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  1. #1
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    [EN] Rackspace Acquires TriCore

    TriCore has about 500 workers in the United States and India.

    Scott Ferguson
    5/25/2017

    It's been a busy week for Rackspace. After hiring a new CEO on Wednesday, the company is announcing its largest acquisition to date on Thursday, which will help expand its managed services business into enterprise applications.

    On May 25, Rackspace is officially announcing a deal to buy TriCore Solutions, a Norwell, Mass.-based company that specialized in managing enterprise applications, including enterprise resource planning (ERP), human resources, supply chain and other software, for mid-market businesses.

    The two firms did not disclose the financial details of the agreement, but Matt Bradley, vice president of corporate development and strategy for Rackspace, told Enterprise Cloud News the acquisition was the largest in the company's history.

    Previous Rackspace acquisitions usually involved other companies with less than 100 employees. TriCore has about 500 workers in the United States and India and all of them will become Rackspace employees once the deal closes in June, including CEO Mark Clayman, Bradley said.

    For several years, Rackspace attempted to compete in the public cloud market against the likes of Amazon Web Services. It's a fight that the company eventually lost and decided that it would focus on managed cloud services for its customers, along with partnerships with AWS, Microsoft Azure and Google's Cloud Platform.

    At the same time, Rackspace continued with private cloud build-outs, using the OpenStack platform it helped develop with NASA about seven years ago.

    From there, Rackspace has begun expand what it can offer as a managed service through the cloud, whether public, private or hybrid. The company has a security services it has built out over the last several years and recently introduced a line of professional managed services that customers can use on a project-by-project basis.

    With the TriCore deal, Rackspace can move up the stack and offer customers in the mid-market a way to manage their enterprise applications. Although companies such as Oracle and SAP also offers their apps through the cloud, Bradley said these vendors don't want to actually manage the apps themselves for their customers and are looking to partners through their channel, as well as companies such as Rackspace.

    "What TriCore does is that they do the technical support, but they also do the functional support on top and even if the whole world went to Oracle, someone would still have to manage the application on behalf of the customer," said Bradley.

    Ted Chamberlin, a research vice president for cloud service providers at Gartner, estimates that the global market for the type of services TriCore provides is worth about $110 billion, and even if Rackspace goes after a small fraction of that market, it's still worth about $10 to $12 billion.

    Acquisitions are rare for Rackspace, but that could change now that the company is under private management and is looking to build out it services portfolio, Bradley said. In addition, the company is eyeing expansion in continental Europe and Asia and other deals could give them a foothold in those markets.

    Even with the appointment of new CEO Joe Eazor this week, those plans are unlikely to change as Rackspace will likely pursue an aggressive plan to expand its managed services portfolio through the second half of the year.

    "Some people are looking at us and saying 'You guys are really going for it,' and my answer to that is yes," said Bradley "I think our new ownership wants us to be really aggressive in growing the business and driving new products into our customer set so that we can ultimately become a more important company in the eyes of our customers … this is big investment number one with many more to come and I think it shows that our direction is the opposite of what it was eight years ago."

    http://www.enterprisecloudnews.com/a...section_id=571

  2. #2
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    Citação Postado originalmente por 5ms Ver Post
    "... even if the whole world went to Oracle, someone would still have to manage the application on behalf of the customer," said Bradley.
    Como ocorre faz muitas décadas

  3. #3
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    Rackspace Board Appoints Joe Eazor as New CEO

    Brandon Brunson
    May 24, 2017

    Rackspace® today announced that the company’s board of directors has appointed technology industry veteran Joe Eazor as the new CEO of Rackspace, effective on June 12. As CEO, Eazor will be responsible for the company’s global strategy and operations, spanning the U.S. and the three other continents where Rackspace maintains offices and data centers.

    As one of the most seasoned and effective CEOs in the technology industry, Eazor has deep experience running everything from startups to huge divisions of global enterprises. He is an inspiring leader with a strong track record of delivering value to customers, employees and investors.

    “I’m proud and excited to welcome Joe to Rackspace,” said David Sambur, senior partner at Apollo Global Management and chairman of the Rackspace board of directors. “Joe has had a long and successful career growing IT services businesses. He has a proven reputation for driving investment and allocation of resources to the areas that will generate the best returns. Joe has led large and complex organizations. And he will be a good fit as CEO for Rackspace, a company whose culture is a unique asset that has produced industry leading Net Promoter Scores and low customer churn.”

    Rackspace President Jeff Cotten has served as interim CEO since the company’s previous chief executive, Taylor Rhodes, departed in early May. Sambur, the board, and Eazor are pleased that Cotten will continue to serve as president. “All of us feel that Joe will be a great culture fit, as well as a very effective CEO,” said Cotten, who knew Eazor when they both worked at EDS nearly a decade ago. “Joe brings deep IT services experience, and strong leadership qualities. I look forward to working with him.”

    “As soon as the call came about Rackspace, I knew that was where I wanted to go,” Eazor said. “I know the company. I’ve visited the headquarters and felt the spirit there, and watched Rackers at work. I admire Rackspace’s well-earned reputation for expertise and Fanatical Support® — and for a workplace culture that makes that great support possible.

    “I’m excited by the huge market opportunity that Rackspace has, as companies move out of their corporate data centers and into multiple clouds,” he added. “Rackspace is uniquely well positioned to take advantage of this trend, as the only provider who can deliver expertise and exceptional customer service for all of the leading public and private clouds, along with managed hosting. Thanks to the strategy Rackspace adopted a few years ago, it’s got the early lead in the managed cloud space. My goal here is to build on that foundation and make us the world’s preeminent IT-services company.”

    Eazor, 54, has spent more than 25 years as a technology executive. His roles have given him leadership experience across strategy, customer support, product development, global sales and marketing, international operations, M&A, and business process outsourcing.

    He most recently served as CEO of EarthLink, a pioneer of dial-up Internet service that he led into profitable new areas of cloud networking. While at EarthLink, Eazor transformed its strategy, investing in profitable new products and exceptional customer service. He doubled free cash flow, sharply lifted employee culture scores and achieved a 79 percent CEO approval rating on Glassdoor. In 2016, Forbes named Earthlink one of the 100 Most Trustworthy Companies in America. In February, Eazor led the sale of the company to Windstream for $1.1 billion. With that transaction, he delivered significant returns to shareholders during his three years as CEO.

    Before leading EarthLink, Eazor served as a top executive at EMC, HP and EDS. After HP’s acquisition of EDS, Eazor was responsible for integrating that $22 billion business into its new parent. Prior to the acquisition by HP, he led EDS’s Asia Pacific business and offshoring operations while living in Shanghai, China. Earlier in his career, he gained experience working with private equity investors as CEO of an Internet portal services startup called Springbow Solutions. He also currently serves on the boards of Commvault Systems and Discover Financial Services.

    Eazor earned a bachelor’s degree in petroleum engineering from the Colorado School of Mines and an MBA at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. He and his family have been living in the Dallas, Texas area off and on over the last 25 years.

    https://blog.rackspace.com/rackspace...e_eazor_as_ceo

  4. #4
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    Unusual frankness

    Frederic Lardinois
    May 24, 2017

    Rackspace today announced that its board has appointed Joe Eazor as its new CEO, effective June 12. Eazor will replace Rackspace president Jeff Cotten, who stepped in as the company’s interim CEO after former CEO Taylor Rhodes left the company about three weeks ago.

    At the time, Rhodes said he left Rackspace to become “the CEO of a smaller private company.” That company, we now know, was the Chicago-based property management firm SMS Assist.

    In a moment of unusual frankness — especially in this kind of context — interim CEO Cotten, who became Rackspace’s president in January, acknowledged that he had hoped to become the full-time CEO himself. “I don’t mind telling you that when I was named interim CEO of Rackspace a few weeks ago, I was hoping that I would be able to shed the first word of that title and serve as the long-term chief executive at the company that I love,” he wrote. “But my attitude was that if our board of directors could find someone better — someone with more relevant experience; someone I could learn from and collaborate with, I would be all for it. And that’s exactly what the board has done.”

    Eazor joins Rackspace after stints at EarthLink, where he worked on moving the company from its focus on dial-up internet many moons ago to a new focus on cloud networking. Before that, he was at EMC, HP and EDS. Among other things, he led EDS’s Asia Pacific business and offshoring operations.

    “I’m excited by the huge market opportunity that Rackspace has, as companies move out of their corporate data centers and into multiple clouds,” said Eazor in today’s announcement. “Rackspace is uniquely well positioned to take advantage of this trend, as the only provider who can deliver expertise and exceptional customer service for all the leading public and private clouds, along with managed hosting. Thanks to the strategy Rackspace adopted a few years ago, it’s got the early lead in the managed cloud space. My goal here is to build on that foundation and make us the world’s preeminent IT-services company.”

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/05/24/ra...t-get-the-job/

  5. #5
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    Rackspace veering further from its core hosting business towards managed services

    Tanwen Dawn-Hiscox
    26 May 2017

    It’s been a tumultuous week at Rackspace. On Wednesday, the company appointed Joe Eazor - who worked with former CEO Taylor Rhodes and interim CEO Jeff Cotten at EDS in the 1990s - as its chief executive. And yesterday, the company made public its decision to buy enterprise application management platform TriCore solutions.

    Like Rackspace, TriCore provides managed infrastructure services, but it also does consulting, outsourced IT services, and delivers managed applications from vendors such as Oracle and SAP, used for business analytics, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and data integration; the latter being the main resource Rackspace wishes to gain from the purchase, as it can scarcely compete with major cloud hosting companies anymore.

    In 2013, the company’s share value dropped by 60 percent as public cloud providers seized a growing share of the managed infrastructure market. Rackspace was then sold to Apollo Global Management for $4.3 billion and has since been going through an internal restructuring process to reduce costs. Acquiring TriCore will mean the company can offer more comprehensive services at enterprise level.

    An internal survey of Rackspace employees reportedly found that 70 percent of sales staff lost at least one potential customer in the past year due to not being able to offer services like those supplied by TriCore. Jeff Cotton said “customers are asking us to move further ‘up the stack’ by expanding our managed application capabilities.”

    “TriCore’s services are among the best in that space and are highly complementary to ours. They will help enable us to deliver more of the services that our existing customers need, while opening the door to new opportunities across the globe.”

    The acquisition is expected to be finalized in June. TriCore will continue to operate from its base in Norwell Massachusetts, and keep its employees in Pennsylvania and India.

    TriCore CEO Mark Clayman stated that “TriCore and Rackspace are a great fit in terms of our cultures and we offer complementary services.”

    “We’ve worked for 18 years to develop our delivery expertise, create value for customers, and win their trust and loyalty. We are extremely excited to join the Rackspace team and leverage its brand and industry reach to continue to expand our offerings.”

    http://www.datacenterdynamics.com/co.../98374.article
    Última edição por 5ms; 26-05-2017 às 12:49.

  6. #6
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    O fim da Rackspace

    Dias atrás ainda, postei que não acreditava que a Rackspace tivesse mais 10 anos. Não tinha 1 semana.

    Já era sabido que a empresa não tinha encontrado comprador após várias tentativas. O que fazer? Os filhotes da EDS venderam a idéia de uma EDS para um "investidor"*

    Infelizmente, empresas de consultoria precisam ter clientes, consultores, e alguma credibilidade. A Rackspace não tem nenhum dos três, especialmente após a tentativa de se qualificar usando uma risivel "parceria" com a NASA. Solução? Comprar um "pacote" de consultores e clientes. O que irão fazer com o suporte fanático? Bidu. E com os equipamentos que ficarão obsoletos? Bidu. A empresa comprada tem o feudinho (conquistado em 18 anos) para proteger das trocentas accentures e dimension data da vida, sem falar da IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, Red Hat e, por que não, talvez uma "AWS Consulting", ou das empresas indianas que já operam no campinho. O mercado é atraente mas maduro.


    (*)

    He goes to the bank, tries to borrow.
    But we know from the news, they're not lending.
    A loan shark?
    On that level they call 'em something else.
    Private equity.
    But a shark in a suit is still a shark.

    Fargo, S03E06

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