Resultados 1 a 2 de 2
  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,032

    [EN] Walmart Says it Can Cut Your Cloud Costs

    OneOps aims to provide the freedom to move between clouds, moving the battle to services layered on top of the Infrastructure-as-a-Service.




    Walmart Makes It Easier To Switch Clouds With OneOps

    Justin Warren
    Jan 26, 2016


    Walmart has open sourced the OneOps software that the company acquired as part of its purchase of the eponymous company OneOps in 2013.

    Walmart purchased OneOps as part of its move to convert its own eCommerce software from a monolithic application “deployed once every two months” into a “best-in-class global e-commerce platform.”

    Walmart says the software will help developers to write applications that can work in different clouds with ease, which was part of the offering from OneOps when it was a private startup company.

    “This means they can test and switch between different cloud providers to take advantage of better pricing, technology, and scalability – without being locked in to one cloud provider,” the company said in a statement posted on the walmartlabs.com website.

    In what looks like a subtle dig at rival Amazon.com, Walmart justifies releasing OneOps as open source software because “Walmart is a cloud user, not a cloud provider. It makes sense for Walmart to release OneOps as an open source project so that the community can improve or build ways for it to adapt to existing technology.”

    But does it?

    Walmart is no stranger to using technology to assist with selling a large volume and variety of goods to many buyers. Like any large retail chain, data plays an important part in running the business profitably, as Target recently learned at great cost. The logistical challenges of ensuring that stock arrives in the right place at the right time is just one of thousands of problems that requires modern technology to address.

    However Walmart is not the font of all knowledge and new development. OpenStack, on which much of Walmart’s eCommerce system is based, did not spring forth from Walmart. Walmart has people smart enough to know that the great strides in new IT systems are likely to happen outside the company, not solely within it.

    Walmart is also, by its own admission, more of a user of these systems than a provider. If Walmart believed the OneOps technology gave it a competitive advantage, why share that advantage with others? There doesn’t appear to be a compelling reason for Walmart to keep the software an internal secret.

    But that isn’t the same as a reason to release the software. Releasing it, and managing the ecosystem around it, will cost money to do, so Walmart must see some advantage; the company is hardly known as an altruistic organisation.

    What if Walmart could promote competition for cloud resources? That will surely hurt Amazon more than Walmart. And look at the list of supported clouds. Microsoft Azure is listed, supported by Azure, yet while Amazon Web Services is listed as supported, it is supported by… @WalmartLabs.

    Microsoft has a clear incentive to reduce the barrier to exit for AWS customers, (as does Rackspace, despite their recent partnership with AWS) and Walmart can benefit by hurting Amazon. OneOps aims to provide the freedom to move between clouds, moving the battle to services layered on top of the Infrastructure-as-a-Service, where Microsoft believes (not without cause) that they have a stronger case.

    This looks to me like another shot in the ongoing war of attrition fought between the major public cloud vendors, and Walmart as a customer stands to benefit–through lower prices–no matter who wins.
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/justinwa...s-with-oneops/
    Última edição por 5ms; 27-01-2016 às 06:49.

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,032

    OneOps, An Open-Source Cloud And Application Lifecycle Management Platform

    OneOps works with multiple public and private cloud platforms out of the box. These include Microsoft Azure, Rackspace, AWS and CenturyLink Cloud, as well as any OpenStack cloud

    Today, about 3,000 engineers within Walmart use OneOps to build and manage new products. Its e-commerce sites like walmart.com and Sam’s Club are managed through OneOps.

    Frederic Lardinois

    Walmart (yes, that Walmart), is launching a new open source DevOps platform for cloud and application lifecycle management. OneOps, which was developed by Walmart Labs, is meant to help developers write and launch their apps faster and make maintaining them easier.

    The company first announced its plans to open source the service last year.

    “Our mission is to give our customers the most agile, cost-effective, flexible application lifecycle management solution for enterprise-class workloads in the cloud,” the team says.

    While Walmart may seem like an odd company to launch a tool like this, there can be little doubt that few other legacy retailers have used technology to their advantage to the degree that Walmart has. As the company notes today, though, it’s a cloud user and not a cloud provider.

    “It makes sense for Walmart to release OneOps as an open source project so that the community can improve or build ways for it to adapt to existing technology,” Walmart CTO Jeremy King and WalmartLabs VP of Platforms Tim Kimmet write in today’s announcement. “We are no stranger to open source. We’ve been an active contributor, releasing technologies such as Mupd8 and hapi with the community.”

    OneOps was actually founded in 2011 and Walmart acquired it in 2013. Today, about 3,000 engineers within the company use it to build and manage new products. Its e-commerce sites like walmart.com and Sam’s Club are managed through OneOps. The company says its engineers use the platform to commit over 30,000 changes per month.

    So what can OneOps actually do? According to Walmart, one of the key benefits of the platform is that it works with multiple public and private cloud platforms out of the box. These include Microsoft Azure, Rackspace, AWS and CenturyLink Cloud, as well as any OpenStack cloud (Walmart was an early adopter of OpenStack and is still one of its largest users).

    “Greater control of cloud environment means that instead of cloud providers dictating what proprietary tools and technologies we have to use, or how much bandwidth we can have, OneOps puts the control back into the hands of developers,” the team writes today.

    The team says it also worked with the NoSQL database company Couchbase to integrate its product into its stack. OneOps is also set up to work with technologies like Node.js, Docker, ElasticSearch and many others.

    Other features of OneOps include monitoring tools, auto-healing and -replace when things go wrong, and auto-scaling tools to manage the size of a given cluster. For admins, the platform also offers integration with enterprise identity services, quota management, as well as a configuration management system.

    The code for the project is now available on GitHub. “Walmart continues to make important contributions to open source and we’re looking forward to seeing how the GitHub community engages with OneOps,” GitHub VP of Product Management Kakul Srivastava said. “It’s great to see a retail giant also become a software giant.”
    http://techcrunch.com/2016/01/26/wal...ment-platform/
    Última edição por 5ms; 27-01-2016 às 06:57.

Permissões de Postagem

  • Você não pode iniciar novos tópicos
  • Você não pode enviar respostas
  • Você não pode enviar anexos
  • Você não pode editar suas mensagens
  •