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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Where is the consumer hosting market going next?

    Lee, May 19, 2017

    [15-20] years ago it was all the rage to have a personal website, no really, everyone who was anyone including your Gran had a website, it maybe only had a guestbook (remember them) but it was a customer nonetheless.

    In 2017 shared/reseller hosting is not so much a thing, comparatively. There is a market and it will stay for a while longer but with Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, [LinkedIn, Github, Medium, Youtube] and so on the personal site clients are running low.

    Even devices prevent people wanting to build sites, fewer and fewer people I know have a desktop PC/Mac, a phone and a tablet and/or laptop does the job, but not for sitting 3 hours building sites.

    I believe the market in shared/reseller is shrinking, those left are getting smarter with their choices, some firms may seem their client base climbing not because there are more clients, less are looking at the $1 unlimited market and more are not settling for a sub par service.

    Personally, I don't think it will continue to coast for too much longer, perhaps it will be largely replaced by the wordpress/Wix type offerings where people can blog and build things from their tablet.

    Views?
    https://vpsboard.com/threads/where-i...ing-next.9791/

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Jonathan, May 24, 2017

    #4

    People don't necessarily want shared hosting in the traditional sense of being able to have X domains, X MySQL DBs, etc. People are going more for the SaaS (I hate all the aaS phrases...) where you deliver them a working piece of software, ie WP, Joomla, etc. They don't care about the nitty gritty and many hosts are spinning WP into a site builder of sorts.

    Hosts that are effectively delivering and advertising to this market are thriving and will continue to do so. The whole trend of having eeeeverything connected to the internet/"cloud" has in a large way dumbed people down IMO so instead of a market that's getting smarter and always looking for the most technologically superior product you have a market looking for the easy way out where they can point and click and be in the "cloud".

  3. #3
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    jarland, May 25, 2017

    I think the future of the consumer space is found in something that is readily available today but hasn't quite caught up to replacing the basic website/CMS yet. I'm thinking services ranging from Etsy to Squarespace. You can see the two paths I'm going down there. Services like Etsy replaces the personal website for selling your crafted items, while services like Squarespace will replace the business sites or professional blogger sites.

    Wordpress will be dethroned in the next decade. The path to it's end in popularity is a very long one though, it doesn't happen in a day. These are the reasons it will fall from it's pedestal:

    - Designer builds site, tosses it on their hosting account, charges client once. Never updates. Site compromised. Client blames designer. Client won't pay for updates. Bad blood follows, client looks for new solution. Client might pick the same solution with a different designer. After a few failures, which can take years, maybe they try something new.

    - Non-technical customer uses easy Wordpress installation and a purchased theme, believes they've taken care of themselves. Fails to update. Compromised. Blames host. Starts over with a new host. After the same thing happens over the next few years, maybe they try something new.

    - Non-technical customer spins up unmanaged VPS with Wordpress, has no idea how to admin, pays too little for their bad optimization and goes OOM regularly after their crappy plugin fills the database with trash. Blames host, moves to a new one and is fine for another year or two. After it happens a few times, maybe they try something new.

    All of these scenarios involve non-technical customers blaming someone else for their poor choices because their poor choices take a long time to become apparent. That leads them to believe the choice wasn't the problem, they think someone screwed them over somewhere to try to get more money out of them. This is why Wordpress has a hold on the market that we all see coming to an end, but none of us can see the end of the tunnel. It's a damn long path, but it will happen. There's no other CMS that people are going to rush to. SaaS is where they truly find "set it and forget it" and that's where I still believe they will all end up.

  4. #4
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    maounique, May 25, 2017

    SaaS is where they truly find "set it and forget it" and that's where I still believe they will all end up.
    I also think so, the management will involve more and more automation and "botting" to check stuff, occasionally, some human may be needed, but in 90% of the customer usage scenarios, well written automation platforms will suffice.

    Managed hosting is too expensive, unmanaged we all know where it leads with every joe, dick and harry as webmasters, SaaS may evolve to be a middle way, not quite managed, but very close.

  5. #5
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    maounique, May 25, 2017

    These are companies where the prices of all the inputs continue to go down,
    Perhaps, but they are fewer all the time, eventually, the costs will stop going down, you can get hosting now for a dollar a month or below, the financial costs with the payments for very low priced offers are a hard threshold and going up, actually, in many cases. Hardware is still getting better for the same price, but power is not, while rack space it is pretty stable price wise.

    The really interesting cost, though, is the one with support, tickets can cost 1 $ per piece even the simplest ones and even with the very well known and hated "outsourced" schemes, I think there is no space for further price cuts these days, apart for a rethinking of the industry model as discussed above.

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