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  1. #1
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    [EN] iPhone ‘Error 53’

    ‘Error 53’ is the message that spells doom and will render your handset worthless if it’s been repaired by a third party.

    There is no warning and no fix.

    “The whole thing is extraordinary. How can a company deliberately make their own products useless with an upgrade and not warn their own customers about it?"



    Miles Brignall
    Friday 5 February 2016

    Thousands of iPhone 6 users claim they have been left holding almost worthless phones because Apple’s latest operating system permanently disables the handset if it detects that a repair has been carried out by a non-Apple technician.

    Relatively few people outside the tech world are aware of the so-called “error 53” problem, but if it happens to you you’ll know about it. And according to one specialist journalist, it “will kill your iPhone”.

    The issue appears to affect handsets where the home button, which has touch ID fingerprint recognition built-in, has been repaired by a “non-official” company or individual. It has also reportedly affected customers whose phone has been damaged but who have been able to carry on using it without the need for a repair.

    But the problem only comes to light when the latest version of Apple’s iPhone software, iOS 9, is installed. Indeed, the phone may have been working perfectly for weeks or months since a repair or being damaged.

    After installation a growing number of people have watched in horror as their phone, which may well have cost them £500-plus, is rendered useless. Any photos or other data held on the handset is lost – and irretrievable.

    Tech experts claim Apple knows all about the problem but has done nothing to warn users that their phone will be “bricked” (ie, rendered as technologically useful as a brick) if they install the iOS upgrade.

    Freelance photographer and self-confessed Apple addict Antonio Olmos says this happened to his phone a few weeks ago after he upgraded his software. Olmos had previously had his handset repaired while on an assignment for the Guardian in Macedonia. “I was in the Balkans covering the refugee crisis in September when I dropped my phone. Because I desperately needed it for work I got it fixed at a local shop, as there are no Apple stores in Macedonia. They repaired the screen and home button, and it worked perfectly.”

    He says he thought no more about it, until he was sent the standard notification by Apple inviting him to install the latest software. He accepted the upgrade, but within seconds the phone was displaying “error 53” and was, in effect, dead.

    When Olmos, who says he has spent thousands of pounds on Apple products over the years, took it to an Apple store in London, staff told him there was nothing they could do, and that his phone was now junk. He had to pay £270 for a replacement and is furious.

    “The whole thing is extraordinary. How can a company deliberately make their own products useless with an upgrade and not warn their own customers about it? Outside of the big industrialised nations, Apple stores are few and far between, and damaged phones can only be brought back to life by small third-party repairers.

    “I am not even sure these third-party outfits even know this is a potential problem,” he says.

    Olmos is far from the only one affected. If you Google “iPhone 6” and “error 53” you will find no shortage of people reporting that they have been left with a phone that now only functions as a very expensive paperweight.

    Posting a message on an Apple Support Communities forum on 31 December, “Arjunthebuster” is typical. He/she says they bought their iPhone 6 in January 2015 in Dubai, and dropped it the following month causing a small amount of damage.

    They carried on using the phone, but when they tried to install iOS 9 in November “error 53” popped up. “The error hasn’t occurred because I broke my phone (it was working fine for 10 months). I lost all my data because of this error. I don’t want Apple to fix my screen or anything! I just want them to fix the ‘error 53’ so I can use my phone, but they won’t!”

    Could Apple’s move, which appears to be designed to squeeze out independent repairers, contravene competition rules? Car manufacturers, for example, are not allowed to insist that buyers only get their car serviced by them.

    Apple charges £236 for a repair to the home button on an iPhone 6 in the UK, while an independent repairer would demand a fraction of that.

    California-based tech expert Kyle Wiens, who runs the iFixit website, says this is a major issue. “The ‘error 53’ page on our website has had more than 183,000 hits, suggesting this is a big problem for Apple users,” he told Guardian Money. “The problem occurs if the repairer changes the home button or the cable. Following the software upgrade the phone in effect checks to make sure it is still using the original components, and if it isn’t, it simply locks out the phone. There is no warning, and there’s no way that I know of to bring it back to life.”

    He says it is unclear whether this is a deliberate move to force anyone who drops their phone to use Apple for a repair. “All along, Apple’s view is that it does not want third parties carrying out repairs to its products, and this looks like an obvious extension of that,” he says. “What it should do is allow its customers to recalibrate their phone after a repair. Only when there is a huge outcry about this problem will it do something.”

    The Daily Dot website features an article by tech writer Mike Wehner headlined “Error 53 will kill your iPhone and no one knows what it is”. He relates how his own iPhone 6 Plus was left “effectively dead to the world”.

    Meanwhile, an article by tech writer Reuben Esparza, published in November by iCracked, a phone repair service, states: “When pressed for more information about the error, few, if any Apple employees could offer an explanation. There was no part they would replace, no software fix, and no way to access the phone’s memory. The fix was a new iPhone.” It continues: “Though still largely a mystery to most, we now know that error 53 is the result of a hardware failure somewhere within the home button assembly.”

    A spokeswoman for Apple told Money (get ready for a jargon overload): “We protect fingerprint data using a secure enclave, which is uniquely paired to the touch ID sensor. When iPhone is serviced by an authorised Apple service provider or Apple retail store for changes that affect the touch ID sensor, the pairing is re-validated. This check ensures the device and the iOS features related to touch ID remain secure. Without this unique pairing, a malicious touch ID sensor could be substituted, thereby gaining access to the secure enclave. When iOS detects that the pairing fails, touch ID, including Apple Pay, is disabled so the device remains secure.”

    She adds: “When an iPhone is serviced by an unauthorised repair provider, faulty screens or other invalid components that affect the touch ID sensor could cause the check to fail if the pairing cannot be validated. With a subsequent update or restore, additional security checks result in an ‘error 53’ being displayed … If a customer encounters an unrecoverable error 53, we recommend contacting Apple support.”


    http://www.theguardian.com/money/201...d-party-repair
    Última edição por 5ms; 06-02-2016 às 13:30.

  2. #2
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    Apple says iPhone 'Error 53' is to protect customer

    Security measure is necessary to prevent use of fraudulent parts, says company, after thousands of users affected.

    Chris Johnston
    Saturday 6 February 2016

    Apple has hit back at criticism of its controversial “Error 53” message on iPhones, claiming it is part of measures to protect customers’ security.

    On Friday, the Guardian revealed how thousands of iPhone 6 users have had their devices, which cost hundreds of pounds, left useless after encountering the error message.

    The problem is related to the smartphone’s home button, which contains a Touch ID thumbprint reader that can be used to unlock the device rather than inputting a four-digit security code.

    If the phone is damaged and a non-Apple repairer replaces the button, a subsequent update of the operating system detects a non-standard component and shuts down the device. There is no known way of bringing it back to life.

    Many iPhone 6 owners have only become aware of the issue when installing routine updates to iOS, Apple’s operating system for iPhones and iPads. It is unclear exactly how many have been affected.

    In a statement released following the publication of the Guardian’s story, an Apple spokesperson said: “We take customer security very seriously and Error 53 is the result of security checks designed to protect our customers. iOS checks that the Touch ID sensor in your iPhone or iPad correctly matches your device’s other components.

    “If iOS finds a mismatch, the check fails and Touch ID, including for Apple Pay use, is disabled. This security measure is necessary to protect your device and prevent a fraudulent Touch ID sensor from being used. If a customer encounters Error 53, we encourage them to contact Apple Support.”

    However, some users have also encountered Error 53 messages even though their device has not been altered or repaired in any way. That is what happened to US technology writer Mike Wehner last year when his iPhone 6 suffered intermittent problems with the Touch ID sensor.

    Although he was able to get a replacement device at an Apple store, thousands of users whose phones have been repaired have not been so lucky. As third-party hardware has been installed on their devices, Apple deems its terms and conditions to have been broken and forced many owners to contribute towards the cost of a new phone.

    With many Apple customers left furious at the company’s stance, one Guardian reader comments: “I think they made an after-the-fact adjustment to a poorly conceived and implemented security system on the iPhone. They hadn’t properly considered the implications of third parties substituting parts on the phones, whether these were bonafide alterations or not.

    “They didn’t think about the customers at all (Apple are arrogant enough to do this). Or they decided that it isn’t their problem if customers do something other than what they recommend. Surely even Apple now realise it is their problem? They will have to sort it out.”

    A reader of the Boing Boing technology blog said Apple should have advertised the fact rather than keeping it hidden.

    "If they included a warning in the package ‘tamper resistance’ feature that works by non-Apple-authorised repair services may be mistaken for tampering attempts, and lead to the phone being disabled’, then it would be purely a feature ... By concealing the feature prior to sales, and only even revealing it after being repeatedly pressured over it, Apple turned what could have been a feature into a landmine.”

    Apple shares have fallen more than 20% in the past three months as investors begin to doubt whether it can maintain the stellar growth posted since the iPhone first went on sale eight years ago. The company relies on the smartphone for about two thirds of its revenue.

    Last month Apple said iPhone sales were flat for the three months to December, with about 74.8m devices bought in the quarter. Its most recent device, the Apple watch, has failed to capture consumers’ imagination and iPad sales are also on the slide.

    Much is therefore riding on the success of the iPhone 7, expected to be released in September, but slowing global smartphone sales could make that a difficult feat to pull off even for Apple.


    http://www.theguardian.com/technolog...omers-security

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    "Apple knows all about the problem but has done nothing to warn users that their phone will be bricked”

    “When pressed for more information about the error, few, if any Apple employees could offer an explanation. There was no part they would replace, no software fix, and no way to access the phone’s memory. The fix was a new iPhone.”

    A Apple conhece bem os clientes que tem.
    Última edição por 5ms; 06-02-2016 às 16:23.

  4. #4
    Moderador
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    Oct 2010
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    É tipo mandar consertar seu Rolls Royce no mecânico da esquina...

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Citação Postado originalmente por cresci Ver Post
    É tipo mandar consertar seu Rolls Royce no mecânico da esquina...
    Concordo, e por isso mesmo o Guardian teve o cuidado de dramatizar a matéria:

    Freelance photographer and self-confessed Apple addict Antonio Olmos says this happened to his phone a few weeks ago after he upgraded his software.

    Olmos had previously had his handset repaired while on an assignment for the Guardian in Macedonia. “I was in the Balkans covering the refugee crisis in September when I dropped my phone. Because I desperately needed it for work I got it fixed at a local shop, as there are no Apple stores in Macedonia. They repaired the screen and home button, and it worked perfectly.”

    He says he thought no more about it, until he was sent the standard notification by Apple inviting him to install the latest software. He accepted the upgrade, but within seconds the phone was displaying “error 53” and was, in effect, dead.

    When Olmos, who says he has spent thousands of pounds on Apple products over the years, took it to an Apple store in London, staff told him there was nothing they could do, and that his phone was now junk. He had to pay £270 for a replacement and is furious.

    “The whole thing is extraordinary. How can a company deliberately make their own products useless with an upgrade and not warn their own customers about it? Outside of the big industrialised nations, Apple stores are few and far between, and damaged phones can only be brought back to life by small third-party repairers.



    O ponto aqui é que consumidores e a imprensa são extraordinariamente tolerantes em relação à algumas marcas e irrasciveis em relação à outras. Por exemplo, alguma dúvida que a mesma situação com um produto da Microsoft geraria matérias raivosas com grande evidência no noticiário mundial?

    Para mim, o comentário do leitor do Boing Boing resume "the real thing":

    "If they [Apple] included a warning in the package ‘tamper resistance’ feature that works by non-Apple-authorised repair services may be mistaken for tampering attempts, and lead to the phone being disabled’, then it would be purely a feature ... By concealing the feature prior to sales, and only even revealing it after being repeatedly pressured over it, Apple turned what could have been a feature into a landmine.”

    Note-se que antes do upgrade a tal segurança era inexistente.

    Após o upgrade, foi como ter perda total após reparar o pneu do seu Rolls Royce no borracheiro da beira da estradinha. Pior. Além de bloqueado sem reversão, foi perdido tudo o que estava armazenado no telefone: contatos, fotos, etc.
    Última edição por 5ms; 07-02-2016 às 07:16.

  6. #6
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Peter Herdman-Grant ‏@DBAStorage 2 hours ago

    An internal 128GB iPhone storage upgrade? Only at the Shenzhen market…
    [Video] http://ow.ly/3b0xIs




  7. #7
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Nov 2010
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    1,608
    Isso sim que é fidelizar clientes hehehehe

    Já faz alguns meses que eu tinha chegado a conclusão que nunca mais compraria produtos da apple, depois desse erro ai, acho que está mais claro que eles estão escravizando seus clientes...
    oGigante.com*• Revenda de Hospedagem Cloud Linux + WHMCS Grátis
    VWhost.com.br • Revenda de Hospedagem Linux Cpanel + CloudFlare
    Zocka.com.br • Hospedagem de Sites Cpanel + Construtor de Sites

  8. #8
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    Citação Postado originalmente por chuvadenovembro Ver Post
    Isso sim que é fidelizar clientes hehehehe
    breizh2008 ‏@breizh2008 5 hours ago

    Kim Jong-un: Tyrant, Psychopath... and Mac User



  9. #9
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Australian watchdog to investigate Apple over iPhone 'error 53'

    Australian Competition and Consumer Commission will demand Apple explain message that disables handset if it detects repairs by non-Apple technicians

    Paul Karp
    Friday 12 February 2016

    The competition watchdog says it will ask Apple to urgently explain an error message disabling iPhone users’ handsets and is considering whether it breaches Australian consumer law.

    Last week the Guardian revealed thousands of iPhone 6 users have received “error 53”, which permanently disables the handset if it detects that a repair has been carried out by a non-Apple technician.

    An Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) spokesman told Guardian Australia it would write to Apple urgently seeking a response to consumers’ concerns that their phones had stopped working.

    “We are currently considering whether the reports are likely to raise concerns under the Competition and Consumer Act,” the ACCC said.

    “In particular the ACCC is examining whether this practice contravenes the consumer guarantee and false and misleading representations provisions of the Australian consumer law. The ACCC would also be concerned about any practices which restricts competition, including through access to parts or data.”

    The problem is related to the smartphone’s home button, which contains a Touch ID thumbprint reader that can be used to unlock the device rather than inputting a four-digit security code.

    If the phone is damaged and a non-Apple repairer replaces the button, a subsequent update of the operating system detects a non-standard component and shuts down the device. There is no known way of bringing it back to life.

    Apple has responded by claiming the message is part of measures to protect customers’ security “to protect [a user’s] device and prevent a fraudulent Touch ID sensor from being used”.

    Many iPhone 6 owners have only become aware of the issue when installing routine updates to iOS, Apple’s operating system for iPhones and iPads. It is unclear exactly how many have been affected.

    Apple recommends users who attempt to restore their device and still see “error 53” to contact Apple Support.

    Guardian Australia has contacted Apple for comment.
    http://www.theguardian.com/technolog...3-breaches-law

  10. #10
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Apple apologises over Error 53 and issues fix for bricked iPhones

    Move comes after class action lawsuit over ‘security feature’ that left iPhones inoperable after they had home buttons replaced by non-Apple repairers.

    Now the company says the issue was a “factory test” not intended to affect customers.


    Jonathan Haynes
    Friday 19 February 2016

    Apple has released a fix for users affected by “Error 53”, a software issue that rendered useless iPhones that had had their home buttons replaced by third parties.

    The problem was related to Apple’s Touch ID fingerprint reader, which is part of the home button and can be used to unlock the device instead of inputting a passcode.

    If a non-Apple repairer replaced the button on a damaged iPhone or iPad, a subsequent update of the operating system detected a non-standard component and shut down the device. There was no way to restart it.

    Earlier this month the Guardian highlighted the fury of thousands of users who had their damaged phones repaired only to find their devices were later unexpectedly “bricked” when updating the operating system.

    At the time Apple said that Error 53 was a security feature to protect customers. It said: “This security measure is necessary to protect your device and prevent a fraudulent Touch ID sensor from being used. If a customer encounters Error 53, we encourage them to contact Apple Support.”

    However, now the company says the issue was a “factory test”. Issuing a fix with an updated version of its operating system iOS 9.2.1, Apple told the tech site TechCrunch that it apologised for any inconvenience to customers. It added: “This was designed to be a factory test and was not intended to affect customers. Customers who paid for an out-of-warranty replacement of their device based on this issue should contact AppleCare about a reimbursement.”

    The turnaround comes after widespread publicity and the Californian tech giant being served with a class action lawsuit over in the US and attention from a competition watchdog in Australia.

    The fix will let users with disabled iPhones clear the error by connecting them to iTunes and installing the updated iOS. The update can not be applied directly to the phone via the cloud – although iPhones updated in that way were unaffected.

    Solving Error 53 does not re-enable Touch ID, as a third-party replacement of the home button could potentially allow unauthorised access to a locked phone by modifying the fingerprint sensor.
    http://www.theguardian.com/technolog...ricked-iphones

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