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  1. #1
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Dec 2010
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    [EN] The Huge Premium Intel Is Charging For Skylake Xeons

    Timothy Prickett Morgan
    September 1, 2017


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    Making comparisons across the Skylake Xeon lineup and with prior generations is somewhat complicated by the fact that this line is the convergence of the Xeon E5 and E7 lines. In a way, this really should be called the Xeon E6.5 line, since if you look at all of the SKUs, there are an awful lot of Platinum and Gold processors that support four or eight processors. There are not nearly as many chips that support just two sockets, and many of them that do have integrated 100 Gb/sec Omni Path fabric controllers on their packages. Take a look at the Skylake Xeons and their relative performance metrics:



    See? There are no versions of the Skylake processors that support two sockets that are in the High Performance Per Core category, as if customers who had two socket servers did not also want high performance. (Maybe Google and Microsoft are going to be buying up four-socket and eight-socket boxes by the millions to drive their search engines?) The Broadwell Xeon E7, which supported four and eight sockets, had 24 cores compared to the Xeon E5, which topped out at 22 cores and, practically and economically speaking, was only affordable with 18 cores or fewer with clock speeds at 2.3 GHz or lower. You had to really want 22 or 24 Broadwell cores, and you had to either be paying an HPC premium (which supercomputing centers are used to) or getting a hyperscale discount (which the biggest web players demand).

    The 51 SKUs in the Skylake product line are a lot to take in all at once. There seems to be a little something for everyone, except a SKU that is tuned for single-socket servers. (We think that will change soon enough, particularly if AMD starts getting traction with its Epyc X86 chip line with its strategy of replacing two-socket Xeon servers with single-socket Epycs.) As we did last year with the Broadwell comparisons, this year with the Skylakes we are going to try to make comparisons for three types of CPUs: those with the highest core count, the top bin of the standard partners, and those chips with the four cores of the original Nehalem chips to show what improvements in IPC and architecture along with process mean in terms of performance when the core count is constant.

    There are obviously lots of different ways to dice and slice the comparisons, but we are trying to reckon in the bang for the buck is flat, down, or up.

    For reference, here is a table showing all of these three comparisons, which will make it easier to think about:



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    https://www.nextplatform.com/2017/09...skylake-xeons/

  2. #2
    WHT-BR Top Member
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    Dec 2010
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    17,961

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