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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,051

    [EN] Supermicro: Blades e Power8

    http://www.nextplatform.com/2016/09/...es-supermicro/

    Surfing On Tech Waves With Supermicro

    Timothy Prickett Morgan
    September 12, 2016


    ...

    Forecasting sales and trying to close them are two of the many challenges that all server, storage, and switching vendors face, and Supermicro, which straddles the line between the tier one OEMs and the world’s largest ODMs, is no different. The company enjoys the boom times, like when a new generation of Intel Xeon processors hits the market when it is most hungry for more performance or some new feature. The “Broadwell” Xeon E5 bump and the rise of hyperscalers has been good for Supermicro, which broker through $2 billion in annual sales for the first time in its history during its fiscal 2016 year, which ended in June.

    ...


    As we reported last week, Supermicro is manufacturing two Power8-based systems aimed at volume server buyers on behalf of IBM, and we are dying to know if it will sell these machines directly to end user customers.

    ...

    Even without Skylake Xeons being in the field, Liang says that two technologies are driving Supermicro’s compute and storage server businesses higher. The first is, oddly enough, the blade server form factor. Yes, blades have been around since the late 1990s, and yes, the market did not embrace them to the level that many had anticipated. But thanks to steady engineering progress and cutting manufacturing costs, Liang says that Supermicro’s two blade lines *– the MicroBlade hyperscale systems and the SuperBlade modular designs – are growing very fast.
    Liang puts some numbers on this trend, which runs counter to the conventional wisdom that blades are becoming a thing of the past and that rack servers still reign supreme. In the last five years, depending on the year, the MicroBlade and SuperBlade systems comprised somewhere between 3 percent and 4 percent of shipments, Liang estimates. And as the fiscal 2016 year came to an end in June, blade servers represented about 10 percent of shipments, and Liang thinks that blades could represent 20 percent or maybe even more share of the company’s shipments next fiscal year. The SuperBlade business is doubling every year now, and the MicroBlade business is growing by 3X to 4X, depending on the quarter. So Supermicro is clearly on to something.

    ...



  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    15,051
    Breve na Digital Ocean?

    ...

    IBM has been hinting that motherboard and whitebox server maker Supermicro has been working on two Power-based machines through the OpenPower Foundation, and two machines, code-named “Briggs” and “Stratton” after the two-cycle engines a lot of us know from lawn mowers and go carts in our youth, are the first machines that Supermicro is building on behalf of IBM. (This is significant because Supermicro is the supplier of systems for IBM’s SoftLayer public cloud, and Big Blue wants to add Power compute alongside of Xeon compute on that cloud.)

    ...

    The Briggs machine uses a Supermicro motherboard, and uses a normal Power8 merchant chip and does not support NVLink ports. The system offers the same processor options – eight cores running at 3.32 GHz and ten cores running at 2.92 GHz and burning around 190 watts for both – and puts two processors in a 2U form factor. The machine has a maximum capacity of 512 GB across 16 DDR4 memory sticks, and memory bandwidth per socket is cut in half with 57.5 GB/sec of bandwidth into L4 cache from the chip and 85 GB/sec per socket going from L4 cache to DDR4 main memory. Briggs has has a maximum of 96 TB of disk storage in a dozen 3.5-inch drive bays. The system has five PCI-Express slots, with four of them CAPI-enabled, and can have two Nvidia Tesla K80 coprocessors installed. (You could install a Pascal Tesla GPU card if you want, obviously, since they come in PCI-Express versions, too. But they are harder to come by, we hear, than the SMX2 versions.)

    The Briggs Power System is available starting today and has a base price of $5,999 with a configured system with two ten-core processors and 128 GB running about $11,500, according to Boday.

    The Stratton machine is a lot skinnier, and uses a geared-down 130 watt Power8 part to pack more cores into a smaller space.

    The Power S821LC is, as the name suggests, a scale-out Power8 machine with two sockets that comes in a 1U form factor. This machine uses an eight-core Power8 chip that runs at 2.32 GHz or a ten-core Power8 chip that spins at 2.09 GHz; both fits in a 130 watt power envelope. The Stratton machine has four 3.5-inch SATA slots and supports up to 512 GB of memory across 16 memory sticks implemented on four memory risers, and has half the memory bandwidth into L4 cache and DDR4 memory as the Minsky machine just like Briggs. Stratton has four PCI-Express 3.0 slots, three x16 and one x8, with the x16 slots being CAPI-enabled, and has room for one Tesla K80 GPU as a coprocessor option

    Boday says that the base Power S821LC price is around $5,900, with a configured system (two processors and 128 GB of memory) costing around $10,500.

    All three of the new Power Systems LC machines run Canonical Ubuntu Server 16.04, which is the current release, and will be able to run Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 in the fourth quarter. No word on when SUSE Linux Enterprise Server will be supported on these machines, but it is looking increasingly unlikely unless a lot of customer clamor for it.

    ...
    http://www.nextplatform.com/2016/09/...ms-add-nvlink/

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