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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    18,573

    [EN] The Evolution of Container Usage at Netflix

    Containers are already adding value to our proven globally available cloud platform based on Amazon EC2 virtual machines. We’ve shared pieces of Netflix’s container story in the past (video, slides), but this blog post will discuss containers at Netflix in depth. As part of this story, we will cover Titus: Netflix’s infrastructural foundation for container based applications. Titus provides Netflix scale cluster and resource management as well as container execution with deep Amazon EC2 integration and common Netflix infrastructure enablement.

    This month marks two major milestones for containers at Netflix. First, we have achieved a new level of scale, crossing one million containers launched per week. Second, Titus now supports services that are part of our streaming service customer experience. We will dive deeper into what we have done with Docker containers as well as what makes our container runtime unique.

    Artigo completo: https://medium.com/netflix-techblog/...x-3abfc096781b

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
    Data de Ingresso
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    18,573

    How does LXD relate to Docker?

    At its simplest, LXD is a daemon which provides a REST API to drive LXC containers.

    Its main goal is to provide a user experience that’s similar to that of virtual machines but using Linux containers rather than hardware virtualization.

    LXD focuses on system containers, also called infrastructure containers. That is, a LXD container runs a full Linux system, exactly as it would be when run on metal or in a VM.

    Those containers will typically be long running and based on a clean distribution image. Traditional configuration management tools and deployment tools can be used with LXD containers exactly as you would use them for a VM, cloud instance or physical machine.

    In contrast, Docker focuses on ephemeral, stateless, minimal containers that won’t typically get upgraded or re-configured but instead just be replaced entirely. That makes Docker and similar projects much closer to a software distribution mechanism than a machine management tool.

    The two models aren’t mutually exclusive either. You can absolutely use LXD to provide full Linux systems to your users who can then install Docker inside their LXD container to run the software they want.

    https://stgraber.org/2016/03/11/lxd-...on-to-lxd-112/

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