Resultados 1 a 6 de 6
  1. #1
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    [EN] Rackspace CEO Rhodes resigns six months after sale

    Taylor Rhodes
    May 3, 2017

    This morning, I announced to my fellow Rackers the toughest decision I’ve ever had to make: I’m leaving the company that I love, where I’ve worked for the past decade and made lifelong friends, and where it’s been my honor to serve as CEO.

    My friend Jeff Cotten, now Rackspace president, will step up as interim CEO. Our board has launched a search for a long-term CEO, and it considers Jeff a strong candidate for that position.

    Kelley Freeman, a local author who has worked as a coach to some of our executives, observes that “the last act of leading is leaving.” What he means, in the context of a CEO, is that when you’ve taken your company as far as you can, given your particular strengths and skills, it’s time to let someone else with different strengths step up and take it farther.

    That’s how I feel today. I’m proud to have led Rackspace through a hinge in its history, as we seized the leadership of the young and fast-growing market for managed cloud services, and as we went private under the ownership of Apollo Global Management and its partners. We recently reported strong fourth-quarter results to our bond and debt holders. And 2017 is shaping up to be even stronger, as we’re exceeding almost all of the financial targets we established with Apollo and our board.

    I know I’m leaving the company in good hands, with Jeff as its new leader, and a strong bench of leaders around him. He and I have been friends and colleagues since we worked together at EDS. I’m proud to have recruited him to Rackspace. Over the past eight years, he has held a series of increasingly challenging leadership roles across key areas of the company, from customer support to sales and new business development. He spent several years based in London and Zurich, growing our international business, which now produces about a third of our $2.1 billion in annual revenue. And he played a pivotal role in developing and scaling our new services for customers who want us to run workloads for them on the infrastructure of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure — and, in the near future, on the Google Cloud Platform. These new services are market leading, and our customers are expressing their love for them through rapid growth and high Net Promoter Scores.

    In each of his roles, Jeff has inspired his teams to succeed. He commands deep respect throughout Rackspace. I leave with confidence that he and a new generation of Rackspace leaders will bring fresh eyes to the company’s challenges and opportunities.

    What’s next for me? I’m going to become the CEO of a smaller private company. It’s based in another city. It does not compete with Rackspace. I’ll be able to talk more specifically about it in a couple of weeks, but for now let me just say that it’s about the size Rackspace was when I started here 10 years ago — and it’s growing about as rapidly. It’s using cloud technologies to disrupt what has been a very low-tech industry. The company is going through growing pains and needs a CEO who has been through those challenges before.

    This opportunity fits my strengths and skills, and I think it will provide a reinvigorating change. This new job, at a smaller company, will also give me more control over my schedule and more time with my kids before the two oldest, who are now in high school, leave home for college.

    I’ll miss Rackspace and the Rackers I love, and my family and I will miss San Antonio. But we plan to stay in touch with the great friends we’ve made here. We’ll always be fans of the city and the Spurs and Rackspace. And we’ll be watching and applauding all three from afar.

    Go, Rackspace, Go!

    https://blog.rackspace.com/why-im-leaving-rackspace

  2. #2
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    Rackspace CEO Taylor Rhodes Leaving Company

    Patrick Danner
    May 3, 2017

    Rackspace Hosting CEO Taylor Rhodes is leaving the San Antonio-based managed cloud computing company on May 16, about six months after he steered it through a $4.3 billion sale.

    On Wednesday, Rhodes wrote in a blog post titled “Why I’m Leaving Rackspace” that he will become CEO of a smaller private company in another city. He didn’t identify the company but said it doesn’t compete with Rackspace. He added he will be able to discuss it in more detail in a couple of weeks.

    “It’s using cloud technologies to disrupt what has been a very low-tech industry,” Rhodes said in the post. “The company is going through growing pains and needs a CEO who has been through those challenges before.”

    Rhodes pocketed at least $22.7 million from the sale of his stock and options in the Apollo deal, according to a Nov. 3 filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

    Whether Rhodes will receive an additional severance pay upon his departure couldn’t be determined. Under the terms of his employment agreement, he is entitled to two times his annual base salary and bonus, plus other payments, if he leaves for “good reason” within 24 months of the merger. That includes “a material reduction” in his duties, base pay or target bonus.

    Rhodes would be entitled to a “golden parachute” payment of almost $4.6 million if he leaves for good reason, the company disclosed in a November filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

    “We don’t have a comment on Taylor’s compensation, as these details are between him and Apollo,” Jacob said.

    Rackspace’s No. 2 executive, Jeff Cotten, will serve as interim CEO, spokeswoman Monica Jacob said.

    “He and his fellow Rackers are determined to build on the momentum that Taylor created,” she said. A search for his replacement is under way. Cotten is a strong candidate to permanently fill the post, she said.

    Cotten was named president earlier this year to fill the spot that had been vacated by Rhodes when he was promoted to CEO in 2014.

    New York private equity firm Apollo Global Management acquired Rackspace in November, taking the publicly traded company private. As part of the deal, Apollo targeted $100 million in annual cost reductions.

    The ax fell three months ago when Rackspace announced it was slashing about 6 percent of its staff, or at least 275 of Rackspace’s more than 4,600-person U.S. workforce. About 200 of the jobs targeted for elimination were at its headquarters.

    Rhodes called the cuts “personally painful” but “necessary and manageable.”

    Rhodes, who joined Rackspace in 2007, replaced company co-founder and former Chairman Graham Weston as CEO in 2014. Weston had been serving as chief executive on an interim basis. After a four-month review that included hiring investment banking firm Morgan Stanley to assist the company to size up its “strategic” options, Rackspace chose to remain as independent.

    Less than two years later, in August, though, Rackspace announced a sale to Apollo.

    “There are times when it’s great for companies to be public, and there are times that are great for companies to be private,” Rhodes said at the time. “When we were a private company, we could make decisions with a longer time horizon than potentially we can as a public company.”

    Rhodes then reflected on the days when Rackspace was privately held, and operated without the constant scrutiny by public investors.

    “And we knew the right things to do for the long-term viability of the company, and that’s what we feel excited about doing as a private company,” he added.

    Rhodes made assurances that Rackspace would keep its headquarters in San Antonio.

    http://www.mysanantonio.com/business...y-11118048.php

  3. #3
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    Rackspace After Taylor

    Jeff Cotten
    May 3, 2017

    By now, you may have heard that our CEO, Taylor Rhodes, is leaving Rackspace and that the board has asked me to step up as interim CEO.

    I’m sure this news has hit many of you as hard as it hit me when I heard it. Taylor and I have worked together since we were at EDS, way back when mainframes ruled the earth. He’s the one who brought me to Rackspace. He has mentored me through new roles in many parts of our business. And he’s done the same for scores of other Rackers.

    Taylor has led us successfully through some challenging times, and I’m grateful to him for that. He has positioned us well for the next phase of the Rackspace journey — which begins today.

    While my title is “interim” CEO, our board and I are in agreement that we’re not going to take any kind of timeout. We’re going to keep driving to expand Rackspace’s leadership of the fast-growing market for managed cloud services.

    In his blog post earlier today, Taylor mentioned how well we’re performing, and his confidence in our future. I share that confidence, based on our growth in revenue, profit, and cash flow in recent quarters, and on the initiatives we have underway for the remainder of 2017.

    Now that we’re a private company, we don’t publicly report many financial metrics. But I can tell you that for the full year of 2016, we grew in revenue across all of our product lines. We grew EBITDA and expanded our EBITDA margins. And we more than doubled our cash flow and cash flow margins.

    Looking forward to the rest of 2017:

    • Our sales pipeline is strong.
    • Our existing customers place a high value on the expertise and Fanatical Support that we provide, as measured by the rising Net Promoter Scores that they give us, and by their declining rate of departure churn, which just hit a five-quarter low.
    • Our managed public cloud services, for customers who use the infrastructure of Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure, were launched less than two years ago, and are growing at a rate of more than 1,400 percent, year over year. Rackspace has achieved the highest partner status available from AWS and Microsoft Azure. More than 1,000 Rackers have achieved technical certifications on those platforms.
    • Under our recently announced partnership with Google, we will soon add managed public cloud services for the Google Cloud Platform. This will make us the only company on the planet that can deliver expertise and support on all the leading public and private clouds, including the VMware, Microsoft and OpenStack private clouds.
    • We are working to open a data center in Germany, to complement the sales office we opened there late last year. These facilities will help us meet brisk demand for managed cloud services among companies doing business in Germany and all across continental Europe.


    In short, Taylor leaves Rackspace in solid condition. I and my fellow Rackers across four continents are determined to build on the momentum he has helped us create. Taylor will be with us until May 16, so please join me in thanking him for his contributions to Rackspace and San Antonio, and wish him and his family well in their next adventure.

    https://blog.rackspace.com/rackspace...-taylor-rhodes

  4. #4
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
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    17,189
    A impressão que eu tenho é que a música parou e não tem cadeira para a Rackspace sentar.

    Será mesmo que a Rackspace de hoje é mais saudável que 10 anos atrás, quando Rhodes assumiu? Continuará existindo daqui a 10 anos? Acho que não.

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Dec 2010
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    Rackspace CEO quits to spend more time with his kids

    Simon Sharwood
    4 May 2017

    Rackspace CEO Taylor Rhodes has decided to leave the company he's led since late 2014.

    He's blogged the reasons why, of course. And of course there's some phrases that could only come from a tech company, like “I’m proud to have led Rackspace through a hinge in its history”.

    A hinge? That's what Rhodes calls moving out of public cloud and into cloud services, before taking the company private in late 2016. Rackspace also abandoned an “OpenStack-powered open clouds are the only clouds worth having” creed and adopted a “whatever cloud you want, we'll run and/or service it” position.

    The timing of Rhodes' departure looks suspicious, coming as it does just nine months after going private. But there's no hint of an ouster in his departure post, in which he says he's off to become “CEO of a smaller private company … about the size Rackspace was when I started here 10 years ago — and it’s growing about as rapidly. It’s using cloud technologies to disrupt what has been a very low-tech industry. The company is going through growing pains and needs a CEO who has been through those challenges before.”

    He can't name that company for a few weeks, but says working for a smaller company will give him “more control over my schedule and more time with my kids before the two oldest, who are now in high school, leave home for college.”

    Rackspace president Jeff Cotten will step up as interim CEO and says “While my title is “interim” CEO, our board and I are in agreement that we’re not going to take any kind of timeout. We’re going to keep driving to expand Rackspace’s leadership of the fast-growing market for managed cloud services.”

    There's no word on whether Cotten is on training wheels or if a search for a permanent CEO is under way. It wouldn't surprise if the latter scenario plays out because Cotten only became president in January 2017. But Rhodes reckons Cotten will do fine because he was instrumental in setting up Rackspace's international business, which “now produces about a third of our $2.1 billion in annual revenue.”

    Cotten offers some data of his own, noting that as a private company Rackspace isn't obliged to tell you its phone number, never mind a revenue number. “I can tell you that for the full year of 2016, we grew in revenue across all of our product lines,” he writes. “We grew EBITDA and expanded our EBITDA margins. And we more than doubled our cash flow and cash flow margins.”

    Of course Cotten plans to send all those numbers further skyward, especially once Rackspace starts offering services for Google's cloud any week now.

    Rhodes' departure is almost being mourned: the company has a strong collaborative culture that the former CEO championed. Consensus from employee posts The Register has read on social media suggests that culture will survive his departure, but that the transition will be made easier thanks to the strength of the company's identity.

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/0..._rhodes_quits/

  6. #6
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    17,189

    OpenStack

    Day one of Red Hat Summit in Boston.

    R. DANES
    02 MAY 2017

    ...

    Sandra Rivera, vice president and general manager of the network platforms group at Intel Corp, started her talk with a nod to Red Hat Inc. and Intel for their open-source contributions. “Intel and Red Hat are the number one and number two providers or contributors to the Linux kernel, and we have been for over 10 years,” she told Summit attendees.

    ...

    Red Hat and Google are two stellar examples of profitable entities that use open-source technology and also give freely to the open-source community.

    This mining of open-source as a raw material was pointed up by Bryan Thompson, general manager of OpenStack Private Cloud at Rackspace Inc., which uses Red Hat’s OpenStack platform in its private cloud offering.

    “We offer Red Hat OpenStack Platform delivered as a service with a 99.9 percent availability uptime in any data center,” he said.

    Red Hat’s Distributed Continued Integration, which tests hardware compatibility, allows RackSpace to make the latest version of OpenStack available to customers within two weeks of release. “We’ve had a lot of interest from enterprises,” Thompson said.

    ...

    https://siliconangle.com/blog/2017/0...-redhatsummit/

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