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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Dec 2010
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    [EN] AWS and VMware Now Friends, but What Happens to vCloud Air?

    Tom Howarth
    November 3, 2016

    Recently, at VMworld Barcelona 2106, VMware announced a partnership with AWS to provide an SDDC based on Cloud Foundation on AWS hardware hosted in AWS regional data centers. This environment is a pure VMware play, but using AWS hardware. I had a number of conversations at the conference regarding this announcement, and the consensus appeared to be “Interesting, but we need to know more.”

    Cost was the main question. How will this be priced? Gelsinger intimated that existing customers will be able to leverage their current vSphere licensing to consume the AWS vCloud. This raised additional questions. How exactly do you leverage a CapEx-based perpetual license to a consumption-based OpEx cost? There is little to no information on this. We would like a lot more clarity. We appreciate that it is currently only a technical preview, but if it is going to be utilized on release, budgets need to be planned.

    As to use cases, we came up with quite a few. However, the crux of the questioning was what this might mean for vCloud Air, VMware’s public cloud offering, as well as what it might mean for those in the VMware Service Provider Program (VSPP). For the short to medium term, I think it will be business as usual, especially for the VSPP members. They provide, on the whole, a niche and turnkey solution for regional businesses either to use to burst their private data centers in times of peak usage or to use as DR sites for on-premises data centers. A good example of this is Zettagrid, an Australian VSPP based in Perth. In fact, the vCloud on AWS actually validates its businesses and could provide a way to rapidly expand its public cloud presence at a reasonable price or even add another string to its DR story.

    The more interesting question is what happens to vCloud Air, VMware’s public cloud. The vCloud Air story is one of starts and stops, missed opportunities, and never enough funding to become competitive in the public cloud market, where AWS and Microsoft have poured billions into their offerings.

    The truth is, VMware has never until recently truly understood the cloud. Yes, there is a case for arguing that it was one of the progenitors of the cloud, but its roots are firmly entrenched in legacy hardware–based on-premises data centers. Until recently, it considered vSphere and ESXi specifically its sacred cow and was very protectionist regarding its revenues for ESXi. Gelsinger has been slowly revolutionizing VMware, changing its culture regarding vSphere. However, it takes time to move those executives who are stuck with Old World viewpoints out. Some can be sidelined, but the more visible and senior ones have to be pushed or convinced to “pursue different challenges.” With the departure of Eschenbach and Casado, Gelsinger finally freed himself from the shackles of the founders; consequently, his vision is starting to take shape and form.

    I firmly believe that vCloud Air will evolve as a product and business unit. What we traditionally view as the product will be expanded to include the vCloud on AWS play. I fully believe that VMware will also keep its current investment in data centers but will elevate them to a highly performant target, perhaps even a target for Virtustream’s high-end cloud business. I also think that employees in the vCloud Air business units will remain gainfully employed.

    As for use cases for vCloud on AWS, there are many that come to mind. I am going to propose just a couple of major ones here. Now, considering that NSX is to be included in the offer, there is a powerful case for moving your endpoints to AWS-based vCloud, where they will be running on cheap and cheerful hardware and keeping your crown jewels in-house in your own data centers. Another use case could be off-site DR for on-premises clouds using Zerto or VDP.

    To sum up, we at TVP Strategy feel that VMware is at a turning point. How it manages the migration from its reliance on vSphere revenues to growing its Cloud Foundation, NSX, and VSAN revenues to compensate, and how it delivers on what is actually a valid strategy of multicloud management, will determine whether it has its Nadella moment or Gelsinger goes down as the CEO who managed VMware’s decline into obscurity.

    https://www.virtualizationpractice.c...oud-air-39272/

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    18,556

    This Might Happen to vCloud Air

    Stephen Beaver
    November 8, 2016

    My esteemed colleague and friend Tom Howarth recently posted an article titled “AWS and VMware Now Friends, but What Happens to vCloud Air?” I’d like to take this opportunity to present an alternative possibility regarding what might happen to vCloud Air. I’ll start with a paragraph from Tom’s post and work my way from there.

    “The truth is, VMware has never until recently truly understood the cloud. Yes, there is a case for arguing that it was one of the progenitors of the cloud, but its roots are firmly entrenched in legacy hardware–based on-premises data centers. Until recently, it considered vSphere and ESXi specifically its sacred cow and was very protectionist regarding its revenues for ESXi. Gelsinger has been slowly revolutionizing VMware, changing its culture regarding vSphere. However, it takes time to move those executives who are stuck with Old World viewpoints out. Some can be sidelined, but the more visible and senior ones have to be pushed or convinced to “pursue different challenges.” With the departure of Eschenbach and Casado, Gelsinger finally freed himself from the shackles of the founders; consequently, his vision is starting to take shape and form.”

    I have to admit, I did not quite hear things put the same way, but I do find myself agreeing with Tom’s assessment. One of the takeaways from the VMworld 2016 conference was the company’s change in focus from vSphere straight into the cloud. Whether Cross-Cloud or Cloud Foundry, everything moving forward will be about the cloud.

    Tom believes that “The vCloud Air story is one of starts and stops [and] missed opportunities.” I think that some of these starts and stops might fit more with a realignment and redirection. When vCloud Air was conceived, the original concept was for it to be a direct competitor to Microsoft’s Azure, at some point going up against AWS. I currently think that VMware has moved things in a different direction. The decision to change course was based largely on capabilities that VMware NSX brings into play, as well as on advancements in the vRealize Suite.

    I think VMware realized it couldn’t pour billions of dollars into infrastructure the way Microsoft and Amazon have done, and it decided to focus on integration with the corporations that make up the bulk of its customer base. I believe that VMware came to the conclusion that seamless integration of the public cloud into the VMware corporate customers’ current infrastructures could present some unique opportunities for the public option.

    Since vCloud Air is running on VMware technology, the service can be presented as an extension of the company’s current environment, complete with the functionality of the corporate private cloud. I have heard of specific cases of companies that have discovered it is more cost effective to migrate resources from some of the more expensive data centers into vCloud Air. Seamless transition is going to be VMware’s special niche. Am I the only one who can foresee some sort of cross-cloud vMotion?

    This will be what separates vCloud Air from what I think will be coming from the VMware and AWS partnership. I believe that the AWS option will continue to run on top of AWS’s hypervisor, and the VMware cloud platform will be developed to try to match as much as possible in the native VMware environment. I believe it will take a little time until the fruits of that labor come to market as a completely viable option. At the same time, there will be other use cases for which AWS will be just perfect. In the long run, this partnership with AWS presents more and different opportunities that could enhance what is offered inside vCloud Air. I believe that AWS is the first of several partnerships to be announced, and I hope that VMware continues to strive toward becoming the technology that bridges the different public cloud options available in the marketplace.

    There is another possibility: VMware, with vCloud Air, could be positioned to offer some of the different products from the vRealize Suite as a service from inside vCloud Air. Time will tell where Pat Gelsinger’s vision ends up taking us. I agree that VMware is at a turning point as a company. We will see if it can make the transition while continuing to grow and if it can increase revenue away from vSphere and into some of the other suites of products. I believe vCloud Air can and will be an intricate part of that process.

    https://www.virtualizationpractice.c...oud-air-39308/

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