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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Dec 2010
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    17,309

    [EN] Canonical troca CEO, despede 80+ funcionários, abandona Unity em favor de Gnome

    Shuttleworth returns as CEO.

    The Canonical founder is cutting numbers after an external assessment of his company by potential new financial backers found overstaffing and projects that lacked focus.


    Alexander J Martin
    12 Apr 2017

    More than 80 workers at Ubuntu-maker Canonical are facing the chop as founder Mark Shuttleworth takes back the role of chief executive officer.

    The number, revealed today by The Reg, comes as Shuttleworth assumed the position from CEO of eight years Jane Silber, previously chief operating officer.

    The Reg has learned 31 or more staffers have already left the Linux distro biz ahead of Shuttleworth's rise, with at least 26 others now on formal notice and uncertainty surrounding the remainder. One individual has resigned while others, particularly in parts of the world with more stringent labour laws, such as the UK, are being left in the dark.

    The details come after The Reg revealed cuts were looming as part of a commercial get-fit programme instituted by Shuttleworth.

    The Canonical founder is cutting numbers after an external assessment of his company by potential new financial backers found overstaffing and projects that lacked focus. Projects have been cut as a result of the restructuring, notably the long-promised but never realised Unity 8 convergence project for device and desktop.

    Multiple sources have told the The Register that in many cases staff were bid an immediate goodbye with no forewarning other than our report – mostly being sent on their way via that very personable method of video call.

    A spokesperson for Canonical told The Register cuts are being conducted differently because the company operates in different territories with different "regulatory requirements". They acknowledged that this is creating uncertainty for employees.

    "In the UK we have started the consultation process with a group which is, as required, substantially wider than our actual expected reduction. This process is to enable individuals and the company to find the right mix of people and the right goals for them, but it creates more uncertainty for a larger group than the process in other countries, which is in most countries materially complete."

    Many former workers have expressed their shock, claiming they were last week promised share options by Shuttleworth. Canonical is, right now, privately held. Less than seven days later they were informed of contractual terminations and redundancies with this previously promised share option being withdrawn.

    Canonical's spokesperson told us the offer of equity was a "long-standing offer" and "not part of any severance offer."

    "It is a personal commitment from Mark and is currently in process in the hands of Jane Silber," the rep told us. "Given the global nature of the company, it is not realistic for us to have the necessary structures and contracts in place in less than a week, but they will be established once that work is complete."

    According to Canonical it is offering above-standard severance packages in some regions. "In countries with little or no statutory requirement we have offered more time cover in severance, to balance out these discrepancies ourselves," the spokesperson said.

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/0...aff_face_chop/

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    17,309

    Canonical's Dropping of Unity Is Only the Iceberg's Tip

    Christine Hall
    Apr 8, 2017

    The news that Ubuntu will be dropping development of key desktop components is probably going to eventually be a boon for enterprise users, especially in the cloud. I say "probably," because there seems to be some kind of shakeup happening at the Linux distribution, and we'll need to see how things pan-out before we can trust what our crystal ball is telling us.

    According to an announcement made Wednesday by Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth, beginning next year Ubuntu will be dropping its home grown Unity desktop, replacing it with GNOME, which will bring it full circle to its beginnings as a Debian based GNOME distribution. As they say, everything old is new again.

    In addition to Unity, definitely gone are the Ubuntu phone and convergence, that nifty little feature that automatically switched a phone from a mobile interface to a full scale Linux desktop merely by plugging it up to an external monitor and keyboard. Probably gone as well is Mir, Ubuntu's still under development display server, since GNOME is designed to work and play well with Wayland, and Mir development hasn't gone as smoothly as originally anticipated.

    Wednesday's announcement made it appear that the sole reason behind these moves was to refocus company resources away from the desktop, where it's almost impossible to make money, to the cloud, where Canonical has recently found success and a steady stream of income.

    "The cloud and IoT story for Ubuntu is excellent and continues to improve," wrote Shutleworth. "You all probably know that most public cloud workloads, and most private Linux cloud infrastructures, depend on Ubuntu. You might also know that most of the IoT work in auto, robotics, networking, and machine learning is also on Ubuntu, with Canonical providing commercial services on many of those initiatives. The number and size of commercial engagements around Ubuntu on cloud and IoT has grown materially and consistently."

    The notion that Canonical was merely shifting resources away from the desktop and phone to the cloud and IoT was strengthened by an announcement on the same day from Udi Nachmany, the company's head of public cloud, of a Ubuntu kernel specifically tuned for AWS.

    "As of March 29th, Ubuntu Cloud Images for Amazon have been enabled with the AWS-tuned Ubuntu kernel by default," he wrote. "The AWS-tuned Ubuntu kernel will receive the same level of support and security maintenance as all supported Ubuntu kernels for the duration of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS."

    There might be more to this story than the cloud versus the desktop, however. A shakeup appears to be in the works at Canonical.

    Not long after Shuttleworth made his announcement, The Register reported that over half of those working on the Unity project had received pink slips. The article went on to say that other departments at Ubuntu were also seeing large layoffs.

    "Jobs are also going in other parts of the organization. The cuts came after Canonical founder and millionaire Mark Shuttleworth's decision to seek potential outside investors. These investors determined that Canonical was overstaffed and some projects lacked focus."

    According to The Register, these job cuts ranged from 30 to 60 percent per department.

    "The cuts were part of a package to have departments function according to what Shuttleworth called 'industry-standard' metrics – revenue, costs and margins. He wouldn't comment on the 30 and 60 per cent figures but admitted there were 'adjustments' outside Unity."

    In other words, the "big news" of Ubuntu dropping Unity and its phone to focus on the enterprise is only the tip of the iceberg. Going forward, it appears, Canonical will be more tightly focused on profitability, which in addition to job cuts, will mean eliminating projects that aren't being monetized. This means the desktop edition is probably destined to eventually be dropped, especially since users will have the numerous independently developed (and officially sanctioned) "baby *buntus" as options.

    For several years media pundits have been looking to the day when Shuttleworth will tire of pouring his own money into the company he founded. It appears that day has arrived and that he's trimming away the fat in order to attract investors.

    And there might be more news on the immediate horizon. This morning Michael Larabel at Phoronix reported that he's heard a credible rumor that CEO Jane Sibler might be on her way out, to be replaced by Shuttleworth, who stepped down from the position in 2010. At this point, it wouldn't surprise me if that turned out to be true. Stay tuned...

    http://windowsitpro.com/cloud/canoni...y-icebergs-tip

  3. #3
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    17,309

    Canonical CEO Jane Silber resigns

    Mark Shuttleworth, Canonical and Ubuntu's founder, will take over the top spot at the Linux powerhouse.

    Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols
    April 12, 2017

    When Mark Shuttleworth, Canonical and Ubuntu Linux leader, stepped down as CEO in favor of COO Jane Silber in 2010, no one was too worried. Silber may not have been flashy, but she knew how to keep the company moving forward. In a way, it was like Tim Cook taking over Apple after Steve Job's death.

    Like Cook, Silber was a smart choice. Under her guidance, as she said in a recent PC Magazine interview, "Ubuntu has industry adoption that is both broad and deep. Companies such as Walmart, Netflix, and eBay build their infrastructure on Ubuntu. Telcos such as Deutsche Telekom, AT&T, and NTT build their next-generation telecom capabilities on Ubuntu."

    In addition, Ubuntu became the go-to operating system for all clouds. Even on Microsoft Azure, by last summer one in three Azure virtual machines were running Ubuntu.

    Moreover, Silber continued, "Companies such as Google and Intel use Ubuntu on their developer workstations. Further, Internet of Things (IoT) device manufacturers of gateways, networking devices, robots, and drones all use Ubuntu at scale."

    What Canonical could not do was make Ubuntu a major desktop player. Windows still dominates the desktop. What bothered Shuttleworth even more was that his dream of making Ubuntu a converged end-user operating system that could use the same Unity interface on smartphones, tablets, and PCs didn't come true. It was time for a change.

    Shuttleworth still isn't giving up on the Linux desktop. He has reason, and as Windows transforms from a true desktop operating system to Windows-as-a-Service, Linux still has another shot at the desktop.

    He has also decided to focus Canonical's efforts even more on the cloud and IoT. How he will be doing that is changing. While details are still sketchy, Canonical insiders tell me that Shuttleworth, for the first time in the private company's history, will look for outside funding. For that job, Shuttleworth wants to be in charge.

    So, Silber explained in a blog post, "We're now entering a new phase of accelerated growth at Canonical, and it's time to pass the baton to both seasoned hands and a new generation of Canonical leaders."

    While this look like a sudden decision from the outside, it's not. Silber said she'd "originally agreed to be CEO for five years and we've extended my tenure as CEO by a couple of years already." She also won't be leaving the job immediately. She'll remain the CEO until June 2017.

    She also won't be leaving Canonical. She will move to the Canonical Board of Directors.

    The dynamic Shuttleworth will take charge in July 2017. Before then, however, we should have a better idea on what his plans are for Canonical's next steps.

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/canonic...ilber-resigns/

  4. #4
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    17,309

    Growing Ubuntu for cloud and IoT, rather than phone and convergence

    Mark Shuttleworth, Founder of Ubuntu and Canonical
    5 April 2017

    We are wrapping up an excellent quarter and an excellent year for the company, with performance in many teams and products that we can be proud of. As we head into the new fiscal year, it’s appropriate to reassess each of our initiatives. I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    I’d like to emphasise our ongoing passion for, investment in, and commitment to, the Ubuntu desktop that millions rely on. We will continue to produce the most usable open source desktop in the world, to maintain the existing LTS releases, to work with our commercial partners to distribute that desktop, to support our corporate customers who rely on it, and to delight the millions of IoT and cloud developers who innovate on top of it.

    We care that Ubuntu is widely useful to people who use Linux every day, for personal or commercial projects. That’s why we maintain a wide range of Ubuntu flavours from both Canonical and the Ubuntu community, and why we have invested in the Ubuntu Phone.

    I took the view that, if convergence was the future and we could deliver it as free software, that would be widely appreciated both in the free software community and in the technology industry, where there is substantial frustration with the existing, closed, alternatives available to manufacturers. I was wrong on both counts.
    In the community, our efforts were seen fragmentation not innovation. And industry has not rallied to the possibility, instead taking a ‘better the devil you know’ approach to those form factors, or investing in home-grown platforms. What the Unity8 team has delivered so far is beautiful, usable and solid, but I respect that markets, and community, ultimately decide which products grow and which disappear.

    The cloud and IoT story for Ubuntu is excellent and continues to improve. You all probably know that most public cloud workloads, and most private Linux cloud infrastructures, depend on Ubuntu. You might also know that most of the IoT work in auto, robotics, networking, and machine learning is also on Ubuntu, with Canonical providing commercial services on many of those initiatives. The number and size of commercial engagements around Ubuntu on cloud and IoT has grown materially and consistently.

    This has been, personally, a very difficult decision, because of the force of my conviction in the convergence future, and my personal engagement with the people and the product, both of which are amazing. We feel like a family, but this choice is shaped by commercial constraints, and those two are hard to reconcile.

    The choice, ultimately, is to invest in the areas which are contributing to the growth of the company. Those are Ubuntu itself, for desktops, servers and VMs, our cloud infrastructure products (OpenStack and Kubernetes) our cloud operations capabilities (MAAS, LXD, Juju, BootStack), and our IoT story in snaps and Ubuntu Core. All of those have communities, customers, revenue and growth, the ingredients for a great and independent company, with scale and momentum. This is the time for us to ensure, across the board, that we have the fitness and rigour for that path.

    https://insights.ubuntu.com/2017/04/...d-convergence/

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    17,309
    Alberto Mardegan‏ @mardy Apr 10
    I'm looking for a job! Experienced C++ developer, #Linux #Qt #QML #Gtk #DBus, and much more, former @Canonical and @Nokia.


    Ted Gould‏ @tedjgould Apr 10
    Fun ride, but officially no longer at @canonical. Wish them luck, sad about convergence dying there, looking for a new project to love.


    Tech Jools‏ @tech_jools Apr 11
    Ex Canonical folks, I have open positions for working on containerizing Openstack on Kubernetes using Docker/Kolla/Kargo/Helm. DM me.


    Ted Gould‏ @tedjgould Apr 12
    Removed from the Canonical @github team, but still left all the watches on those projects. Seems like bad defaults.


    Chuck Short‏ @zulcss 3 hours ago
    I am now an ex-Canonicaler as well who got caught up in the great layoff of 2017. Need a cloud and virtualization person? #contactme


    Matthew Helmke‏ @matthewhelmke 50 minutes ago
    I was laid off today from Canonical and am looking for a new job. No hard feelings, but much sadness.

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