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  1. #1
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    [EN] Netflix agora em 130 paises e 200 até o fim do ano

    Netflix, which has been spending aggressively to expand globally, has said it planned to "run around break-even through 2016" and then deliver profits.

    Netflix goes global, reaches most countries except China
    By Lehar Maan and Anya George Tharakan
    Wed Jan 6, 2016 6:26pm EST

    Netflix Inc's video-streaming service went live in more than 130 countries on Wednesday, covering almost the entire globe except China, in a huge global push by Chief Executive Reed Hastings to counter slowing growth in the United States.

    Shares of the company, whose popular shows include "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt", "Daredevil" and "Narcos", jumped 9.3 percent to close at $117.68.

    India, Nigeria, Russia and Saudi Arabia were among the major countries where the service was launched, Hastings said at a speech at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

    "(This is) much sooner and much more ambitious than expected," Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter said.

    Netflix, which had expanded into more than 60 countries before Wednesday's launch, previously said it aimed to reach 200 countries by the end of 2016.

    However, all shows will not be available immediately to some Netflix fans.

    "We're moving as quickly as we can to have global availability of all the content on Netflix," Hastings said at a press conference after his speech.

    U.S. government restrictions on American companies mean Netflix will not be available in Crimea, North Korea and Syria.

    The company is still exploring options for providing its service in China, the world's most populous country. Asked if Netflix will make it into the Chinese market in 2016, Hastings said in an interview "we hope so, but you never know."

    "With China, you really want to build relationships first, before you get to the practical parts of building a business," he said. "And so we are doing that now and getting to know people, both in government and in partner companies."

    "We’ll just keep working on the relationships," he said. "We are very patient. Whether it is 2016, 2017, we’ll just keep working on it."

    Netflix on Wednesday added simplified and traditional Chinese to the 17 languages it already supports.

    "I think there's been pent-up demand for Netflix outside of the few geographies they were available in previously," Brian Blau, research director at Gartner, told Reuters.

    Netflix, which has been spending aggressively to expand globally, has said it planned to "run around break-even through 2016" and then deliver profits.
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-te...0UK28Z20160106

  2. #2
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    Pelo jeito, o Youtube pode acabar sendo mais um megafracasso global da Anarfa Beta.

  3. #3
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    The Counterintuitive Tech Behind Netflix’s Worldwide Launch

    In the end, the expansion of Netflix may be a bigger deal for Internet providers than it is for Netflix itself.

    Netflix just expanded into 130 new countries, now reaching just about every nation on Earth. And that’s a big deal—not just for Netflix and its viewers, but for the Internet as a whole.

    For most Internet services, expanding into foreign markets isn’t very hard. Somebody translates a few app menus into a new language, and that’s that. But Netflix is different. To stream TV shows and movies into foreign countries, it must negotiate a whole new set of rights with those that own the content. And it must deal with all that extra bandwidth. Here in North America, Netflix accounts for about 35 percent of all Internet traffic—far more than any other service, including YouTube—and when it expands into a foreign market, it can top 20 percent of all traffic in as little as 18 months, according to Sandvine, an outfit that tracks Internet usage across the globe.

    In pushing so much data across the network, Netflix must worry about performance. We all know how annoying things get when the network bogs down and videos start stuttering. But the company must also consider the cost. Moving such massive amounts of video isn’t cheap.

    In fact, as Netflix expands, local Internet providers must worry about cost and performance as well. After all, they operate the networks that will carry all that video—and they’ll get at least some of the blame when videos start stuttering. The expansion of NetFlix may be a bigger deal for the Internet providers than it is for Netflix itself.

    The good news is that Netflix has spent many years learning to deal with these issues. As it turns out, according to those familiar with the world of Internet content delivery, market forces operate in a rather counterintuitive way that allows Netflix to push into new regions with relatively few technological changes—at least initially. The changes come later, once NetFlix really starts to take off in a new country. Ironically, it’s the enormous rise in bandwidth that drives these changes—not the other way around.

    In a nutshell, when the company debuts in a new market, it can deliver video from afar. That can be a burden for Netflix and for local Internet providers. But when the providers start to feel that burden, Netflix delivers a solution: It gets inside the Internet provider—and video streaming becomes more efficient for everyone.

    Cutting in the Middleman

    This is particularly likely with the company’s latest expansion, even though this is its largest rollout thus far. According to Dan Deeth, who helps track Internet traffic trends at Sandvine, the initial impact of the expansion won’t be as great as it might seem, because so many of the countries are part of the developing world. Yes, Netflix has expanded into just about every country but China, including South Korea, Poland, India, and Turkey. But in many countries, the technical and financial infrastructure won’t necessarily allow for rapid uptake of the service. And at least for now, that takes some of the burden off the shoulders of Netflix.

    “I expect it to grow slower in some of these new markets,” Deeth says, pointing out that many customers won’t be able to so easily pay for Netflix because they don’t have credit cards. And many others will be slow to embrace the service because they access the Internet only through cell phones, which aren’t as NetFlix friendly as TVs and PCs. Their screens are smaller, and their network connections are slimmer.

    That said, Deeth does anticipate Netflix eventually will grab a significant amount of traffic in many of these countries, and that will necessitate a technological expansion. Over the years, the company has dealt with those enormous performance and cost burdens by building its own content delivery network, or CDN, a network of Netflix computers that sit inside local Internet providers and do nothing but deliver Netflix video to nearby consumers. This follows in the footsteps of a similar networks Google built to deliver YouTube videos. Before announcing the company’s global push during his keynote at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas today, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings showed a map of the company’s CDN—known as Open Connect—and said it’s delivering video in more than 60 countries and streaming more than 125 million hours of content each day in the Americas, Europe, and the Asia Pacific region.



    Judging from Hastings’ map, it appears the company is expanding its CDN further into Asia and into southern Africa (Netflix did not respond to a request for comment). But this doesn’t really cover the new regions the company’s just moved into. It doesn’t have to, says Matthew Prince, CEO of Cloudflare, which operates a similar CDN that any business can use. Even if large numbers of people adopt Netflix in a new country, the company can pipe the video in from afar, using middleman networks that are designed to shuttle large amounts of traffic from place to place.

    “The nature of the Internet is that, as long as you’re connected to it somewhere, you should be able to get to any other point on the network,” Prince says. “As it expands into these new countries, it may be that they are servicing these countries form outside the countries.”

    Operated by companies like Level 3 and Cogent, middleman networks are known in industry jargon as “transit,” and even with video, these can work pretty well. As Prince notes, Netflix uses the video player in your home to cache a stream as it comes and continue to play video even when the stream is slowed. The bigger problem, he says, is that transit can cost Netflix large amounts of money.

    At the same time, this can put a huge burden on the local Internet providers that must move the video from the transit networks and into customer homes. But if the burden gets too big, these providers can install the Netflix CDN machines. That will cut their costs—and cut Netflix’s costs too. “Netflix will become such a large user of bandwidth in all of these different countries,” Prince says. “The countries’ telecoms will then start asking for [CDN machines], and that will allow Netflix to deliver content less expensively than just about anyone else on earth.”

    Balancing the Boxes

    Hastings made a point of saying Netflix gives these machines away to Internet providers. That’s true. But as Deeth says, providers incur the cost of operating them and not all will agree to adopt them. “They may give you the box,” he says of NetFlix. “But the box costs you power and space.”

    This is a bit of a balancing act for the company. Some Internet providers have argued that Netflix should pay them to deliver all this video, sparking some enormous—and public—battles. But Prince says this is less of an issue as Netflix continues to expand beyond the US.

    In the US, consumers expect Internet providers to deliver unlimited data for a flat fee. But, Prince says, this is less true overseas. Internet providers often change higher rates to deliver more data. That means they’re more inclined to welcome the arrival of Netflix. “Netflix has often had a contentious relationship with ISPs like Comcast,” he says. “But if Comcast is able to charge more because you’re watching Netflix, suddenly Netflix becomes Comcast’s best friend. In countries where customers are metered based on the bandwidth they use, Netflix coming in isn’t as much of a threat.”

    Many were surprised that Netflix moved so quickly into so many countries. Deeth was among them. But as he says, the company isn’t new to this kind of expansion. “Netflix has gotten very good at this.”
    http://www.wired.com/2016/01/the-cou...ldwide-launch/

  4. #4
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    Can Netflix Grow to 200M Subs by 2020?

    The big question is how are the AT&Ts and Comcast’s of the world going to respond?

    January 8, 2016 Ernie

    If Netflix grows its subscriber base to 100M by 2020, would that be considered a major accomplishment? Not really. However, if Netflix grows its subscribers to 200M, that would be major. A couple of days ago at CES, Netflix announced it added more than 130 countries to its current portfolio of 50 countries, which means they can stream to pretty much anywhere in the world. At last count, Netflix had 60M subscribers, so if they grow their subs to 100M by 2020, that’s 10M new subs per year, not much when taking into account the global population metrics. We predict Netflix will reach 200M subs by 2020 and is likely to surpass Comcast in market valuation. Of course this is just a hunch, and its not based on any data, because there is no historical data that could predict such an outcome. The big question is how are the AT&Ts and Comcast’s of the world going to respond?
    https://www.bizety.com/2016/01/08/ne...-than-comcast/

  5. #5
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    Netflix 2016: think global, worry about local later

    One of the biggest announcements at this year’s CES was Netflix’s launch of a new global player that effectively makes the service available in every country on Earth except China, North Korea, Syria, and Crimea. (Netflix is working on China separately to deal with regulatory issues. It’s currently illegal under US law for US-based companies to do business with the other three.)

    From the press release:

    “Today you are witnessing the birth of a new global Internet TV network,” said [Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed] Hastings. “With this launch, consumers around the world – from Singapore to St. Petersburg, from San Francisco to Sao Paulo – will be able to enjoy TV shows and movies simultaneously – no more waiting. With the help of the Internet, we are putting power in consumers’ hands to watch whenever, wherever and on whatever device.”

    The announcement not only means Netflix achieved its goal of global expansion a year ahead of schedule, it also means almost every pay-TV operator on the planet now has Netflix as a competitor.

    That's not necessarly a bad thing. For markets where OTT video is already part of the competitive pay-TV landscape (in Asia, see: HOOQ, iflix, Viu, Presto, etc), adding Netflix to the mix won’t add much more pressure than is already there.

    More to the point, as Colin Dixon of nScreenMedia notes, Netflix had to cut some corners to go global that could put it at a disadvantage to the incumbents:

    Much of the content in the global service is available only in English, and it only supports 20 languages (after just adding Korean, Arabic and Simplified and Traditional Chinese.) According to the press release the service is available for “one low price,” which certainly doesn’t reflect the differences in wages around the world. For example, the ability of people in the Congo to pay (where per capita GDP is $394) is vastly different to Qatar (where per capita GDP is $105,000.)

    When questioned about producing different versions of movies and shows to suit different markets, neither executive appeared to have thought very deeply about it, with Mr. Hastings responding “we’ll have to see and we’ll have to learn.” This seems naïve as it is virtually certain that censors in China will demand edited version of marquee shows. […] This issue will quickly emerge as a critical one for the company, as countries react to the uncensored content by blocking the service.

    There’s also the issue of marketing, Dixon adds:

    ... as the company found in the UK, and is seeing again in Germany, real growth is hard work and requires local knowledge to execute well. The billing issue was also glossed over with a peremptory “we learned a lot in Latin America.”

    How much Netflix has learned, and how they will manage that aspect across 194 countries remains to be seen. Meanwhile, that lack of local presence is a detail that incumbent players would be wise to exploit early.
    http://www.telecomasia.net/blog/cont...ut-local-later

  6. #6
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    Netflix global field of dreams: now it’s built, will they come?

    06 Jan, 2016 Colin Dixon

    With the release of the Netflix global player, the company is now available in 194 of the 197 countries worldwide. This is an amazing achievement, but is the company prepared to sustain and build a global audience?

    I discussed last year how the only way Netflix would be able to meet its goal of worldwide access by the end of 2016 was by releasing a global player. That is precisely what Netflix announced on Tuesday at CES 2016. Reed Hastings, Netflix CEO, said the service was immediately available in 130 new countries. The only countries left without Netflix are China, where the company is seeking specific permission to launch service, and 3 regions where, under US law, it is illegal to do business: North Korea, Syria, and Crimea (subject to a dispute between Ukraine and Russia.)

    One of the strategic imperatives for the company has been obtaining global licenses to content. Last year, Netflix’ content head Ted Sarandos said persuading content owners to license globally, rather than regionally as they have traditionally done, has been a major challenge. However, he made it clear at CES that this was now a requirement:

    Every new dollar we spend is for global content and global rights. So when you see a show come on Netflix it will be available everywhere.”

    That position seems to apply equally to content the company licenses from third parties and produces itself.

    Achieving this global release almost a year ahead of schedule is an impressive achievement, though the company did have to cut corners a lot to get there. Much of the content in the global service is available only in English, and it only supports 20 languages (after just adding Korean, Arabic and Simplified and Traditional Chinese.) According to the press release the service is available for “one low price,” which certainly doesn’t reflect the differences in wages around the world. For example, the ability of people in the Congo to pay (where per capita GDP is $394) is vastly different to Qatar (where per capita GDP is $105,000.)

    When questioned about producing different versions of movies and shows to suit different markets, neither executive appeared to have thought very deeply about it, with Mr. Hastings responding “we’ll have to see and we’ll have to learn.” This seems naïve as it is virtually certain that censors in China will demand edited version of marquee shows. I can’t imagine what Indian authorities will make of the lesbian lovemaking scene in the first episode of Sense8. This issue will quickly emerge as a critical one for the company, as countries react to the uncensored content by blocking the service.

    It was not apparent how the company would market the new offering. Mr. Hastings said that he had heard from people everywhere asking when they would be able to get Netflix. However, as the company found in the UK, and is seeing again in Germany, real growth is hard work and requires local knowledge to execute well. The billing issue was also glossed over with a peremptory “we learned a lot in Latin America.”

    What does the global release mean for the growth in subscribers? In the short term, Netflix will see a massive spike in those on a free trial. This should lead to a substantial bump in paying subscribers, though conversions from free to paying are liable to be much lower than the company has ever seen before. Beyond that, it is very hard say.

    That said, it is clear that global availability sets Netflix apart from every other video service in the world. Where else can a premium content provider license content and see it instantly reach a massive global audience? Netflix is producing shows and movies all over the world, but while it produces the content regionally it expects the finished product to appeal globally.

    Netflix is beginning to think and act from a global audience perspective, and this will exert an ever stronger pull on the rest of the content world to do the same.

    Why it matters

    With the release of the global service, Netflix achieved its goal of worldwide availability a year early.

    However, the company made compromises and omissions to get there.

    Some of these will surely come back to haunt the company later.

    Notwithstanding these issues, the new worldwide Netflix will be a force driving needed change in the content industry.
    http://www.nscreenmedia.com/6147-2/

  7. #7
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    Kenya film board brands Netflix a threat to security

    Netflix’s rollout to 130 new countries has hit turbulence after Kenya branded it a threat to national security and said the streaming service shows “shockingly explicit eroticism” that could corrupt children’s morals.

    Jackson Kosgey, chairman of Kenya’s film classification board, said on Wednesday he would seek talks with the content-streaming service that he claimed was operating in east Africa’s largest economy without a licence.

    He told a press conference that the service would probably be banned if some content that risked radicalising young people was not blocked, John Aglionby reports from Nairobi.

    Netflix is embarking on an aggressive push into overseas markets as subscriber growth slows in the US. Kenya was one of 130 new markets Netflix pushed into earlier in January in a move that tripled the number of countries it operates in.

    Without referencing anything specific, the KFCB said that “if such content is allowed without scrutiny by our regulatory standards, the country is bound to open a floodgate for extremist and radicalising content, particularly within view-on-demand and pay platforms.”

    There is disagreement among Kenya’s regulators over how Netflix should be categorised. While the KFCB is keen to regulate it closely, others have adopted a more relaxed attitude.

    Francis Wangusi, the director-general of the Communication Authority, told local media last week that Netflix was not a traditional broadcaster but an online platform. These do not require licences to operate in Kenya, where there is no internet censorship and the media is largely free.
    http://www.ft.com/fastft/2016/01/20/...t-to-security/

  8. #8
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    KFCB: Netflix is a threat to the country’s “moral values and national security”

    “The board regards this development as a gross contravention of the laws governing film and broadcast content distribution in Kenya”

    Lily Kuo | Quartz Africa
    20/01/2016

    Netflix’s introduction to East Africa’s largest economy isn’t going so well. The Kenya Film Classification Board (KFCB), the government body that regulates all visual media in the country, called the streaming service a threat to the country’s “moral values and national security” and said it would seek to block the service if inappropriate content was not dealt with.

    At a press conference in Nairobi, the KFCB said Netflix had not sought a license before it began operating in the country two weeks ago and that the regulator would like to speak with the company.

    “The board regards this development as a gross contravention of the laws governing film and broadcast content distribution in Kenya,” KFCB chairman Jackson Kosgei said in a statement emailed to Quartz. He added that Kenya could not afford to be a “passive recipient of foreign content that could corrupt the moral values of our children.”

    The sentiment is part of ongoing confusion and debate over how to define and regulate Netflix, now available throughout Africa. Another regulator, Kenya’s Communications Authority, says that Netflix should not be treated as a traditional broadcaster because it operates more like online platforms such as YouTube or Facebook, which haven’t required special licenses.

    The KFCB—whose mission is to safe guard “national values and norms”—also linked the debate over Netflix to the country’s ongoing fight against al-Shabaab militants. The Somali-based Islamists recently attacked a Kenyan military base, killing as many as 100 soldiers, by the group’s own count. The KFCB said in its statement:

    “The board holds the view that in this era of global terrorism, including broadcasts over the internet by terrorist entities, vigilance is the price of safety and prevention. As Kenyans, we therefore need to ask all the right questions about the unregulated arrival and future of Netflix in the country. We need to ponder its implications in light of the ongoing war on terror by questioning the manner and nature of Netflix’s introduction of services in Kenya.”

    Earlier this month, the Communications Authority barred radio stations from broadcasting shows that mention sex during peak listening hours. Daytime radio shows featuring candid and often graphic discussions about sex are common in Nairobi, where much of the listening audience is composed of city commuters stuck in traffic. The regulator also banned preachers from asking for money on radio shows.

    Critics say these new attempts to regulate the media have more to do with controlling public forums for free expression than protecting children. Kenyan journalist Joseph Warangu wrote, “We might soon live in a country where the police decide who makes it to heaven and where the government approves when it is suitable to dive under the sheets for intimacy.”
    http://qz.com/598521/kenyas-film-reg...onal-security/
    Última edição por 5ms; 20-01-2016 às 12:31.

  9. #9
    Aspirante a Evangelist
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    Citação Postado originalmente por 5ms Ver Post
    “The board regards this development as a gross contravention of the laws governing film and broadcast content distribution in Kenya”



    http://qz.com/598521/kenyas-film-reg...onal-security/

    Nada que uns bons pixulecos não resolvam.

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