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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Post [EN] Brasil: Multi-Tenant Data Center Market Overview (2014)

    Cushman & Wakefield Global Data Center Advisory Group Report - May/2014




    STILL CONSIDERED AN EMERGING MARKET

    • Despite being the seventh largest economy in the world, there is currently less than 500,000 sf of operational data center space in Brazil — this is smaller than the data center inventory of Miami (+600,000 sf) which is considered only a tertiary market in the U.S.

    • There are currently only three U.S.-based data center providers in Brazil:
    - Equinix (who acquired local provider ALOG)
    - Level 3 Communications (via its acquisition of Global Crossing)
    - Verizon (via Terremark)

    • Pan-regional telco companies are also key providers, including Spain-based Telefonica and Mexico-based America Movil (who acquired and owns Brazil’s Embratel since 2003).

    • Most facilities are less than 10,000 sf and have densities of less than 100 watts per square foot.

    • Significant outages are common.

    • Terremark NAP do Brasil facility in Tambore is considered one of the key data centers in Brazil. The facility offers connectivity to all major carriers in Brazil and has interconnectivity with Terremark’s NAP of the Americas facility in Miami.

    LIMITED WHOLESALE MARKET

    • Only a limited handful of operators are currently capable of providing a solution for a deployment larger than 500 kW.

    • The beginning of a legitimate wholesale market in Brazil only emerged in 2012. However, within 12 months over 15 MW of wholesale space has been leased in the State of São Paulo.

    • Colocation providers focus on “value-add” services such as managed hosting, cloud, IT outsourcing, etc. which comprise upwards of 60% of revenue.

    • Several international data center providers are vetting expansion opportunities in the country, including driven by customer expansion needs in Tambore and oil and gas sector demand in Rio de Janeiro.

    KEY SUBMARKETS

    SÃO PAULO

    • Largest data center market in South America that accounts for 50% of capacity in Brazil — approximately 450,000 operational square feet. Demand driven by financial institutions and multi-national firms. Located near the stock exchange, the suburb of Barueri is emerging as the new data center centric area. Major providers include: Telefonica-Vivo, T-Systems, ALOG-Equinix, Terremark-Verizon, Level 3, UOLDiveo, Matrix, Ascenty and Oi.

    • The Campinas and Hortolandia region — located approximately 50+ miles outside of São Paulo — is known as the “Brazilian Silicon Valley.” Ascenty, IBM, Lucent, Samsung, Dell, Nortel, 3M Ericsson and Texas Instruments are all located in the region.

    • The first wholesale data center options in the country are being offered in Campinas, with capacity following in the areas of Hortolandia, Jundiai and Fortaleza.

    • IBM, Microsoft and Amazon are the largest MTDC enterprise data center occupants, all with deployments greater than 10 MW.


    RIO DE JANEIRO

    • Second largest data center market in Brazil – operational square footage less than 150,000 sf.

    • Providers include ALOG-Equinix, Oi, Tivit and Level 3.

    • Many oil & gas companies, including Petrobras, are headquartered in this market.


    SECONDARY LOCATIONS

    • Belo Horizonte/Minais Gerais – south east Brazil.

    • Porto Alegre – southern Brazil.

    • Recife – north east, fast-growing tech cluster around Porto Digital innovation center.


    IMO a inconsistência da narrativa quando se refere à área dos data centers prejudica um melhor aproveitamento do relatório.

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
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    Colocation Brazil - datacentermap.com/brazil

    Belo Horizonte
    1. Ativas Data Center S.A
    2. Valspe Soluções



    Brasilia

    1. Engetronics Brasilia



    Campinas - SP

    1. Algar Tech
    2. Ascenty Data Center



    Curitiba

    1. ASAWEB
    2. GVT Curitiba



    Garuva - SC

    1. GRVXHost



    Goiania

    1. Link Data Center



    Guarulhos - SP

    1. GVT Guarulhos



    Joao Pessoa

    1. HostDime Brazil



    Madalena - PE

    1. HOTlink



    Natal

    1. Albergue da Web



    Niterói - RJ
    1. EMMEX - Data Center



    Porto Alegre

    1. KingHost



    Ribeirão Preto - SP

    1. RPO_DC



    Rio de Janeiro

    1. Data Center Rio
    2. ALOG-RJ
    3. Level 3 Rio De Janeiro
    4. GVT Rio de Janeiro
    5. HEXAM2
    6. R4C Networks



    Santa Maria - RS

    1. Coração do Rio Grande



    São Geraldo - RS

    1. Adentro



    São José do Rio Preto - SP

    1. cdznet data center



    Sao Paulo

    1. ALOG-SP
    2. Locaweb JK
    3. Locaweb Itapaiuna
    4. Matrix
    5. UOLDIVEO Tamboré (largest Datacenter in Latin America)
    6. UOLDIVEO Glete
    7. Connect Web



    Uberlandia - MG

    1. Algar Tech




    http://www.datacentermap.com/brazil/

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    14,992

    Ascent CEO: Brazil presents great opportunity, challenge

    A twist of fate changed Ascenty CEO Chris Torto from tourist into trailblazer.

    “It was the mid-80s, and I was trying to move to Italy,” said Torto, who is currently on his fourth business venture in Brazil. “My parents migrated from Italy to the (United States) in the 1920s, and I wanted to get out of the United States. The company I was working for said we’ve got nothing for you in Italy, but we have an opening in Brazil. That’s how I ended up here.”

    The Boston native found himself moving to Brazil in 1988. Since that time, Torto has taken two companies public and helped start his own cable TV company. If there is anyone who understands Brazil’s infrastructure needs, it’s him. Torto, who splits his time between San Francisco and Brazil, shared some of his experiences navigating the market.

    How has the push for the Internet Civil Law in the local government affected your business?

    I think that even before (the bill) you had a lot of multinational companies wanting to have a physical presence in Brazil independent of the law. So you’ve got this happening. What I’ve seen with the law, which has been going on for about a year now, is that some of those plans are just getting accelerated. Independent whether Brazil has a law or not, companies realize it makes a lot of sense to have a physical presence, to have low latencies, to have better service closer to the customer by installing in Brazil. All it has really done is expedite plans that these companies had originally. So they can then say, well I already had it installed. I wasn’t doing it because of the law. We’ve seen that from a number of different companies, that have signed with us as well.

    What should your clients understand about doing business in Brazil?

    Brazil is one of those countries where there are unique dynamics to many of the laws. You have to know the area. It makes it difficult for many American companies because they are accustomed to strict by-the-books guidelines whereas in Brazil there is a need to work with the government on several issues. You are always in a dispute because things are so poorly written from a legislative statement that you’re always in discussion. It just makes it tough for U.S. companies when they come down because they see it and go, boy there is a lot of gray area. How do we manage this? Without that experience it is difficult.

    How much has the landscape for business changed since you arrived?

    It’s improved dramatically since 1988 when I first moved to Brazil.

    It’s night and day. What has not changed is the bureaucratic nature of the country. It’s a difficult place to do business. It’s very bureaucratic. Beyond the costs, there is just a tremendous amount of legislation on taxes. We have more people working in our tax department than our accounting department just because there are so many forms to fill out. That’s a cost in and of itself. It was the same 25 years ago as it is today. And what we’re trying to do whether working with a large U.S. company, multinational company, or even local, we’re trying to make it easy. If you come to us, we’ll take care of the bureaucracy and you can just focus on your business. And that’s why we’ve been successful getting Microsoft and Amazon as customers. Because we make it easy for them.

    What are the issues that challenge business?

    The security issue in Brazil is something that is a challenge. It’s not a rock solid safe place, but it’s not this militia out roaming the streets that gets portrayed in the press. That’s not what’s happening. I’ve lived there for 26 years, and I’ve never been robbed. I’ve never had a single issue. So it’s a little blown out of proportion by the media.

    Power costs are a concern. The reality of the situation is that power costs are significantly higher than in the U.S. If you’re paying anywhere from five to 12 cents (in the United States), Brazil is closer to 15 to 16 cents per kilowatt an hour. So power costs are higher.

    Second, importing anything specialty in terms of servers or IT equipment, there’s a pretty hefty importation tax. You can build your case around it, but it’s significantly higher than the U.S. On average, if a server cost me a grand in the U.S., it’s probably going to cost me $2,000 in Brazil. That’s a reality. So it is more expensive to maintain an IT environment in Brazil than the U.S., but at the same time, why is Microsoft, why is Amazon, why are all these guys doing large deployments in Brazil? Because they have to be closer to their customers and latency is an issue.

    What will it take to make Brazil on par with U.S. data center standards?

    That’s not going to happen. It’s always going to be a developing country. It’s always going to be a challenge, but it’s a large country with 200 plus million people and high technology usage. Brazil is a top three market for both Facebook and Twitter. You can see they’re early adopters of technology, so you can’t ignore it. Independent of the difficulties, you just have to find a way to make it work. It’s never going to become Ashburn Virgina, not in our lifetimes.

    My realistic feeling is that it is a market that can’t be ignored. It’s a huge market. It’s going to grow, and it’s going to grow anywhere between two and four percent every year. That’s not China growth, but it’s not negative growth. It’s always going to be a difficult place to do business. It’s a highly bureaucratic country, and that to me is a barrier to entry. Data center guys want to go and just pull out because life is short for them. But for the guys that have to be there, we’re in the perfect position to serve them.

    What is unique about Ascenty in the marketplace?

    We’re the only ones currently out there building Tier III data centers for the wholesale market in Brazil. So we actually have the service to offer these customers that looks and feels like products in more established, mature markets. I think the second thing is our agility. We’re flexible, we’re agile, and we’re willing to do basically anything — if it makes business sense of course — to make it viable for the customer.

    I’ll give you an example: the first time we allowed a U.S. company’s technical team a chance to review our one lines and suggest changes, and we took those suggestions and actually implemented them. It’s the first time that has ever happened for them.

    We’re a much more entrepreneurial company. At other global data center providers, you essentially have to navigate multiple levels to get anything done. At the end of the day, at our company you can talk to me or anyone of my direct reports. We’ll review with our team, we’ll make a decision and we’ll make it the same day.

    We see huge opportunity. We’re opportunistic, obviously. To be honest with you, we weren’t even focusing on the wholesale data center opportunity a year ago. Now we’re seeing there’s so much demand for it, we might have to accelerate our plans on a lot of different fronts. So I think we’re being opportunistic on this side.
    Cushman & Wakefield Global Data Center Advisory Group Report (Maio/2014)
    Última edição por 5ms; 02-02-2016 às 12:44.

  4. #4
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    Entry point: Brazil 2014

    DATA CENTER DEMAND DRIVERS


    POPULATION

    • With a population of 200 million, Brazil is the fifth-largest country in the world and ranks as the seventh largest economy.

    • Brazil ranks fifth globally in number of internet users (99 million) and fourth in number of mobile phones in use (271 million).

    • Smart phone usage has accelerated, although Brazil still has very low smart phone penetration showing tremendous potential.


    CONNECTIVITY & INFRASTRUCTURE

    • Brazil has the most mature fiber infrastructure and best connectivity in Latin America to the U.S.

    • Terrestrial fiber infrastructure within Brazil (and Latin America in general) has inconsistent coverage and capacity.

    • High capacity bandwidth is expensive when available and dark fiber
    is a scarce resource.

    • There are several accelerated efforts underway to install new submarine fiber routes to Brazil before the World Cup and Olympics which will drive down future bandwidth costs.


    OIL & GAS INDUSTRY

    • Despite recent domestic industry struggles, the discovery of huge amounts of oil in the deep-sea “pre-salt layer” will drive heavy long-term investment.


    WORLD STAGE

    • Brazil is hosting two of the largest international sporting events in the upcoming years, including the World Cup in 2014 and the 2016 Summer Olympics.



    MARKET CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES

    Like any emerging market, Brazil presents unique challenges for international companies interested in navigating its business market. However, Brazil stacks up favorably to other BRIC nations, where power grid challenges, privacy issues and ownership limitations in countries like India and China have proven too prohibitive and undesirable for most tenants and enterprises to tackle.

    Many American companies — from Dell to Hewlett Packard to Amazon — have successfully built and now operate data centers in the country, showing Brazil is a preferred destination when compared to other emerging markets with the spate of recent data enter expansions largely the result of foreign investment (primarily U.S.).


    TAX ISSUES AND HURDLES

    • Brazil’s taxes, duties and customs taxes are high and very complex and are a critical factor to consider regarding deployment, importation and overall operations.

    • It is difficult to avoid importation of major mechanical and electrical systems required for large data centers because larger size equipment is not available. Servers and network equipment can be sourced
    domestically thereby reducing tariffs.

    • Corporate Income Tax Rate: 34-40% (total).

    • Limited incentives in place for data centers currently.


    SKILLED LABOR CONCERNS

    • Brazil is currently facing a shortage of trained IT professionals, with an estimated shortfall of 750,000 workers by 2020 – among the highest globally.

    • Strong unions and work rules are a challenge to a data center’s 24/7 operating standards.


    IMPACT OF INTERNET LEGISLATION

    • In late March, Brazilian lawmakers amended legislation (Marco Civil da Internet) so it no longer contains a provision requiring Internet companies (including hybrid or cloud services) to store data on local servers in the country.

    • However, there are still broad international concerns about the privacy/security of online data and future proposed rules and guidelines about data localization need to be closely monitored.


    ADVANTAGEOUS PROPERTY RIGHTS

    • Unlike India and China, foreign entities are permitted full property rights in Brazil, a key differentiator among emerging markets.


    LIMITED RISK FROM NATURAL DISASTERS

    • No natural disaster risk in the São Paulo market. Flood risk in parts of Rio de Janeiro. Tornadoes only prevalent in northern-most part of the country.

    • Landslides during the rainy season impact private property and public infrastructure for power, telecommunications and transportation mainly in the Rio de Janeiro region.



    CRITICAL FACTORS


    POWER INFRASTRUCTURE

    • Brazil’s power infrastructure has historically been inferior to that of the U.S. in terms of availability and reliability. However, this gap is dwindling as infrastructure enhancements ahead of the World Cup and Olympics will boost power capacity and fortify its electrical grid and distribution infrastructure.

    • More than 70% power derived from hydro-electric often leading to seasonal and drought-related shortages.

    • Transmission and generation is under government control.

    • Distribution is geographically based and fragmented, largely controlled by the private sector.

    • AES Electropaulo and CPFL are the largest distributors serving sizable areas within the State of São Paulo.


    AVAILABILITY & DEPENDABILITY

    • Each municipality has its own transmission network with no major cross connections to establish regional or national grids, raising reliability concerns.

    • Most areas have only one provider, leaving many data center operators with difficulty and long timelines to bring in diverse power feeds.

    • Frequency and duration of interruptions vary by distributor. National annual averages are approximately 12 interruptions and over 16 hours, in line with other Latin American countries.

    • Brazil usually fails to meet demand and is a net importer of power.


    PRICING

    • Cost of generation is low because of the amount of hydro power, though it is subject to price fluctuation and supply shortage in drought years.

    • Delivered cost of electricity is high mostly due to multiple taxes at the federal, state and local levels.

    • Average pricing US$0.15-0.16 per kWh.

    • Power may be purchased on the open market for large power users but is subject to large price fluctuations.


    NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE

    • Brazil has the most mature fiber infrastructure in South America, however it is substandard compared to the U.S. market.

    • 10 submarine cables bring fiber to the country, with the majority making landfall at Fortaleza before funneling to São Paulo or Rio de Janeiro.

    • Virtually all of South America’s connectivity is non-terrestrial/submarine-based and as a result suffers greater latency due to longer-than-necessary cable routes. São Paolo is nearly 4,000 miles from Miami (the closest mature telecom hub for South America).


    KEY INTERNET EXCHANGES

    • PTT maintains the main internet exchange points in Brazil (22 in total) including the most important exchange point in São Paulo.

    • The dominant telecom and ISP carriers in Brazil, Embratel and Telefonica, do not participate in settlement-free peering resulting in network congestion and performance issues.

    • NAP of the Americas (Terremark/Verizon) is a major internet exchange point for all of Latin America. Located in Miami, it is estimated that over 80% of all internet traffic from Central and South America pass through this location.

    • Terremark/Verizon’s facility in Baueri is a major network access point for many international and domestic telecom providers.


    NEWS/TRENDS

    • In preparation for the World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics, Brazil will see several new submarine fiber cables installed, including WASACE (to Nigeria, Miami and Virginia Beach), Seabras-1 (to New York), AMX-1 (Rio to Miami) and BRICS Cable (to Russia, China and India).


    DATA CENTER SIZE MATURITY: GLOBAL MARKET COMPARISON






    Cushman & Wakefield Global Data Center Advisory Group Report (Maio/2014)

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Ascenty

    Campinas

    • 5.000m² de área construída e 2.400m² de piso elevado para TI;
    • Capacidade para 800 racks ou 32.000 servidores em três módulos independentes;
    • Potência total de 6,2 MVA e capacidade de energia disponível de 3,7 MVA para TI;
    • Sistema de energia Tri-bus numa configuração N+1;
    • Sistema de geração a diesel numa configuração N+3, sendo um total de 9 unidades de 1.260 KVA cada, totalizando 11.340 KVA de potência;
    • Dois tanques de diesel que permitem aos geradores uma autonomia de 40 horas sem reabastecimento;
    • PUE (power usage effectiveness) de 1,65;
    • UPS estática de 750 KVA, numa configuração N+3 com baterias de longa duração para cada módulo;
    • Capacidade de refrigeração de 540 TR, com expansão direta e redundância N+4 para cada módulo;



    Jundiaí

    • Terreno de 11.000m², com um prédio de 7.000m² de área total e 3.500m² de piso elevado para TI;
    • Capacidade para 1.200 racks ou 57.600 servidores em quatro módulos independentes;
    • Potência total de 25 MVA e capacidade de energia disponível para TI de 14,5 MVA;
    • Sistema de energia Tri-bus numa configuração N+1;
    • Subestação própria no terreno, com entrada redundante de energia em alta tensão 138 KV e com transformadores redundantes de 20/25 MVA;
    • 4 tanques de diesel que permitem aos geradores uma autonomia de 40 horas sem reabastecimento;
    • PUE (power usage effectiveness) de 1,6;
    • UPS rotativa a diesel, com capacidade total de 37,5 MVA numa configuração N+5;
    • Capacidade de refrigeração total de 4.250 TR, com sistema de chillers com anel duplo de água gelada e de refrigeração de 1.062,5 TR, com expansão direta e redundância N+2 para cada módulo;
    • Sistema de água gelada com chillers a ar de alto desempenho com sistema Rapid Restore, com redundância N+2;
    • Sistema de resfriamento interno operando nos corredores técnicos laterais com redundância N+6;




    Hortolândia

    • 5.000m² de área construída e 2.700m² de piso elevado para TI;
    • Capacidade para 900 racks ou 43.200 servidores em três módulos independentes;
    • Potência total de 20 MVA e capacidade de energia disponível para TI de 10,5 MVA;
    • Sistema de energia Tri-bus numa configuração N+1;
    • Subestação própria no terreno, com entrada redundante de energia em alta tensão 138 KV e com transformadores redundantes de 15/20 MVA;
    • Sistema de geração a diesel numa configuração N+4, sendo um total de 12 UPS rotativa a diesel de 2.500 KVA cada, totalizando 30.000 KVA de potência;
    • 4 tanques de diesel que permitem aos geradores uma autonomia de 40 horas sem reabastecimento;
    • PUE (power usage effectiveness) de 1,6;
    • UPS rotativa a diesel, com capacidade total de 27 MVA numa configuração N+4;
    • Capacidade de refrigeração total de 3.400 TR, com sistema de chillers com anel duplo de água gelada;
    • Sistema de água gelada com chillers a ar de alto desempenho com sistema Rapid Restore, com redundância N+2;
    • Sistema de resfriamento interno operando nos corredores técnicos laterais com redundância N+6;




    Fortaleza

    • 9.500 m² de área total e 4.500 m² de piso elevado para TI;
    • Capacidade para 1.350 racks ou aproximadamente 60.000 servidores em seis módulos independentes;
    • Potência total de 13,5 MVA e capacidade de energia disponível de 6 MW para TI;
    • Sistema de energia Tri-bus numa configuração N+1;
    • Sistema de geração a diesel numa configuração N+3, sendo um total de 9 UPS rotativas a diesel de 2.250 KVA cada, totalizando 20.25 MVA de potência;
    • Autonomia dos tanques de diesel de 40 horas sem reabastecimento;
    • PUE (power usage effectiveness) de 1,75;
    • UPS rotativa a diesel (N+1), com 9 unidades de 2.250 KVA cada;
    • Capacidade de refrigeração de 1.700 TR, com expansão direta e redundância N+4 para cada;



    São Paulo

    • Potência total de 25 MVA (12 MVA disponível para TI);
    • Sistema de energia com distribuição em Tri-bus N+1;
    • Subestação própria, com entrada redundante de energia em alta tensão 138 KV e com transformadores redundantes de 25 MVA;
    • Sistemas de fornecimento de diesel que permitem aos geradores uma autonomia de 48 horas sem reabastecimento
    • PUE (power usage effectiveness) de 1,7;
    • UPS rotativa à diesel em configuração N+5, com 15 unidades de 2.500 KVA cada.
    • Capacidade de refrigeração total de 4.250 TR, com sistema de chillers com anel duplo de água gelada;
    • Sistema de água gelada com chillers a ar de alto desempenho com sistema Rapid Restore, com redundância N+2;
    • Sistema de resfriamento interno operando nos corredores técnicos laterais com redundância N+4;

  6. #6
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,992

    Verizon’s NAP do Brasil

    • 17,250 m2 total area
    • 3,400 m2 colocation space
    • Guaranteed power availability of 99.992%
    • Redundant power transmissions feeds, from independent substations of 13.8KV, provided by Eletropaulo
    • Six diesel generators in (N+1) configuration powering a total of 6 MVA
    • 90,000 liters of diesel fuel providing continuous operation for three days at full load
    • Eight redundant uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems with 500kVA each, totaling
    • 4 MVA redundant
    • Increments of 05 AMP, 10 AMP, or 20 AMP circuit AC backed power
    • Increments of DC 20 AMP – 48 Volts DC circuit A&B feed
    • Five chillers with air condensation, each one with 298 tons of air-handling capacity
    • Six redundant water-cooling pumps from primary and secondary circuits
    • Temperature maintained at = 21.5ºC ± 3.5ºC
    • Relative humidity maintained at = 50% ± 10%
    • High-capacity direct connection with the NAP of the Americas in Miami, where more than 160 carriers are available
    • Connected to Verizon’s peering fabric
    • Zero-mile connection with the most important domestic and international carriers
    • Located in a gated industrial park at Barueri, São Paulo


    http://www.verizonenterprise.com/inf...nap-do-brazil/

  7. #7
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,992

    UOLDIVEO Glete

    • Área total construída de 6.400 m2 distribuida em 8 andares
    • Capacidade "para mais de 30 mil servidores"
    • Elevador para até quatro toneladas.
    • Laje e piso com capacidade de 1.500 Kg/m2
    • Capacidade total de 12 MVA
    • Subestação de energia com circuitos subterrâneos redundantes
    • 4 andares de data center com alimentação por barramentos de energia e sistemas de UPSŽs redundantes e independentes para cada sala
    • Continuidade garantida por quatro geradores de 3 MVA, configurados em sistema N+1
    • Tanques de diesel de alta capacidade alimentam os geradores, para autonomia de 72 horas de operação sem reabastecimento
    • Capacidade térmica de 15 milhoes de BTUs
    • Arquitetura de anel duplo e redundante, alimentado por um conjunto de chillers de 350 TR cada


    http://www.whtop.com/review/uolhost.uol.com.br

  8. #8
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,992

    Equinix Rio de Janeiro

    More than 3,600+ square meters (38,750+ square feet) of colocation space

    Rio de Janeiro - RJ1


    • Electrical Capacity – up to 4.0 kVA per cabinet
    • UPS Configuration – Bus A: 7 x 160 kVA (864 kW) N+1; and Bus B: 4 x 300 kVA (540 kW) N+1
    • Utility Feeders – 2 lines (N+1): 13.2 kV
    • Power Transformers – UPS system: 2 x 2,000 kVA; refrigeration and other loads: 2 x 2.000 kVA
    • Utility Voltage – 208 / 120V
    • Standby Power Config. – 2.300 kVA (2 x 700 KVA, 1 x 460 KVA and 1 x 440 KVA), N+1 (UPS line) and 2.300 kVA (2 x 700 KVA, 1 x 460 KVA and 1 x 440 KVA), ̧N+1 (Service line)
    • Cooling Capacity – up to 4.0 kVA per rack (12,283 BTU/h)
    • Cooling Plant – total capacity of 755 TRs with CRAC equipment N+1. Temperature in the technical area is 24 ± 2°C
    • Cross Connects – Single Mode Fiber, Single Mode Fiber (50 micron), CAT6a
    • PTTMetro Exchange – 1GibE and 10GibE cross connects are available
    • Metro Connect – 1G and 10G connection are available. Currently, this Metro Connect covers IBXs in Brazil only


    Rio de Janeiro - RJ2



    • Electrical Capacity – up to 12,0 kVA per rack
    • UPS Configuration – Phase I: 2 systems of 1.6 MVA (1,44 MW), 2N; Phase II: 2 systems of 2 MVA (1,8 MW), block redundant
    • Utility Feeders – 2 lines (N+1): 25 kV
    • Utility Voltage – 208 / 120V
    • Power Transformers – Phase I: 2x 3 MVA, 2N (critical load) and 1,000 kVA (other loads). Phase II: 2x 3,5 MVA, Block redundant
    • Standby Power - Phase I: 5 MVA, 2N. Phase II: 6,25 MVA, Block Redundant
    • Cooling Capacity – up to 12.0 kVA per rack (36.709 BTU/h)
    • Cooling Plant – Direct expansion equipments (DX), total capacity of 600 tons of cooling in Phase I and additional 600 tons in Phase II, N+20%. Temperature in the technical area is 24 ± 2°C
    • Cross Connects – Single Mode Fiber, Single Mode Fiber (50 micron), CAT6a
    • PTTMetro Exchange – 1GibE and 10GibE cross connects are available
    • Metro Connect – 1G and 10G connection are available. Currently, this Metro Connect covers IBXs in Brazil only.

  9. #9
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,992

    Equinix São Paulo

    The only data center in Brazil with space for large-scale colocation (SP2 in Tamboré)

    More than 7,400 square meters (79,500 square feet) of colocation space




    Sao Paulo - SP1


    • Electrical Capacity – up to 4,0 kVA per rack
    • UPS Configuration – Bus A: 4 x 300 kVA (810kW), N+1; Bus B: 3 x 200 kVA (540 kW), N+1.
    • Utility Feeders – 2 lines (N+1): 34.5 kV
    • Power Transformers – 3 x 1,500 kVA / 1,800 kVA, N+1
    • Utility Voltage – 208 / 120V
    • Stand by Power – 2,940 kVA (3 x 440 kVA + 2 x 460 kVA + 1 x 700 kVA, N+1) and 1,000 kVA (2 x 500 kVA), N+1.
    • Cooling Capacity – up to 4.0 kVA per rack (12,283 BTU/h)
    • Cooling Plant – CRAC equipments, N+1. Temperature in the technical area is 24 ± 2°C
    • Cross Connects – Single Mode Fiber, Single Mode Fiber (50 micron), CAT6a
    • PTTMetro Exchange – 1GibE and 10GibE cross connects are available
    • Metro Connect – 1G and 10G connection are available. Currently, this Metro Connect covers IBXs in Brazil only.



    São Paulo - SP2


    • Electrical Capacity – up to 12,0 kVA per rack
    • UPS Configuration – 4 systems x 1.6 kVA (1,44 kW), and 2 systems x 2,000 kVA (1,840 kW), 2N.
    • Utility Feeders – 2 lines (N+1): 34.5 kV
    • Power Transformers – 2 x 4,5 kVA (scalable up to 9,000 kVA), N+1
    • Utility Voltage – 208 / 120V
    • Stand by Power – 6 systems x 2,800 kVA (4 x 700 kVA each), N+1.
    • Cooling Capacity – up to 12.0 kVA per rack (36,709 BTU/h)
    • Cooling Plant – Direct expansion equipments (DX), N+20%. Temperature in the technical area is 24 ± 2°C
    • Cross Connects – Single Mode Fiber, Single Mode Fiber (50 micron), CAT6a
    • PTTMetro Exchange – 1GibE and 10GibE cross connects are available
    • Metro Connect – 1G and 10G connection are available. Currently, this Metro Connect covers IBXs in Brazil only.

  10. #10
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,992
    UOL Diveo [Tamboré] expande data center em São Paulo

    Postado em: 17/01/2013

    À área de 17 mil metros quadrados foram adicionados 2,4 mil metros quadrados, o que amplia a capacidade de cada uma das novas salas para 300 racks de servidores. A estrutura atual comporta 18 mil servidores, que atendem os 3 mil clientes da empresa.

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