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  1. #1
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    [EN] Red Hat e Microsoft firmam parceria celestial

    Paul Cormier, president, Products and Technologies, Red Hat
    November 4, 2015

    When I joined Red Hat in May 2001, “open” and “closed” were incredibly distinct. We introduced Red Hat Enterprise Linux to fill a gap in what we saw in enterprise technology - an open source, more secure, reliable operating platform with a long, stable lifecycle. In the years that followed, two operating systems emerged as mainstays in the datacenter: Windows and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. There were “Red Hat shops” and “Microsoft shops.” The idea of proprietary software companies embracing open source was hard for many to imagine.

    To say that enterprise IT has evolved a lot since then is a significant understatement. I have the opportunity to work with customers and partners around the globe, and I’ve never been more excited about the transformations I see in our industry. With those changes comes new thinking, new opportunities, and new challenges.

    The CIO now thinks about four footprints, spanning traditional bare metal (physical), virtual, private and public cloud. I’ve talked about how walls are breaking down and these four footprints are converging, causing CIOs and IT managers to rethink how they’ll interact and be used, secured and managed as one. We are constantly listening to our customers, and we have heard clearly that they want us to help them solve these challenges.

    Both Red Hat and Microsoft are key players in this new, hybrid cloud reality. Today, it is incredibly likely that where you once found “Red Hat shops” and “Microsoft shops,” you’ll find heterogeneous environments that include solutions from both companies. We heard from customers and partners that they wanted our solutions to work together - with consistent APIs, frameworks, management, and platforms. They not only wanted Red Hat offerings on Microsoft Azure, they wanted to be able to build .NET applications on infrastructure powered by Red Hat Enterprise Linux, including OpenShift, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform.

    As customers move to a microservices architecture, I see a consistent enterprise platform and APIs for certified applications and container portability across physical, virtual, and private and public clouds becoming that much more important. Customers will want to be able to choose Microsoft Windows for Windows containers, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host and OpenShift for certified Red Hat Enterprise Linux containers unified by the common .NET framework.

    Today marks a key moment in enterprise software history, with Red Hat and Microsoft announcing a new partnership to help customers solve these hybrid cloud challenges. While today’s news does not mark our first collaboration with Microsoft, it is by far our deepest, and I hope that customers, ISVs, and developers alike share our excitement as we work together to bring even more choice to hybrid cloud deployments.

    I’d be remiss if I did not comment on what today’s news means for the open source community. More than 24 years ago, when Linus Torvalds started work on Linux “just for fun,” even he could not have predicted how Linux and open source would change our world. But it did. Today, you can find open source, community-powered innovation everywhere, and it has truly changed the face of technology, from cloud computing and mobile to the Internet of Things and big data. Many companies that you would not have dreamed would either contribute to or embrace open source even 10 years ago now do. This is a great thing for both open source communities and consumers - more collaboration is always a good thing.
    http://www.redhat.com/en/about/blog/...-and-microsoft

  2. #2
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    Posted November 4, 2015 By Scott Guthrie - Executive Vice President, Cloud and Enterprise Group, Microsoft

    The cloud is changing the world, offering enterprises, independent software vendors (ISVs) and developers alike endless scale, speed and agility in a cost-effective way. I’ve been talking with customers about “why cloud” for years. Recently there has been a shift in these conversations, as the benefits have become undeniable. Now, for customers everywhere, the new question is “how cloud.”

    “How cloud” comes down to customers embracing the cloud on their terms. This shows up in two primary challenges that exemplify the importance of our partnership with Red Hat.

    1. Businesses continue to grapple with the challenge of bringing together existing on-premises investments with a cloud environment for greater speed, scale and cost benefits. Hybrid cloud has emerged as a way to solve this.
    2. Customers require flexibility and choice in their cloud investments across platforms, tools and languages. Simply put, they want to ensure that they can use what they already know and use today to take full advantage of what the cloud has to offer.


    The partnership we are announcing today with Red Hat extends our commitment to offer unmatched choice and flexibility in an enterprise-grade cloud experience across the hybrid cloud. With more than 80 percent of the Fortune 500 using Microsoft’s cloud, for us to team with the leader in enterprise Linux allows even more businesses to move to the cloud on their terms. By working with Red Hat, we will address common enterprise, ISV and developer needs for building, deploying and managing applications on Red Hat software across private and public clouds, including the following:

    • Red Hat solutions available natively to Microsoft Azure customers, including Red Hat Enterprise Linux applications and workloads as well as Red Hat application platform offerings. Available in the coming weeks, this includes Red Hat Enterprise Linux as well as the JBoss middleware platform.
    • Integrated enterprise-grade support spanning hybrid environments, with Red Hat and Microsoft co-locating support personnel to deliver an end-to-end enterprise support experience for Red Hat offerings on Microsoft Azure that is deeper and richer than any other public cloud offering. This experience will enable enterprises to move their production Red Hat solutions to the public cloud with confidence. Co-locating support will be available in the next few weeks.
    • Collaboration on .NET for a new generation of application development capabilities, providing access to .NET technologies across Red Hat offerings, including OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux, which will be available within the next few weeks.
    • Unified workload management across hybrid cloud deployments, including integration between Red Hat CloudForms and Microsoft Azure and System Center Virtual Machine Manager to manage Red Hat Enterprise Linux on both Hyper-V and Microsoft Azure. Support for managing Azure workloads from Red Hat CloudForms is expected to be added in the next few months.


    Later today I’ll be joining Paul Cormier, Red Hat’s president of Products and Technologies, on a webcast to talk more about the partnership and answer your questions. You can check it out here at 11 a.m. ET/8 a.m. PT to learn more about how flexibility and choice have united Microsoft and Red Hat to meet customers where they are on their cloud journey. For full details on the partnership, you can also read the press release and the Red Hat Blog.

    http://blogs.microsoft.com/blog/2015...ty-and-choice/
    Última edição por 5ms; 05-11-2015 às 13:24.

  3. #3
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    Microsoft, Red Hat Partnership Signifies a Rapidly Evolving IT Ecosystem

    By Susan Hall

    Although the fiercest of rivals in the enterprise IT space, Microsoft and Red Hat have struck up a partnership to make Red Hat’s Linux the “preferred” choice for enterprise computing on Microsoft’s Azure cloud.

    “This is a more comprehensive partnership than with any of our other cloud partners,” said Paul Cormier, Red Hat’s president for products and technologies, who, along with Scott Guthrie, executive vice president for Microsoft’s Cloud and Enterprise division, introduced the pairing in a webcast press conference Wednesday.

    It’s a move to “embrace the hybrid world,” as Cormier put it. “Together, we’re offering the most comprehensive support agreement for our mixed technologies to support customers,” he said.

    Microsoft and Cary, N.C.-based Red Hat have been longtime rivals. Both offer enterprise infrastructure stacks, one based on Windows, the other on Linux. Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer once called Linux “a cancer.” However, when asked what brought the two companies to this point, Cormier and Guthrie cited customer demand.

    In historical terms, this is a monumental announcement, said Al Hilwa, program director of software development research at IDC, though he added it was only a matter of time before the “new” Microsoft struck a deal of this sort.

    “The new Microsoft has taken bold new steps and has been on a path to partner with its fiercest rivals of past years,” Hilwa said. “The company has embraced Linux in its Azure cloud and is doing more in open source than ever. Still, this is a win for both companies and for the vast set of customers they have in common.”

    “There’s not going to be any finger-pointing, saying, ‘It’s not my problem.’ Both vendors are standing behind it to make sure it’s successful,” Cormier said. To make sure this happens, the two companies said they would co-locate engineers – starting in Microsoft’s hometown of Redmond, Wash. – to collaborate on support.

    The two also announced:

    • Support for hybrid clouds using Red Hat technologies on Azure.
    • .NET integration and availability with Red Hat Enterprise (RHEL) including Atomic Host and OpenShift. RHEL will be the primary development and reference operating system for .NET Core on Linux.
    • Windows supported on Red Hat’s OpenStack platform and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization.
    • Management tooling integrations with Red Hat CloudForms.
    • Microsoft joins the Red Hat Certified Cloud Service Provider (CCSP) program.
    • A pay-as-you-go consumption model for Red Hat products on Azure.
    • Integration of CloudForms with both Azure and System Center VMM for workload management in hybrid environments.
    • RHEL Atomic Host available on Azure as a container host.


    From a developer standpoint, Cormier pointed to opening up the OpenShift platform-as-a-service as an opportunity for .NET developers. They can create .NET applications for RHEL-based containers or use JBoss or .NET to connect services across platforms.

    Developers can use JBoss for containers that run on Azure with full enterprise support. They can gain that support while using Microsoft’s Java SDK, Guthrie pointed out.

    Among the other points they made:

    • Red Hat subscriptions become portable to Azure at all support levels.
    • It will apply to RHEL versions 6 and higher.
    • Any ISV technology supported on RHEL will work on Azure.
    • Microsoft is not working on making OpenStack run natively at this point. It’s working to make OpenShift, RHEL and JBoss work effectively from an application and workload perspective.


    When asked what this “preferred” status means for their other cloud partners, Cormier and Guthrie danced around the issue. The Wall Street Journal pointed to a Deutsche Bank research report that estimated, for instance, that almost half of Red Hat’s roughly $100 million in revenue from cloud services comes from Amazon accounts, a chief rival to Azure.

    “We have found Microsoft to be very committed to making Linux work well on Azure and are not surprised at the move. Ubuntu is the majority choice for Linux on the cloud, in every cloud, with or without Red Hat’s presence,” Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, said of the deal.

    Still Frenemies

    Guthrie pointed to new CEO Satya Nadella’s focus on making Microsoft more customer-centric as a reason for buddying up with the largest enterprise Linux vendor. Nadella has said “Microsoft loves Linux,” and about a quarter of its business on Azure is Linux-based and about half of the workloads from China are.

    The situation is similar to a deal the two vendors did in 2009 when they each joined each other’s virtualization partner programs, but both pointed out it wasn’t a partnership, according to Jay Lyman, research manager for cloud platforms for 451 Research.

    “[This highlights] the fact this was driven not by the companies liking each other and joining up, but mostly by customers,” he said.

    “Just as it was then, Microsoft’s customers today demand support for Red Hat and other open source technologies such as RHEL, and customers and users of Red Hat and other open source software demand support for Microsoft technologies such as .NET and Azure.

    “This also highlights the ongoing pervasiveness of polyglot programming, whereby software applications and services are built on a much broader array of components in a best-tool-for-the-job approach. Both Red Hat and Microsoft contribute significant, useful and credible parts of polyglot – it makes perfect sense that they more deeply and effectively integrate and support one another’s software,” Lyman said.

    Strategically, this is what is it takes to be a player at scale in the cloud platform war – and it’s an important move for Microsoft it its bid to compete among the top players, says Hilwa.

    IDC believes that a significant portion of the two companies’ customers use both their technologies strategically.

    “This partnership will allow their joint customers to use a wide cross-section of both company’s technologies in a more integrated fashion and, for the first time, with the blessing and deep support from both vendors.”

    Red Hat is a sponsor of The New Stack.
    http://thenewstack.io/microsoft-red-...ing-ecosystem/

  4. #4
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    Fiquei com preguiça de ler... O que tá rolando?
    Alexandre Silva Hostert

    Veezon
    Gerenciamento de Servidores


    http://veezon.com.br
    http://br.linkedin.com/in/alexandreveezon

  5. #5
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    Citação Postado originalmente por AlexandreVeezon Ver Post
    Fiquei com preguiça de ler... O que tá rolando?
    Resumo maldoso:

    • Canonical foi sacaneada pela Microsoft
    • .NET vai rodar no Red Hat
    • RedHat está diversificando. Estava muito dependente da AWS

  6. #6
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    kkkkkk

    .NET no Red Hat? Não curti. Já vejo o pessoal pedindo: "Coloca ASP no meu cPanel"
    Diversificando, tipo Azure?
    Alexandre Silva Hostert

    Veezon
    Gerenciamento de Servidores


    http://veezon.com.br
    http://br.linkedin.com/in/alexandreveezon

  7. #7
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    Citação Postado originalmente por AlexandreVeezon Ver Post
    kkkkkk

    .NET no Red Hat? Não curti. Já vejo o pessoal pedindo: "Coloca ASP no meu cPanel"
    Diversificando, tipo Azure?
    Exatamente.

    ... Microsoft and Red Hat have struck up a partnership to make Red Hat’s Linux the “preferred” choice for enterprise computing on Microsoft’s Azure cloud.


    ... almost half of Red Hat’s roughly $100 million in revenue from cloud services comes from Amazon accounts, a chief rival to Azure.

  8. #8
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    É, parece que o Azure vem ganhando terreno, então não é de admirar a estratégia deles.
    Alexandre Silva Hostert

    Veezon
    Gerenciamento de Servidores


    http://veezon.com.br
    http://br.linkedin.com/in/alexandreveezon

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