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  1. #1
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    [EN] LiquidSky: high performing gaming computer in the sky


    Own a PC in the cloud to run any app or game

    Harold Stark
    11/05/2016

    ...

    The idea is simple. Instead of being forced to upgrade their gaming gear every couple years, gamers will simply purchase a monthly subscription to LiquidSky. This will give them access to a high-end cloud server that carries enough juice to run the most performance-intensive of games at a steady framerate. By broadcasting to a humble display that can either be a low-end desktop or an Android TV, users will be able to enjoy the full capabilities of the Windows 8-based operating system installed into your personal account, known simply as a Sky Computer. Thus, you will easily find yourself playing intense desktop titles such as Witcher 3 and Call of Duty on your humble Android or Windows device, all without the slightest loss in frames per second. All you’ll be needing is a stable internet connection of around 8 mbps or higher.

    The idea is brilliant, but how well is it executed, really? I thought I’d give it a try and see for myself. The first thing I noticed on firing up my Sky Computer is that I have access to two cloud-based operating systems. The Steam OS, meant specifically to play performance-intensive video games on Steam; and of course, Windows 8, which allows me to do a whole lot more than just playing games, including browsing the web, typing documents, creating presentations, photoshopping and pretty much everything else you can imagine yourself doing on a Windows PC. The platform supports every single piece of software or video game that you can imagine running on your usual Windows desktop, including platforms such as Steam, Battle.net, Green Man Gaming and the original Windows Store. The Sky Computer integrates well with your usual mouse and keyboard, though a wired USB controller is recommended for when playing games. They say that Bluetooth devices don’t integrate well with LiquidSky, though I personally did not encounter any issues using my wireless DualShock controller with the LiquidSky App on my Android TV.

    Unlike other cloud gaming services, you still have to download the games to your Sky Storage before you start playing, though downloading is considerably faster at the native 1 gbps connection utilized by LiquidSky servers. The highest resolution currently available on your SkyComputer is 1080p, which is understandably a bummer for us 4K gamers. However, the platform does support gameplay at 60 FPS, which is the hallmark for a great gaming experience in 2016. Besides supporting Android and Windows devices, LiquidSky is also compatible with Mac and Linux, so no more missing out on great Windows titles because you own an Apple computer. What’s more, the LiquidSky team also promises to upscale its hardware as games get more and more demanding in the future.

    For a project that ambitious, the real bummer was, quite expectedly, the pricing plan. Your access to the SkyComputer is dependent on the number Sky Credits you own. Each hour you spend on your Sky Computer is worth one or two credits depending on the hardware you prefer, with each Sky Credit being priced at $0.50. Investing on the $14.99/month Gamer Plan will set you up with 80 credits a month, while investing on the expensive unlimited plan at $39.99/month buys you unlimited access to your Sky Computer. Add to this the fact that you have to actually purchase each and every game you play on your Sky Computer separately via Steam or the Windows Store. Needless to say, this doesn’t exactly help mitigate the expenses that we are so trying to prevent under the cloud computing system, but at least someone made a start. We can only hope that, with time, the team gets lenient with the pricing system and offers plans that are more reasonable to the common population.

    My verdict? LiquidSky’s innovative idea is off to a promising start. So far, they seem to have done a decent job in coming up with a unique plan and implementing it well. However, given that the primary reason for anyone to consider such a service would be to reduce on the expenses of performing hardware upgrades every year, they really need to rethink their pricing plan to make it more reasonable for consumers to opt for. A few minor things, such as Bluetooth support, 4K technology, server count and occasional latency issues could also use some improvement. The system is supposed to leave beta in the upcoming months, and I am anxious to see whether the team uses public feedback to turn this into something beautiful.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/harold..._12812368.html


    Experience LiquidSky for Free
    We know you'll love gaming on LiquidSky and that's why we want you to try it for free.
    Experience high performance gaming on any device in the cloud!
    Request Beta Access

  2. #2
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    http://liquidsky.tv/en/data-centers




    Sydney, Australia
    São Paulo, Brazil
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Washington, DC
    London, England
    San Jose, CA
    Dallas, TX
    Tokyo, Japan
    Milan, Italy
    Hong Kong, China
    Chennai, India
    Querétaro, Mexico
    Seoul, South Korea

    Seattle, Washington
    Houston, TX
    Toronto, Canada
    Montreal, Canada
    Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Paris, France
    Singapore
    Última edição por 5ms; 06-11-2016 às 07:01.

  3. #3
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    Chennai, India

    "Custom built servers from IBM with the best processors plus Nvidia graphics cards"

  4. #4
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    SkyScraper - LiquidSky for Business

    There are many solutions out there to help virtualize your workforce and reduce costs, but none quite like SkyScraper. Our supercomputers stream even the most demanding of applications to all of your employee or student devices.They also dynamically change the resources allocated every millisecond, ensuring your resource management is efficient and cost effective.

    Cost

    Pay only for the resources your organization needs, only when they’re needed. No more investing on desktops that are powered down all night collecting dust, or wondering what to do with an ex-employee’s computer. No more buying an expensive hardware for a single project.

    Security

    Users are isolated from each other in their own clouds. Admins have end-to-end control of preinstalled applications along with employee permissions. We use enterprise-level firewalls and security software, giving your business the protection of an intelligence agency. Dedicated and isolated server racks are also available.

    Power

    Do everything from simple word processing to extreme game and graphic design, only paying for what you need, when you need it.

    Accessibility

    Users can connect with whatever device they currently own, or can be given a complimentary SkyPen which plugs into any HDMI monitor (comes free with a Skyscraper subscription).

    No Interruptions

    LiquidSky Technology means you don't need to ever worry about restarting or upgrading an user’s machine. Our hardware adapts instantly to meet user programming demands.

    Control

    Create workgroups of employees to set control points. Control everything from allowable user devices to the amount of time spent using an application. Set maximum and minimum amounts of accessible hardware. If a user has a need for a burst of extra power, you are never charged more than the set maximum.

    Speed

    With our Sky-Accelerated Web Browsing and advanced compression, you can access affordable internet bandwidth. Tap into the Sky’s supercomputing 10gb/s.

    Maintenance / Setup

    While you can still use an administrator to take control of your system, our system is easy to use and automated.



    Apply for the SkyScraper test drive (Fall 2016)

    https://liquidsky.tv/en/skyscraper

  5. #5
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    Cloud gaming firm LiquidSky raises $4M from Samsung

    Dean Takahashi
    September 27, 2016

    Cloud gaming startup LiquidSky has raised $4 million in funding from Samsung Next Ventures, Sun Microsystems cofounder Scott McNealy, and former AOL Time Warner executive Bill Raduchel.

    Cloud gaming suffered a big decline when OnLive crashed in 2012, and shut down in 2015. But LiquidSky has amassed more than 500,000 users through viral word-of-mouth marketing.

    The service lets you play a high-end game on a low-end computer or mobile device. Like other cloud game services, it runs the game in the cloud and streams a video of the game to the user. When the user does something interactive, a small amount of data goes back up to the server. But founder Ian McLoughlin, a 23-year-old who started working on the problem when he was in high school, explained in an earlier interview that his company’s approach is a lot smarter than previous versions, costs less to deploy, and provides for an infinite catalog of games to stream.

    “We are thrilled to have secured the confidence and financial backing of Samsung Next Ventures, as well as technology pioneers Scott McNealy and Bill Raduchel,” said McLoughlin, in a statement issued today. “Beyond their financial support that will help us scale and grow our infrastructure, their industry know*how is invaluable in helping LiquidSky remain at the bleeding edge of cloud computing.”

    Sony has launched its PlayStation Now cloud gaming service so you can play older games on the PlayStation 4, but that service has its own limitations, such as a lack of games. By contrast, LiquidSky says that you can play any PC game on its service, which is dubbed desktop-as-a-service. The LiquidSky service works on Windows, PC, Linux, Mac, and Android.

    It may be hard to believe, but the young McLoughlin came up with a streaming protocol that is more efficient at handling cloud gaming. It was so interesting that Scott McNealy, former CEO of Sun Microsystems, funded the project and even convinced McLoughlin to drop out of school to do the startup. Now McNealy, Raduchel, and Samsung have stepped up to lead the round of investment.

    In the past, McLoughlin said that previous services suffered from high latency (long delays between interactions) and high costs. Scaling up to support lots of users was expensive, as it required a graphics card in every server to support a single user when OnLive was debuting its service. Now, a single Nvidia graphics card can support 128 users on a cloud service.

    And while OnLive had to cut licensing deals with publishers one-by-one, LiquidSky has an unlimited number of PC games that it can run, since it doesn’t require developers or publishers to modify the code in any way, McLaughlin said.

    LiquidSky explains its service by telling customers that they can access their very own cloud*-based “SkyComputer,” *a dedicated high*-end Windows gaming PC with up to a terabyte of online storage. This SkyComputer is in the cloud, not in the user’s home. And you can access it from anywhere on any device. For non-gamers, the attraction would be a “desktop-as-a-service.”

    Samsung sees promise in offering Windows PC games and other apps on mobile devices.

    “LiquidSky has the potential to open up an entirely new phase of the cloud — true real*time, low*latency computing,” said Gus Warren, managing director of Samsung Next Ventures, in a statement. “This could present significant opportunities for our business units, and we’re thrilled to support Ian and his team as they officially launch the platform.”

    LiquidSky customers may play any PC game or high-*performance by “downloading” it to the SkyComputer. They can choose games from distribution portals like Steam, BattleNet, Uplay, and Origin. LiquidSky also doesn’t have to buy or build its own custom servers. In a deal with IBM, LiquidSky can access new servers on demand as the traffic requires.

    Each user needs about three megabits per second to 12 megabits per second bandwidth. In the U.S., that’s not so hard to do, and in many countries, even mobile networks can handle that.

    LiquidSky says it can offer low-latency streams with resolutions up to 1080p at 60 frames per second. LiquidSky also supports all major USB controllers, including Microsoft’s Xbox PC controllers, webcams, USB storage devices and microphones, delivering a smooth desktop-*like gaming experience through cloud technology.

    McLoughlin came up with the idea as he searched for a good cloud-gaming service. He was soon joined by Wayin founder Scott Johnston. Together, they recruited McNealy and Bill Raduchel, who became LiquidSky’s chairman. McLoughlin’s company has been around, operating in stealth, for more than three years.

    LiquidSky has a couple of ways to pay. Customers can buy access on a pay-as-you-go plan for as little as 50 cents a SkyCredit, for about one hour of play, with a 10-credit minimum purchase. The company also has a subscription fee of $15 a month for 500 gigabytes of storage and 80 hours of play, or $40 a month for 1 terabyte of storage and unlimited time to play.

    LiquidSky is still in closed-beta testing. The company will demo the technology at TwitchCon 2016 in San Diego, Calif.

    http://venturebeat.com/2016/09/27/cl...bill-raduchel/

  6. #6
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    LiquidSky is ready to show off its modern take on OnLive’s failed cloud gaming

    Dean Takahashi
    August 17, 2016

    Cloud gaming took a big dive when ambitious startup OnLive hit the wall in 2012 and finally shut down altogether in 2015. But stealth startup LiquidSky is formally unveiling its cloud gaming service today — and it says it already has 400,000 users.

    The service lets you play a high-end game on a low-end computer or mobile device. Like other cloud game services, it runs the game in the cloud and streams a video of the game to the user. When the user does something interactive, a small amount of data goes back up to the server. But founder Ian McLoughlin, a 23-year-old who started working on the problem when he was in high school, said his company’s approach is a lot smarter than previous versions, costs less to deploy, and provides for an infinite catalog of games to stream.

    Sony has launched its PlayStation Now cloud gaming service so you can play older games on the PlayStation 4, but that service has its own limitations, such as a lack of games. By contrast, LiquidSky says that you can play any PC game on its service, which is dubbed desktop-as-a-service. The LiquidSky service works on Windows, PC, Linux, Mac, and Android.

    It may be hard to believe, but the young McLoughlin came up with a streaming protocol that is more efficient at handling cloud gaming. It was so interesting that Scott McNealy, former CEO of Sun Microsystems, funded the project and even convinced McLoughlin to drop out of school to do the startup. It almost sounds like Richard Hendricks’ fictional Pied Piper company in the HBO comedy Silicon Valley. And that isn’t lost on McLoughlin.

    “Just as Richard Hendricks was going around Sand Hill Road to raise money, we were going around as well,” McLoughlin said.

    In the past, McLoughlin said that previous services suffered from high latency (long delays between interactions) and high costs. Scaling up to support lots of users was expensive, as it required a graphics card in every server to support a single user when OnLive was debuting its service. Now, a single Nvidia graphics card can support 128 users on a cloud service.

    And while OnLive had to cut licensing deals with publishers one-by-one, LiquidSky has an unlimited number of PC games that it can run, since it doesn’t require developers or publishers to modify the code in any way, McLaughlin said.

    “We knew we had to find a way to become a bridge to existing content, rather than host our own content,” McLoughlin said. “We created a system that lets you run any existing Windows game, at Windows 7 and after.”

    LiquidSky explains its service by telling customers that they can access their very own cloud*-based “SkyComputer,” *a dedicated high*-end Windows gaming PC with up to a terabyte of online storage. This SkyComputer is in the cloud, not in the user’s home. And you can access it from anywhere on any device.

    LiquidSky customers may play any PC game or high-*performance by “downloading” it to the SkyComputer. They can choose games from distribution portals like Steam, BattleNet, Uplay, and Origin. LiquidSky also doesn’t have to buy or build its own custom servers. In a deal with IBM, LiquidSky can access new servers on demand as the traffic requires.

    Each user needs about three megabits per second to 12 megabits per second bandwidth. In the U.S., that’s not so hard to do, and in many countries, even mobile networks can handle that.

    “In terms of bandwidth, it uses no more than Netflix,” McLoughlin said. “This is a problem that got solved in the past couple of years. OnLive was too early. On our network, StarCraft II downloads in 60 seconds.”

    LiquidSky says it can offer low-latency streams with resolutions up to 1080p at 60 frames per second. LiquidSky also supports all major USB controllers, including Microsoft’s Xbox PC controllers, webcams, USB storage devices and microphones, delivering a smooth desktop-*like gaming experience through cloud technology.

    McLoughlin came up with the idea as he searched for a good cloud-gaming service. He was soon joined by Wayin founder Scott Johnston. Together, they recruited McNealy and Bill Raduchel, who became LiquidSky’s chairman. McLoughlin’s company has been around, operating in stealth, for more than three years.

    “I’m thrilled to be able to offer my experience, relationships, and financial backing to a company as exciting as LiquidSky,” added McNealy, who is an advisor to LiquidSky, in a statement. “While the company is currently focused first* and* foremost on the fast*-paced interactive entertainment field, the positive potential of LiquidSky’s technology for business applications and the educational field is equally staggering.”

    LiquidSky has a couple of ways to pay. Customers can buy access on a pay-as-you-go plan for as little as 50 cents a SkyCredit, for about one hour of play, with a 10-credit minimum purchase. The company also has a subscription fee of $15 a month for 500 gigabytes of storage and 80 hours of play, or $40 a month for 1 terabyte of storage and unlimited time to play.

    So far, the game service hasn’t been advertised, but it has spread by word of mouth and grown to 400,000 beta users. That’s pretty big. The company has 15 employees and it is in the midst of raising another round of funding.

    http://venturebeat.com/2016/08/17/li...nized-service/

  7. #7
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    PR: High-Performance Cloud Gaming Platform LiquidSky Raises (US) $4 Million

    Samsung Global Innovation Center, Sun Microsystems Founder McNealy, and Former AOL-Time Warner Executive Raduchel Invest in Desktop-as-a-Service (DAAS) Startup

    NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - September 27, 2016) - LiquidSky -- a revolutionary high-performance cloud-based gaming, processing, and remote desktop service -- is pleased to announce today the successful closing of (US) $4 million in a series of seed rounds, led by Samsung Global Innovation Center, Sun Microsystems founder Scott McNealy, and former Sun Microsystems and AOL-Time Warner executive Bill Raduchel. Both McNealy and Raduchel serve as LiquidSky's strategic advisors, with Raduchel also the company's Chairman of the Board. Presently in closed beta, LiquidSky has already attracted over half a million users to its revolutionary Desktop-as-a-Service (DaaS) platform.

    "We are thrilled to have secured the confidence and financial backing of Samsung Global Innovation Center, as well as technology pioneers Scott McNealy and Bill Raduchel," said Ian McLoughlin, LiquidSky CEO. "Beyond their financial support that will help us scale and grow our infrastructure, their industry know-how is invaluable in helping LiquidSky remain at the bleeding edge of cloud computing."

    "LiquidSky has the potential to open up an entirely new phase of the cloud -- true real-time, low-latency computing," added Gus Warren, Managing Director of Investments at Samsung Global Innovation Center. "This could present significant opportunities for our business units, and we're thrilled to support Ian and his team as they officially launch the platform."

    LiquidSky uniquely solves the four biggest issues that have plagued other cloud-based gaming services: high latency, high cost, limited scalability, and a finite catalog of supported games. Gamers can play any PC title nearly anywhere, anytime on Android, Mac, Linux or even low-spec Windows PC devices via their very own cloud-based "SkyComputer" -- a dedicated high-spec Windows gaming PC with up to a terabyte of online storage. LiquidSky customers may download and play any PC game or high-performance application they choose from any leading digital distribution portal, including Steam, BattleNet, Uplay, Origin, and many others. If a game or application runs on Windows, LiquidSky supports it!

    Customers purchase LiquidSky access via a pay-as-you-go plan for as little as $0.50 a "SkyCredit" (typically an hour of play) with a ten SkyCredit purchase minimum. The more comprehensive "Gamer" and "Unlimited" subscription plans currently cost $14.99 or $39.99 a month and offer 500GB or 1TB storage, respectively.

    A full press kit with images, trailers, logos and photos of the executive team is available here: http://bit.ly/2ahGFa3.

    To speak with LiquidSky's executive or advisory team, a representative of Samsung Global Innovation Center, or to receive a hands-on press preview at TwitchCon 2016, please email Mario R. Kroll and CJ Melendez at pr@uberstrategist.com.

    http://www.marketwired.com/press-rel...on-2161719.htm

  8. #8
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    LiquidSky raises $4 million in funding for ambitious cloud gaming platform

    Picking up where OnLive stalled.

    Paul Lilly
    September 27, 2016

    Remember when OnLive promised to revolutionize gaming with a cloud streaming service similar to Netflix, but for games, not movies? Things didn't quite work out, though the concept of cloud gaming still might if a startup called LiquidSky has anything to say about it.

    LiquidSky has been flying under the radar with a service it's been testing in private beta, which now has 500,000 users participating. Those tests must be going well because it just raised $4 million in a series of seed rounds led by Samsung Global Innovation Center, Sun Microsystems founder Scott McNealy, and former Sun Microsystems and AOL-Time Warner executive Bill Raduchel.

    "We are thrilled to have secured the confidence and financial backing of Samsung Global Innovation Center, as well as technology pioneers Scott McNealy and Bill Raduchel," said Ian McLoughlin, LiquidSky CEO. "Beyond their financial support that will help us scale and grow our infrastructure, their industry know-how is invaluable in helping LiquidSky remain at the bleeding edge of cloud computing."

    What LiquidSky has up its sleeve is a Desktop-as-a-Service (DaaS) platform that supposedly isn't affected by the issues that plagued OnLive. The service lets you play demanding titles on a relatively modest PC or mobile device. The game itself runs in the cloud and is streamed to the user.

    "There’s no need to buy expensive hardware to play the latest PC AAA games or run performance-intensive applications. Just borrow the computing power you need from us," LiquidSky pitches.

    The two biggest issues that OnLive faced were high latency and high costs. Back in August, McLoughlin explained that OnLive was ahead of its time in that regard. He explained to VentureBeat that scaling to support lots of players was a pricey proposition—it required a graphics card in every server to support a single user when OnLive debuted. But now a single Nvidia graphics card can support 128 users on a cloud service.

    LiquidSky says it has a handle on high latency and high costs, along with two other problems that have plagued other cloud-based gaming services, those being limited scalability and a finite catalog of supported games.

    "Gamers can play any PC title nearly anywhere, anytime on Android, Mac, Linux or even low-spec Windows PC devices via their very own cloud-based 'SkyComputer'—a dedicated high-spec Windows gaming PC with up to a terabyte of online storage," LiquidSky says. LiquidSky customers may download and play any PC game or high-performance application they choose from any leading digital distribution portal, including Steam, BattleNet, Uplay, Origin, and many others. If a game or application runs on Windows, LiquidSky supports it!"

    LiquidSky follows a pay-as-you-go model. Customers purchase SkyCredits that run $0.50 each and typically offer a hour of game play. There's a minimum purchase of 10 SkyCredits if going that route.

    There are also subscription plans that run $15 per month for 500GB of storage and 80 hours of game play, or $40 per month for 1TB of storage and unlimited play time.

    LiquidSky still isn't saying when it plans to launch to the public. In the meantime, you can request beta access on its website.

    http://www.pcgamer.com/liquidsky-rai...ming-platform/

  9. #9
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    Exclamation

    "LiquidSky also doesn’t have to buy or build its own custom servers. In a deal with IBM, LiquidSky can access new servers on demand as the traffic requires."


    A LiquidSky está utilizando os serviços da Softlayer, atual IBM Bluemix.

  10. #10
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    How LiquidSky does it

    Brandon Vigliarolo
    August 17, 2016

    ...

    LiquidSky was born out of McLoughlin's seeing early game streaming failures and realizing that he might have a solution. He partnered with cofounder Scott Johnson in 2014 and the two started working on a way to use his h264 compression algorithm to succeed where others had failed.

    McLoughlin and Johnston also wanted to solve another problem they saw in cloud gaming: restricted catalogs. "We want to provide a basic VM that acts just like a regular PC," McLoughlin said. That means no proprietary catalog and no restrictive partnerships: just a cloud-based Windows machine that can run any software the user wants to install.

    At the hardware level there isn't much to differentiate LiquidSky from other DaaS providers. They use IBM Softlayer to provide basic Windows Server VMs. But that's where the similarity ends.

    LiquidSky uses McLoughlin's h264 algorithm along with a custom-built hypervisor and custom Nvidia drivers. All three work together to provide a low-latency experience that is designed to run the newest games and the heaviest rendering software without a hitch.

    Gaming isn't all

    "If you can win a gamer over you can win anyone over," McLoughlin said. LiquidSky plans to extend their platform into the business world, and to do so they've brought two power players on board: Scott McNealy, cofounder of Sun Microsystems, and Bill Raduchel, Sun and AOL/Time Warner's former CTO.

    Raduchel, who is now the chairman of LiquidSky's board, didn't believe that McLoughlin and Johnson could solve the latency problem. "He dug into the tech and the next thing we knew he was investing," McLoughlin said.

    Gamers are the core audience for LiquidSky, and the team has managed to attract nearly 400,000 of them to the closed beta. Business users are there too, and McLoughlin said they've reported success using AutoCAD, Adobe Premier, Photoshop, and other high-demand applications that tax local workstations.

    Virtualizing powerful desktops with minimal latency, whether for gaming or work, could be a game changer. One of the hurdles to widespread adoption of DaaS is performance, and LiquidSky believes it has solved the problem.

    ...

    http://www.techrepublic.com/article/...loud-based-vm/

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