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  1. #1
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    [EN] Pew: U.S. Home Broadband 2015

    The share of Americans with broadband at home has plateaued, and more rely only on their smartphones for online access

    Artigo: http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/12/2...roadband-2015/

    Complete Report (PDF, 33p): http://www.pewinternet.org/files/201...ption-full.pdf

  2. #2
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    Verizon makes 50 Mbps its default FiOS speed

    Verizon is now offering 50 Mbps as its default speed tier at a time when overall new subscriber growth is leveling off as it penetrates its existing markets.

    Similar to earlier quarters, Verizon reported in the fourth quarter of 2014 of that more FiOS customers were subscribing to 50 Mbps symmetrical FiOS Internet tiers or a higher tier like 75 Mbps.

    Fran Shammo, CFO of Verizon, told investors during the fourth quarter earnings call that more of its customers are subscribing to higher data speeds.

    "The increasing importance of Internet is evident as more customers are requesting higher data speeds," Shammo said. "At the end of the quarter, more than 70 percent of our consumer FiOS Internet customers subscribed to data speeds of 50 Mbps or higher and we shifted our introductory offers to 50 Mbps."

    Shammo said a big part of FiOS Internet growth is coming from subscribers that only want Internet service and not linear TV service. Customer interest continues to grow for Custom TV, which represented about one-third of FiOS video sales in fourth quarter of 2015.

    "The demand for FiOS-only is increasing, while we are continuing to see a demand in linear TV," Shammo said.

    However, Verizon added just 99,000 new FiOS Internet subscribers in the fourth quarter, much lower than the 145,000 subscribers it added in the same period a year ago.

    Even with the decline in overall new subscribers, Verizon reported that the growth of FiOS broadband and video drove fourth quarter wireline consumer wireline revenues of $4.1 billion, an increase of 2.6 percent compared with fourth-quarter 2014. FiOS revenues represented 80.4 percent of the total.

    Here's a breakdown of Verizon's key wireline metrics:

    Broadband and video: FiOS broadband was again a key factor in Verizon's wireline wireline results. During the quarter, the service provider added 99,000 new FiOS Internet connections and 20,000 new FiOS video connections. It ended the year with a total of 7 million FiOS Internet and 5.8 million FiOS video customers, representing year-over-year increases of 6.3 percent and 3.2 percent, respectively.

    FiOS Internet penetration was 41.8 percent at the end of 2014, up slightly from 41.1 percent at the end of 2014. In the same periods, FiOS video penetration was 35.3 percent, compared with 35.8 percent.

    Business and wholesale: Verizon reported $3.2 billion in Global Enterprise sales, down 3.3 percent year-over-year from $3.4 billion in fourth quarter of 2014.

    During the fourth quarter, Verizon Enterprise Solutions won new contracts with The Kroger Company and Advance Auto Parts and a number of energy companies such as Sunoco and FirstEnergy.

    "In the enterprise space, secular and economic challenges remain, but we are seeing stabilization on a constant currency basis," Shammo said. "

    Likewise, Verizon reported that it saw similar pain in Global Wholesale where revenues declined .2 percent year-over-year in the fourth quarter to $1.49 billion from $1.5 billion in the same period a year ago.

    "While this quarter improved due to seasonal impacts, we remain cautious on the wholesale business and believe that a 4 to 5 percent decline is more indicative on the underlying trend for the full year 2016," Shammo said.

    Overall Verizon's operating revenues were $34.3 billion, up 3.2 percent from fourth-quarter 2014. For the full year, Verizon reported total consolidated revenues of $131.6 billion.
    http://www.fiercetelecom.com/story/v...99k/2016-01-21

  3. #3
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    Verizon invests over $1.8B in New York state network, scales FiOS to 4M homes

    January 22, 2016 | By Sean Buckley

    Verizon told the New York Assembly Committee on Corporations, Authorities and Commissions in a hearing this week that it invested over $1.8 billion in the state's wireline and wireless networks in 2014, refuting criticism that it has not lived up to its buildout commitments.

    The telco said that it is committed building out new wireline and wireless services in the state. On the wireline side, Verizon said it built out its FiOS FTTH service to over 4 million New York state homes and businesses, for example.

    FiOS was once again the revenue star for Verizon's wireline results in the fourth quarter. Driven by the addition of 99,000 new FiOS Internet connections and 20,000 new FiOS video connections, Verizon's wireline revenues were $4.1 billion, up 2.6 percent compared with fourth-quarter 2014. However, the telco's FiOS Internet additions were down from the 145,000 subscribers it added in the same period a year ago, suggesting that it saturating its existing markets.

    During the hearing, Verizon encouraged the state to adopt regulatory reforms that it said would drive new technology investments, particularly in areas where consumers and businesses can chose from a host of telcos and cable operators for service. It also claimed that customer complaint rates "are at their lowest levels in recent years and continue to improve."

    The company's claims are in response to a host of critics who claim the telco has been turning its back on its traditional copper-based wireline network while refusing to build out FiOS in new areas of the state.

    In October 2015, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman sent letters to executives at Verizon, Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) and Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC) to get an understanding if these providers charged consumers for speeds slower than what they advertised. One of the key issues related to the speed problem stems from the interconnection agreements that Verizon has in place with long-haul Internet transit providers such as Cogent and Level 3.

    Earlier, Schneiderman wrote a letter to the NYPSC asking the state regulator to investigate Verizon and look at how the deregulation of the New York telecom market is impacting businesses and consumers.

    Meanwhile, an audit conducted by New York City's Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications found that Verizon failed to deliver on its promise to provide fiber-optic service for television and broadband to anyone who wants them by 2014.

    Verizon refuted the audit saying that it was based upon erroneous information and incorrect interpretations of the company's franchise deal that was signed with the city in 2008, which allowed it to deploy FiOS throughout the city.

    More recently, a group of elected officials and residents in the Co-Op City development of New York's Bronx borough announced they will hold a rally today in a plea to get the telco to offer FiOS internet, phone and television.

    Co-Op City isn't the only city that's called on Verizon to extend FTTH service to their community.

    A group of 14 city mayors on the East Coast to expand its FiOS FTTH network into more areas that have limited access to high speed services. However, Verizon has been adamant that it has no plans to extend FiOS into any new areas outside of those communities where it has established a franchise agreement to deliver service.

    For more:
    - see the release
    http://www.fiercetelecom.com/story/v...mes/2016-01-22

  4. #4
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    Survey: 56% of pay-TV customers would ditch ESPN in order to save $8 every month

    ESPN will find it challenging to launch a direct-to-consumer streaming platform to recapture former customers who leave the pay-TV ecosystem, or never join. Launching such a service would remove contractual protections with pay-TV operators to keep ESPN and ESPN 2 in top programming tiers, forcing subscribers who don't watch the channels to pay for them anyway.

    January 13, 2016 | By Daniel Frankel

    More than half of pay-TV subscribers surveyed -- 56 percent -- said they'd ditch ESPN in order to save $8 every month on their multichannel bill.

    Further, only 6 percent of respondents said they'd pay $20 a month for a direct-to-consumer ESPN platform.

    The data comes courtesy of research firm Civic Science, which interviewed 1,582 consumers last week, of which 1,370 (87 percent) currently subscribed to pay-TV. BTIG Research analyst Richard Greenfield unearthed the report while continuing to express dire concern about ESPN's ongoing business model.

    "We continue to believe ESPN is in serious trouble as they spent far too heavily on long-term sports rights contracts, given the deteriorating state of the multichannel video bundle and accelerating shift of TV ad dollars to mobile," said Greenfield while introducing the Civic Science data. "Simply put, ESPN has been the largest beneficiary of the 'BIG' cable bundle for decades and is now dramatically over-earning, with consumers the biggest losers."

    The most expensive channel in the pay-TV bundle, ESPN has been the subject of much analyst hand-wringing since it was revealed last summer that the national sports programming conglomerate had lost about 7 million subscribers over the last two years.

    Earlier this week, another little recognized research company, Beta Research, released the results of an ad agency survey, indicating that an industry-leading 63 percent of ad purchasing executives planned to spend even more money on ESPN this year.

    However, the Civic Science data does seem troubling to the Disney-owned sports media conglomerate. As Greenfield notes, ESPN will find it challenging to launch a direct-to-consumer streaming platform to recapture former customers who leave the pay-TV ecosystem, or never join. Launching such a service would remove contractual protections with pay-TV operators to keep ESPN and ESPN 2 in top programming tiers, forcing subscribers who don't watch the channels to pay for them anyway.

    As the Civic Science data seems to point out, without that protection, a major portion of pay-TV subscribers -- 60 percent of female customers -- would ditch ESPN to save money.
    http://www.fiercecable.com/story/sur...nth/2016-01-13
    Última edição por 5ms; 23-01-2016 às 11:30.

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