 developers were reassigned to NT. However, that did not influence the basic design of NT, which had been created long before then. NT adopted several technologies from OS/2, but very little or no code (16-bit Intel assembly code was of little use within NT). HPFS and FAT filesystem support was written from scratch for NT, the NDIS network driver interface underwent a major overhaul, LAN Manager components were rewritten.

    On a more mundane level, OS/2 was the platform used to build NT before NT became self-supporting. After all, who wanted to develop on DOS…. Aside from editors and compilers, OS/2 also ran the Intel i860 emulator used in the very early stages of NT development, before any hardware was available.

    After the Microsoft-IBM split, the relationship between NT and OS/2 became somewhat schizophrenic. Microsoft sometimes tried to pretend that OS/2 had never existed and sometimes loudly bad-mouthed anything IBM did with OS/2. At the same time, NT (up to and including Windows 2000) shipped with an OS/2 subsystem which ran character-mode 16-it OS/2 applications. Microsoft also had a Presentation Manager add-on for NT which supported OS/2 GUI applications, a semi-secret product hinted at in documentation but never actually advertised.

    In the end, Windows NT survived and OS/2 did not, although OS/2’s demise had arguably more to do with Windows 3.1 and Windows 95 than NT.

    [1] Zachary, G. Pascal (1994). Showstopper!. The Free Press/Macmillan. ISBN 0-02-935671-7

    http://www.os2museum.com/wp/nt-and-os2/

  7. #7
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    E eu hoje estou com uma saudade danada do OS/2: tentando instalar um SSD novo (sem clonar o HD antigo) num laptop Lenovo com UEFI está sendo um dos círculos do inferno. Nem Windows 10 consegue formatar, seja com disco em GPT ou MBR. O Ubuntu consegue formatar e instalar mas depois no segundo boot corrompe e dá erro na hora do boot. O Windows 7 fica pedindo drivers que não existem (o bicho foi feito pra Win8)...

  8. #8
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    Quem compra um notebook Lenovo adquire junto um titulo de sócio vitalicio e não transferível do Inferno Social Clube.

    Cada vez que ligo o meu, fico na expectativa de qual circulo vou desfrutar.

    Querer instalar um SSD é querer um passe para o Céu. Se conseguir, é caso de beatificação.
    Última edição por 5ms; 08-11-2015 às 14:23.

  9. #9
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    E isso porque o HD só existe pra ele (o conector é SFF-8784)...

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